fbpx

Yose Power ebike kit review

This post contains affiliate links, to find out more information, please read my affiliate disclosure

Yose Power ebike kit

If you’re thinking of converting your bike to electric assist, navigating your way through the huge amount of kits on offer can be mind boggling.  Fortunately, one of the cheapest and most reliable  conversion kits is available on eBay. In this Yose Power ebike kit review I will look at the pros and cons based on my experience installing over 50 of these kits on customers bikes.

Summary

From 2016-2019 I made a living converting bikes to electric assist and one of my favourite conversions kits was sold via eBay.  Yose Power are based in China but sell a majority of their ebike kits through eBay in the UK and EU. I installed my first Yose Power kit in 2017 and was immediately impressed with the quality and performance of the motor.

Fast forward to 2020 and I still do the occasional conversion, since 2017 I reckon I’ve converted over 50 bikes using this kit. One of the stand out things about these conversion kits is not only the price, but long-term reliability is about the best I’ve encountered in the DIY ebike world.

yose power ebike kit review

I have had lots of issues with mid-drive conversions and a few problems with cheap direct drive hub motors but the Yose Power kits have never caused me any major bother. On top of that you get a hell of a lot for your money – it’s one of the few kits that gives you a useful tool kit and headlight.

Below I have outlined some of the key features of the Yose Power ebike kit.

Advertisement

Buy from Yose Power direct and use the coupon code BH2E24BXQH for a €10 discount

Motor kit

The kit comes in a variety of options and wheel sizes (listed below) and is available as a front or rear wheel conversion – the latter being the more popular choice.

  • Wheel sizes: 26″ / 27.5″ / 28″
  • Motor colour: Silver / black
  • Gear cassette: Screw-on freewheel or cassette (8/9/10 speed)
  • Power rating: 250w / 350w
  • Voltage: 36v

As you can see there are options to suit all the common wheel sizes and gear systems used on modern bikes.

yose power rear wheel hub motor

Potential compatibility problems

The Yose Power kit is designed to fit regular ‘quick release’ front or rear dropouts of approximately 100mm wide on the front and 135mm at the rear. A lot of modern mountain bikes and road bikes have ‘thru-axle’ hubs – bikes with this type of hub would not be suitable for an electric hub motor.

Another occasional problem I’ve encountered is tyre width – this isn’t a problem on hybrid or mountain bikes, but if you’re thinking of fitting this kit to a road bike you will need clearance for a 28mm wide tyre. This is the minimum width tyre recommended for this rim.

Pedal sensor compatibility

A cadence pedal sensor is included in the kit – it comes in the form of a split magnetic disc (secured with a spring clip) and the pick-up sensor. This is usually fine to use with a regular square-tapered bottom bracket axle but it will not work with a Hollowtech type external bottom bracket. If you have the latter fitted to your bike you will need to purchase a separate sensor.

yose power ebike kit pedal sensor fitted

Brake lever compatibility

The supplied brake levers with integrated motor cut-off sensors are suitable to use with cable brakes (disc, cantilever or v-brakes). If your bike has hydraulic brakes or integrated brake lever / gear shifter you are faced with two choices – don’t bother with cut-offs (the motor will run fine without them) or buy specific sensors for hydraulic brakes.

Do I need brake cut-off sensors?

Personally I’ve never used them. The motor will start and stop only when you pedal – even if you use the supplied throttle, it will only work once you are travelling at at least 6mph. In the unlikely event the motor stays on, you can hit the kill switch or apply the brakes hard.

Disc brakes

Both the front and rear hub motor have six bolt fixings to mount a brake rotor if required – it is important you use the disc bolts provided as if you use longer ones they will interfere with the running of the motor.

Motor

The motor supplied with the Yose Power kit is available in 250w or 350w power options. These small hub motors have an internal gear reduction system so the motor is always spinning faster than the wheel. This makes the motor more efficient and produce more torque than a similar direct-drive unit.

yose power rear hub motor

Motor power is determined by the controller – 250w has a 36v 15A controller and the 350w a 36v 18A.  In the UK and EU the law states the motor should not exceed 250w of continuous power – it’s up to you whether you get the 350w version, but personally I don’t feel the extra power is worth the risk – the motor power rating is visible on the hub motor.

