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Best eBike Conversion Kits in 2020

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What are the best ebike conversion kits in 2020?

Electric bikes are increasing in popularity year on year, and 2020 is shaping up to be one of the best yet. Despite the overwhelming array of e-bikes currently available and a massive reduction in prices, the DIY ebike option is still very popular amongst intrepid enthusiasts.  In this article I have selected some of the best ebike conversion kits currently available – I have personal experience installing a lot of these kits, so my appraisal will be based on personal experience.

For the benefit of this article I will be breaking down the kits into two sub-categories: Best mid-drive ebike conversion kit, best rear wheel hub motor kit.

For more information on ebike conversion kits, and choosing the right one for your needs, please read my comprehensive electric bike conversion kit buyers guide.

***Please check the legality of these kits in your country before making a purchase – in the UK and EU anything that produces more than 250w continuous power and 15.5mph (25km/h) is classed as a moped and subject to the same rules and regulations. US Federal law allows up to 750w and 20mph.

Best Mid-Drive Electric Bike Conversion Kit

Mid-drive electric bike conversion kits are by far the most refined, in terms of power delivery and efficiency. A good 250w mid-drive will easily outperform a 500w direct drive hub motor in every aspect.

There are two main players in the plug and play mid-drive motor market: Bafang have dominated the DIY ebike conversion kit market for years with their BBS series of motors, and more recently Tongsheng have become incredibly popular with their torque-sensing TSDZ2 motor.

btwin riverside 900 diy electric bike

Although both motors are similar in many ways, the way they produce electric assist is quite different. The Bafang uses a simple cadence sensor, which measures pedal rotation (and speed). The Tongsheng TSDZ2 motor uses a more sophisticated torque sensor – this measures the amount of force being applied to the pedals and gives the rider assistance in proportion to that force.

Which motor is best suited to you really depends on your requirements as a rider. I find the Bafang is generally more suited to riders who have knee problems, as the pedal assist acts very much like an on/off switch. You do not need to exert any discernible force to get the motor to start. Once you’re on the move, you can effectively ‘ghost pedal’ which means, you can spin the pedals without putting in any effort (although this depends on the power rating of the motor you have).

The Tongsheng on the other hand requires a small amount of force to be exerted through the pedals before the assist will kick in. This torque-sensing effect produces a very smooth and intuitive pedal assist, making the motor feel more like an extension of your own abilities. Basically it takes your pedalling effort and amplifies it. You cannot ghost pedal with the TSDZ2, as the motor will not assist – you will only get assistance in proportion to your effort.

I personally prefer the torque sensing assist of the Tongsheng, as it feels very similar to high-end units like the Bosch or Shimano Steps ebike systems. For a direct comparison between the two motors, read the full article here.

Anyway, on with the list. I have also included the lesser-known Lingbei mid-drive, and although I have yet to test one out, they do have good customer feedback.

1. Bafang Mid-Drive E-Bike Conversion Kit

bafang bbs02b 48v 750w electric bike kit

It was Bafang that got the ball rolling with plug-and-play mid-drive e-bike kits back in 2014. In the ensuing years, this motor has gone from strength to strength, undergoing various upgrades to the electronics. A lot of people have a love / hate relationship with these motors ( including me!). They are fantastic when they are running well, but can be a pain when they go wrong.

The Bafang is available in various guises, I have listed the power outputs below for each model:

BafangBatteryPeak Power
BBS01 250w 36v36v (42.2v x 15A)
633w
BBS01 350w 36v36v (42.2v x 18A)759w
Please note: Due to the firmware programming on the BBS01B 250w, the power may peak at around 600w when the motor is under load going up a steep hill, but will settle back to 250w when pedalling on the flat.
BafangBatteryPeak Power
BBS02 500w 36v36v (42.2v x 25A)
1055w
BBS02 500w 48v48v (54.4v x 18A)864w
BBS02 500w 48v52v (58.8v x 18A)
1058w
BBS02 750w 48v48v (54.4v x 25A)1200w
BBS02 750w 48v52v (58.8v x 25A)1470w
The voltage figures in brackets are for a fully-charged battery. Note: As the voltage drops, so will the power.
BafangBatteryPeak Power
BBSHD48v (54.4v) x 30A
1632w
BBSHD52v (58.8v) x 30A1764w
The voltage figures in brackets are for a fully-charged battery. Note: As the voltage drops, so will the power.