Performance

I live at the bottom of a short steep hill (10% over 0.25 miles) and I converted the old Giant hybrid bike (pictured below) for a chap in his 80’s – he rode up the hill whilst simultaneously laughing his head off saying “this is brilliant”! I think that sums up the Yose Power motor. It’s not a speed demon in the way a Bafang mid-drive is but the power it produces is more than adequate for most riders. I used to own a bike fitted with one of these kits and I very rarely used it above level 2 assist (out of 5).

yose power fitted to hybrid bike

How reliable is the Yose Power ebike kit?

Simple answer is very reliable indeed! To date the only problems I’ve encountered have been very minor and relate to the pedal sensor – on some bikes there is limited clearance between the pedal crank and bottom bracket, this can cause the magnetic disc to stick. I have never had a motor fail or cause problems.

One other issue I’ve had a couple of times is on the cassette freehub version – occasionally this fails and can be a pain to fix. If your motor kit is still under warranty then it shouldn’t be a problem as their customer service is usually very good.

Display

On the older kits they used to use the proven KT-LCD3 display but more recently they use a different display which is very high quality and has an aluminium back plate. This is an excellent display, especially when you consider the price of the kit – I would go as far as saying it’s better than a lot of the displays you get on factory e-bikes.

yose power display

There is lots of information available to the rider:

  • Speed (mph or km/h)
  • Pedal assist level
  • Battery indicator
  • Real-time battery voltage
  • Trip function

Accessories

Yose Power are one of the few ebike kit suppliers who include instructions and a toolkit. The toolkit comprises of a full Allen key set, crank puller, chain whip and cassette removal tool. They also include a headlight that plugs into the wiring harness and can be powered on/off by the display. Cable ties are also supplied which is a nice attention to detail.

Ease of installation

Installation is fairly straightforward even for a novice. What you will need is a bit of patience (roughly 2-3 hours) and preferably a workspace and bike stand. Most of the tools are provided but you will also need some cable cutters (to tidy up cable ties).

yose power electric bike kit review

The front wheel conversion is a little easier than the rear as you don’t need to swap out the gear freewheel or cassette. You will need to remove the tyre, inner tube and wheel liner.  Then remove the freewheel / cassette and disc rotor (if you have disc brakes). Then you transfer everything to the motor wheel.

Fitting the wheel can be a bit tricky as the hub is a little wider than the standard 135mm – on alloy and steel frames you will need to splay the drop outs by a few mm to get the axle to drop in.

Then it’s a case of mounting the pedal sensor, battery, controller and display – plug everything in, tidy the wires, charge the battery and you’re good to go. If you’re not confident in doing the job yourself I would try a local bike shop as more and more are doing conversions these days.

Battery

Some of the Yose Power kits are supplied with a battery. These kits are great because the controller is integrated into the battery mounting plate – this makes for a really neat installation. Batteries available are usually 36v 12.5Ah and these battery packs seem to be very reliable.

yose power ebike kit review

Yose Power ebike kit review conclusion

I personally think that if you’re after a cheap electric bike kit that’s going to perform as good as a hub motor found on something like the Carrera Vulcan, then you can’t go wrong with the Yose Power kits. When it comes to quality they punch well above their weight.

They perform well, they’re reliable and can be used for leisure riding or commuting – I did one back in 2017 and the guy used it for commuting 5 days a week for three years all through British winters and it was still running like a dream!

👉See the most popular Yose Power kits on ebikepricecomparison.com (UK visitors)

I always recommend these kits for their simplicity. Even if the motor packed up after a couple of years, they’re easy to fix (for the DIY minded) or cheap enough to just buy another kit.

The Yose Power kits represent an affordable entry to the world of e-biking – if you want to breathe new life into an old hybrid or mountain bike, these kits are the best value by far.

Where to buy the Yose Power electric bike conversion kit

Buy from Yose Power direct and use the coupon code BH2E24BXQH for a €10 discount

eBay UK

Amazon UK

eBay Germany

Amazon Germany

eBay France

Amazon France

eBay Spain

Amazon Spain

Thanks for reading, if you have any questions please use the comments section below. I usually respond within 24 hrs.

Please feel free to ask a question via our new forum which has a section dedicated to the Yose Power e-bike kit.

Please follow and like us:

Yose Power ebike kit

£215.99
9.2

Value for Money

10.0/10

Performance

7.5/10

Reliability

10.0/10

Pros

  • Best value ebike conversion kit available
  • Excellent quality
  • Decent performance

Cons

  • Compatibility issues with some bikes

Tony

Passionate E-Bike advocate and enthusiast. 5 years experience converting bikes for customers primarily using Bafang and Tongsheng electric bike motors.

50 thoughts on “Yose Power ebike kit review

  • August 21, 2021 at 7:09 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    Looked through comments here and can’t find answers, so here’s my Q.:-
    I am considering a Yose front hub kit for my ’80s Raleigh Maverick mtb, a rear hub motor would be my choice, but the chainstays really are only 130mm or less apart (only a 5 speed freewheel), and I just think yanking them apart to the 138mm required is not a good thing ! And I can see other problems along the way too.(wheel dish). So for a front hub motor:- how would you say the motor noise compared with, say, a Shimano mid-drive – I have borrowed a bike with an e6000 motor and it’s pretty quiet, so that is my reference noise ! I know it’s a subjective thing, but just getting your opinion.
    Also, my Raleigh has a steel frame with two bottle mounts on down tube – however these are too low for the standard Yose battery mount I think – I notice one of the photos above shows you have mounted one upside down – does the batt need to slide down 20mm or so before releasing like this ?
    And do you think mounting on only two bolts is good enough ? Is the batt base plate curved to fit to the down tube .? It looks not from your photo – so the batt is going to vibrate sideways isn’t it ? (I can make up a shaped packing piece, but just getting your opinion again !) I guess there’s no easy way to add a mount at the controller end of the assembly – I’d have to dismantle the controller :o/…
    Thanks for any advice – I am keen not to break my classic old Raleigh – I’m even concerned about the idea of applying too much torque to old steel forks ! They stand braking force ok though, so….
    Dave

    Reply
    • August 21, 2021 at 8:48 am
      Permalink

      Hi Dave,
      I have an e-bike with a Shimano Steps E6100 motor and I would say it’s quieter than the Yose Power front hub motor. The hub motor tends to produce quite an audible whine especially when in higher power modes. This can be mitigated by removing the motor cover and packing a bit of extra grease in where the planetary gears are. I use a high quality grease which doesn’t degrade the nylon gears – Mobilgrease28.

      The battery does need to move roughly 20mm to slide in/out of the holder so mounting it the opposite way round should work. There are usually two shaped rubber mounts supplied with the batteries that go between the mounting plate and downtube.

      I’m assuming your Raleigh has Reynolds 501 or 531 steel tubing which in my experience in incredibly durable. I’ve converted a lot of older steel bikes over the years and if anything it’s the best material to have on a donor bike, so you should have no worries there.

      Let me know how it goes and if you have any more questions, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • August 31, 2021 at 7:41 am
        Permalink

        Thanks for response to my questions Tony. I have a Yose front hub mounted on my Raleigh now, after quite some fiddling to get it to fit the forks spacing of 96mm – a very thin washer has given a gap between motor and fork bottom of about 0.25mm, and yet I can still (just) spring the forks apart to get the wheel in. Now I am waiting for the rack battery to arrive. I think that will need modding so that my panniers will fit also….oh well, it is a project after all. Thanks for advice on adding extra grease to quieten motor – I will see how it is first, and may be order some Mobilgrease28.
        This is all an experiment, a hub motor may just not get me up my local hills, where my borrowed Shimano e6000 bike certainly does.
        Thanks, Dave

        Reply
        • August 31, 2021 at 8:19 am
          Permalink

          Thanks for the update, let me know what you think of the performance when you have it all running. I think you may be pleasantly surprised, I find these motors work well on moderate hills of 6% – 10% gradient, anything much above that and they do start to struggle. It will feel totally different to the Shimano Steps though, much more of an on/off feel to the assist and nowhere near as much torque.