The BBS01 250w / 350w is the same motor, just with different firmware settings in the controller. Although physically the same, the BBS02 has a more powerful motor, and can handle 48v at 25A maximum (or 52v if you’re feeling lucky!), the 500w version has 18A maximum current and there is a 36v 500w version that uses a different controller.

These motors use cadence based pedal assist, meaning that the motor provides assistance based on pedal rotation (and cadence speed). I personally prefer the torque sensing pedal assist of the Tongsheng TSDZ2, but one of the great things about the Bafang is the ease at which it can be reprogrammed. All you need is a USB lead and the software and you are good to go. The software is very user friendly and there is plenty of information available on programming (particularly endless sphere).

What’s included in the kit

  • Bafang BBS01 / BBS02 / BBSHD mid-drive electric motor
  • LCD Display – B&W C961 / C965 or full colour P850c / P750c / DP-C18
  • Speed Sensor with spoke magnet
  • Motor fixing plate (and fixings)
  • Motor lockrings
  • Wiring loom
  • E-Brakes (for cable brakes only)

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Is this kit easy to install?

Any mid-drive motor installation requires the complete removal of the bike’s bottom bracket. You will need to have the right Shimano bottom bracket tool for the job, and also a decent breaker bar. Removing the bottom bracket can be difficult, but thankfully once this job is done the rest is fairly easy. Once you have removed the bottom bracket you will need to clean the area and possibly use a little sand paper to prepare the shell for insertion of the motor axle.

You will need a Bafang tool to tighten the lockring. If you do not want to purchase one of these, a c-spanner will suffice, but be prepared for scraped knuckles!

If all goes smoothly it should only take around 3 hours, but it can take a lot longer, if you end up having problems removing the bottom bracket. I have a downloadable PDF installation guide available.

What bikes are compatible?

This kit is only suitable for bicycles that have a 68mm-73mm threaded bottom bracket (including Shimano Hollowtech ll or SRAM GPX) I would not personally attempt fitting one to a bike with a pressed fit bottom bracket, as you will need to machine a special shim adaptor – fine if you know a good engineer. PLEASE NOTE: There is a 100mm and 120mm bottom bracket version of the BBS01, BBS02 and BBSHD suitable for Fat Bikes.

Conclusion

Despite some of the reliability issues I have experienced with customer conversions, I still think the Bafang BBS02B 750w is one of the best ebike conversion kits available. I used a BBS02 powered bike for the best part of a year, clocking up nearly 2000 miles, and I never had even a hint of a problem. Having said that, I used the bike as a means of getting fitter, so would only use the power when I really needed it.

It seems that a lot of the problems experienced with this motor happen when they are thrashed constantly in full power mode. Thankfully there is never a shortage of spare parts available.


I have installed over a hundred of these motors, and have had a lot of happy customers. But there have been issues with controllers failing – these failures all happened on bike’s that had 52v batteries fitted.

The most reliable of the Bafang mid-drives are the 36v 250w / 350w BBS01 variants, I have only ever had one failure reported with this model.

If you can live with the potential issues, that may arise, these really are excellent motors and well worth the money!

For more information on the Bafang mid-drive kit, I have posted a full review of the BBS01 250w and the BBS02 in separate posts.


2. Tongsheng TSDZ2 Mid-Drive eBike Conversion Kittongsheng tsdz2

I absolutely love the Tongsheng. It is a cracking little mid-drive motor for the money. If you are after Bosch-like performance for a fraction of the price, then this is the kit for you.

As I have stated in my full review of the TSDZ2 this is a good system, and like the Bafang BBS01 / BBS02, it is available in 250w / 350w / 500w / 750w versions.

For those of you unfamiliar with this motor. It uses a torque sensor for pedal assist, meaning it will give you power, proportionate to the amount of force applied to the pedals (much like the Bosch system). The benefits of this system are, it gives you an enhanced cycling experience rather than just giving you power whenever the pedals are turned. In other words, you still have to put a bit of effort in.

What’s included in the kit

  • Tongsheng TSDZ2 mid-drive electric motor
  • LCD Display
  • Speed Sensor with spoke magnet
  • Installation spanner / tool
  • Motor fixing plate (and fixings)
  • Motor lock-rings
  • Wiring loom

Is this kit easy to install?

Mid-drive motor installation requires the complete removal of the bike’s bottom bracket. You will need to have the right Shimano bottom bracket tool for the job, and also a decent breaker bar. Removing the bottom bracket can be a right pain (literally!) but thankfully once