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
  • August 11, 2021 at 9:36 pm
    Permalink

    Hi can i ask how do you know what kit to buy for your bike??………i see yose do two types of 26in wheel kits one for “rear motor freewheel” and the other kit is “rear wheel fit for cassette”, not very clued up on the terminolgy used i have a Giant Talon mountain bike and was looking to add an electric kit as my knee is pretty well goosed now but unsure of what one to buy lol…

    Reply
    • August 11, 2021 at 10:22 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Stuart,
      If your bike has 7 gears or less on the back wheel then it’s likely to be a screw-on freewheel, unless your bike was made in the late 90’s, then it could be either. 8 gears and above is usually a cassette. If in doubt send me the exact model and approximate year of manufacture and I’ll let you know for sure.
      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • August 12, 2021 at 7:47 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony…i have had a good look around the internet trying to find my model i believe it to be a 2010 Tallon 3 26in Wheel model Black and Blue in colour and it has 8 gears on the rear… i also did manage to find a copy of a brochure from Talon for 2010 on the net for their complete model range that year and all the bike specs and looking at it seems my Talon 3 is a cassette type ..it may be over ten years old but its been kept in good order and it suits my needs so a yose upgrade will hopefully keep it going for another ten years lol…thanks again Tony your informative article has convinced me its the kit to go for thanks again..
        Cheers

        Stuart

        Reply
  • July 25, 2021 at 3:03 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    Fascinating article and it is so generous of you to spend your precious time answering questions. So I have another one! I am considering fitting a front-wheel Yose Power conversion to my beloved Raleigh Royal 531 road touring bike, which has good old 27 x 1.25 ” rims – I imagine the 700c (28″) wheel will fit. BUT: what battery is available that might give me a touring range of 60 miles per day with luggage? Obvs I intend to use as little assistance as possible, but my dodgy knee is getting dodgier as I get older! I really don’t want to use another bike, as my present one is an old fiend – we have seen many, many touring miles together. Many thanks, Simon

    Reply
    • July 25, 2021 at 4:39 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Simon,

      I converted two Dawes Galaxy Touring bikes a couple of years back and I fitted 36v 20Ah batteries on both. The customer reported a range of 70-90 miles which I thought was pretty good. Yose Power sell a 36v 20Ah frame bag battery which should do the job comfortably. Here is the link. Also, I have just installed a forum on this website (in menu bar). It’s empty at the moment but hopefully will build steadily over the next few months. Good luck with the build and if you need any more advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • July 25, 2021 at 5:27 pm
        Permalink

        Thank you Tony, that is amazingly helpful. I will let you know how I get on! The Galaxy is similar to the Royal – in fact, I had one for a while but preferred the Raleigh, mine is one of the last of the hand-made specials from Nottingham, so as you can imagine I want to keep it. Thanks again, and All the best, Simon

        Reply
        • September 20, 2021 at 7:14 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Tony. I have just converted a bike using a 36v 250w rear wheel kit. Because I have yet to determine how to attach the PAS sensor to the bottom bracket, I left the PAS disconnected and powered up the motor. I was surprised to find that the motor controller did not need the sensor to operate. Have I got the wrong controller or do I need to change a setting?
          Paul.

          Reply
          • September 20, 2021 at 7:42 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Paul,

            That’s quite normal, the motor can run (on throttle) without the pedal sensor fitted. You can usually disable the throttle function in the advanced settings on the display, but if you’re not going to fit the throttle it won’t matter. The pedal sensor should be fairly straightforward to install if you have a sealed cartridge bottom bracket. They were supplying a split magnetic sensor ring with a separate sensor, but if they’ve gone back to the integrated sensor unit you’ll need to remove the non-drive side crank arm. The sensor slides over the BB axle and presses into the notched cup of the bearing.

            Let me know if you have any more questions.

            All the best,
            Tony

      • July 25, 2021 at 5:44 pm
        Permalink

        By the way, after posting my first reply, I see that you also live in Cornwall! I am near Callington – Harrowbarrow, in fact, with a very steep climb out of the village, which sometimes puts me off even starting a ride… I’m originally from the Highlands, another hilly area – which I used to cycle as a teenager on a fixed gear BSA Golden Clubman dating from the 1950s. I was a lot stronger then. I wonder which part of Cornwall you are to? 🙂

        Reply
        • July 25, 2021 at 6:09 pm
          Permalink

          I’m about 6 miles from Callington, near Blunts. I do a regular ride through Harrowbarrow down to Cotehele – there’s some challenging climbs in that area. I ride a 1990 Dawes Galaxy which I brought from Tavistock 3 years ago for the princely sum of £50. 10’000 miles later it’s still soldering on!

          Reply
          • July 26, 2021 at 8:42 pm
            Permalink

            10,000 miles in three years is pretty impressive! I have probably seen you pedal past at some point… Call in for a cuppa sometime! (“Shalam,” Rising Sun, opposite Pearce’s yard). BTW, which wheel size would be the bettter replacement for the old 27 x 1.25″? I see a 27.5 inch seems to be on offer…

          • July 26, 2021 at 10:18 pm
            Permalink

            I reckon the 27.5″ is worth a try although the rim will be marginally wider. Another option would be to see Pete at Callington cycles and get the motor laced into the original rim. He’s an excellent wheel builder and very reasonably priced. The drop-out spacing will be a bit wider on the hub motor (135mm) but that shouldn’t be too much of a problem on an old Reynolds frame. I know roughly where you are so I’ll pop in for a cuppa when I’m over there next.

            Cheers,
            Tony

      • July 31, 2021 at 8:45 am
        Permalink

        Hi Tony, me again!

        I have received the kit but to my consternation the PAS at first appeared to be missing…but there is a small round rotary item with a cable attached that *might* be the PAS but will certainly need the crank pulling off if so (it isn’t neatly split like the one in the packing list, and in your article). Also, kinf of hard to see how it should be fitted. Any thoughts?

        Thanks again, Simon in Harrowbarrow.

        Reply
        • July 31, 2021 at 11:01 am
          Permalink

          Hi Simon,

          It sounds like you have the one-piece pedal sensor which I’d thought they had stop using due to compatibility issues. I might have a split one here, but I’ll need to check later this afternoon. If I haven’t got one you can ask YosePower to send one out.

          Regards,
          Tony

          Reply
          • July 31, 2021 at 12:38 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Tony,

            I worked out what it was eventually, and to be fair to YosePower they had included a crank-puller in the toolkit! So I have fitted the PAS now. Had to do a fair bit of filing away at the wheel spindle to allow the front hub to fit the Raleigh’s dropouts…hope to have the conversion completed this afternoon. Mentioned you to Pete at Callington Cycles this morning (I had to buy a 700c tyre and tube!) and he remembers you well (in a good way that is). All the best, and thanks for replying again,

            Simon

          • July 31, 2021 at 1:12 pm
            Permalink

            Cheers Simon, thanks for the update. Let me know how things go, and I’ll have to drop by on my next ride out your way to see it in person.

      • August 3, 2021 at 4:41 pm
        Permalink

        Value for Money

        10

        Performance

        10

        Reliability

        0

        Hi Tony, just converted my road trekking bike to an ebike with Yosepower kit. It’s really super so far and am looking forward to testing it out fully. Just one question: what are recommended settings for the Advanced Settings menu (I’m just a casual bike user aged 69 and don’t plan any assault on Alpe d’Huez anytime soon! Thank you. Gus Kelleher

        Reply
        • August 3, 2021 at 6:30 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Gus,
          If your kit has the latest C500 display I would be inclined to leave the settings as they are. The current is limited to 15A (to match controller). The slow start up setting should reduce or increase the initial boost and ramp up the power slower or faster. Pedal assist sensitivity will determine how far the pedal needs to rotate before the assist kicks in. I think the best thing is to take it for a ride and see how it feels. If you feel it needs more initial boost then incrementally increase the slow start up setting and PAS sensitivity settings.
          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
    • July 31, 2021 at 3:17 pm
      Permalink

      It was all going so well!

      Thought all I had left to do was connect up the battery…then I discovered that the battery connevtor (it’s the 20 Ah one as discussed) was ENTIRELY different to the controller’s connector!

      Ah well….I’ve messaged Yose Power to see if they have a convertor cable they can send me. If not, I’m up for getting out the soldering iron and making one up myself…but won’t do that quite yet in case it invalidates a warranty.

      Nearly there…butI’m off on tour in a week’s time!

      Please do drop in when you’re passing, BTW.

      Cheers

      Simon

      Reply
      • July 31, 2021 at 5:19 pm
        Permalink

        I used to come across that problem quite frequently. I used to use the small red and black Anderson connectors, I think the YS battery controller has male/female bullet connectors. Let me know if you get stuck, I could drop some round early next week.

        Reply
  • July 20, 2021 at 1:58 pm
    Permalink

    Hi. I have the 20 inch version of this kit and I think the km/h computer counts with a 26 inch wheel hence it reads higher speed. Can I this adjust for 20 inch?

    Reply
  • May 29, 2021 at 3:08 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    10

    Performance

    10

    Reliability

    10

    Hi Tony,
    Great review!
    I was reading the c500 display manual and noticed that the current setting is set to 15A while the setting on my display is set to 13A.
    Do you know what would be the pros and cons of changing the current setting even to the max to 18A and why mine was set only at 13A, did you had the same setting before?
    Is there any other settings that you recommend to change to improve this kit?

    Best Regards

    Reply
    • May 30, 2021 at 9:12 am
      Permalink

      Hi Ted,

      I’ve never played around with the current settings, but I would imagine it depends on what controller is fitted. If your controller has a maximum current of 15A, then that is the maximum you could draw from it. If you have the 350w version then it will be an 18A controller, if it’s the 250w version then it will be 15A. If you can increase the current in-line with your controller maximum then you should see a slight increase in peak power – this will also marginally increase battery energy consumption.

      I hope this helps.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • May 4, 2021 at 4:46 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    Thanks for the thorough review. I know you’re not tech support for these guys but wonder if you can help…

    I just installed a kit from these guys and had it working before it was all fully fitted. Now that it’s all in place on the bike I can turn the battery on and see it has power, the controller is getting warm, but the display will not light up (neither will the PAS sensor). I’ve tried taking out every connection and putting it back in again and again but not getting any joy. Is the most likely option a faulty controller or display? Or are there any common issues you’ve come across that I could be falling foul of?

    Many thanks,

    Robbie

    Reply
    • May 4, 2021 at 7:54 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Robbie,

      That’s not a problem I’ve encountered before with the YS kit. It’s unusual that the controller is getting warm – that shouldn’t feel warm until you’ve been riding it with the assist on for a while. I suspect there could be a problem with the wiring loom possibly causing a short, but it’s hard to say without seeing the bike in the flesh. It’s worth inspecting all the pins in the connectors as they can easily get bent. If they’re all okay I would contact YS to see if they can either send out some new parts of accept a return.

      Let me know how things go.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • May 5, 2021 at 11:33 am
        Permalink

        Thanks for this Tony. I am speaking to the supplier to hopefully resolve this. I appreciate your time.

        Reply
  • April 28, 2021 at 11:20 am
    Permalink

    Hello 🙂

    I posted a question few days ago but for some reason it disappeared. Just in case that you havent seen it im reposting it again. Im interested in buying yose power kit with downtube 36V15Ah battery and rear motor kit with casette, and these are my questions:

    I have Jamis citizen 3 with 700x38c tires ( i guess 28″ wheel). My downtube is rather thin with 4.7 cm diameter. Is it smart to go for downtube battery or downtube thickness is not an issue when choosing a battery? I thought of buying rear rack battery but i assumed that it might be to much weight for the back wheel with motor included.

    Best regards
    Josip

    Reply
    • April 28, 2021 at 11:36 am
      Permalink

      Hi Josip,

      I had a look at the Jamis Citizen 3 and if it’s the low-step frame version you won’t be able to fit the downtube battery in there. A rack-mounted battery would be the easiest option, or you could drill a couple of holes in the upper tube, fit riv-nuts and mount the donwtube battery there. The dimensions of the YosePower downtube battery are approximately 365mm x 110mm x 110mm. I have fitted quite a few rack mounted batteries over the years and I’ve never had any issues reported.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 27, 2021 at 11:41 am
    Permalink

    Hello 🙂

    Im thinking of buying conversion kit from yose power but im not sure what type of battery to go for. My downtube is rater thin, so i tought that going for downtube battery is not such a great idea. I was thinking about buying rear rack battery. Is there any difference in performance between the two if they have same specifications? Also, does downtube thickness play an important role when choosing a battery? These are the batteries i was considering:

    https://yosepower.com/collections/e-bike-battery/products/36v12-5ah-ebike-battery-with-black-rear-carrier

    https://yosepower.com/collections/e-bike-battery/products/36v-12-5ah-down-tube-battery

    Also, what is the difference between 36 v and 48 v batteries, in means of performance, and is there a big difference between 12,5 Ah and 15 Ah batteries?

    Best regards
    Josip

    Reply
    • April 27, 2021 at 2:10 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,

      Looking at the frame design of the Jamis Citizen 3, You will need to purchase a rack battery as there’s no mounting points for a downtube battery.

      Most of the YosePower kits are 36v so you will need a 36v battery. The Ah rating refers to amp hours – to get the total energy capacity you multiply V x Ah = Wh (watt hours). A higher Ah battery will not improve the motor performance but will mean a greater battery range – a 15Ah battery will give a slightly better range than a 12.5Ah.

      Let me know if you have any more questions.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
        • April 28, 2021 at 11:43 am
          Permalink

          I’ve just found some more images of the Jamis and if yours is the regular frame version then you should be okay. The only potential problem I can see is lining up the bottle holes with the battery mounting plate, but this can usually be overcome by drilling an extra hole in the plate.

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
          • April 28, 2021 at 11:50 am
            Permalink

            Yes, its the regular one. Thank you very much for your answer.

            Best regards
            Josip

          • April 28, 2021 at 1:57 pm
            Permalink

            Ok, i have one more question 🙂 I would have to drill 3 new holes (existing ones are not in line with the size of the whole set) and one hole, the one on the top would be in an akward part of the rim. Rim is not that round in that part, its even thiner and kind of spiky. Is it advisable to put rimnuts in that part?

            Best regards
            Josip

          • April 28, 2021 at 2:43 pm
            Permalink

            Looking at the position of the bottle holder holes, you may be okay. You only need to fix the battery using a minimum of 2 screws. On the Marin bike featured in this article I turned the battery the other way to fit it. It’s not aesthetically ideal but it does the job.

            Regards,
            Tony

          • May 1, 2021 at 3:17 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Josip,

            I have used these batteries in the past but never tested the full range potential. My customers used to get around 50-60km using mixed levels of assist – I would imagine you could squeeze 100km if you were using level 1 and you didn’t need to climb any big hills.

            Regards,
            Tony

  • April 23, 2021 at 8:43 pm
    Permalink

    Hi would this be suitable to fit on a ladies Halfords Carrera Crossfire 2 hybrid bike. It has disk brakes. Which would be the better lighter option with least resistance. Only want to use it for the killer hills. Thanks

    Reply
    • April 23, 2021 at 8:50 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,

      Yes, the motor weighs around 2kg and battery is about 3kg, because it’s a geared hub motor there is virtually no resistance when pedalling without assist.
      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 23, 2021 at 3:51 pm
    Permalink

    Hi would this be suitable to fit on a ladies halfords carrera crossfire 2 hybrid bike. It has disk brakes. Thanks

    Reply
    • April 23, 2021 at 4:25 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,

      Yes it will fit a Carrera Crossfire 2, you’ll need the 700c / 28″ wheel version and if you’re going for the rear motor you will need to choose the gear cassette freehub version (as opposed to the screw-on freewheel version).

      If you are buying the whole kit with battery, the frame mounted battery will not fit inside the frame, you will need to mount the battery on the rack if possible.

      I’ve converted a couple of Crossfires in the past and they’re fairly straightforward to convert.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 10, 2021 at 10:11 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    What are the main reasons that makes this kit a better value than the Bafang’s 250W BBS01B and how would they compare to each other?

    Is it true that there is no power switch on their default 12.5Ah battery?

    Thanks

    Reply
    • April 11, 2021 at 9:32 am
      Permalink

      Hi,
      That’s correct, there is no power switch on their 36v 12.5ah battery.

      Regarding comparison between the Yose Power kit and Bafang, it depends on your usage and budget. A BBS01B is going to produce a lot more torque and will be more efficient plus the finished product will be neater. But there is noticeable pedalling resistance when the motor isn’t in use and you’re limited to a single chainring. Long term reliability can also be an issue. The Yose Power kit is better suited to moderately undulating terrain and produces very little resistance when the motor isn’t in use. You can also retain your existing crankset. The YS kit is also much more reliable in my opinion. If I had to choose between the two I would go with the Bafang, but I can repair it if it goes wrong. If you’re happy expect to service the motor from time to time then the Bafang is a great motor. But if you want a kit you can fit and forget, the YS kit is hard to beat.

      I hope this helps, if you have any further questions please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *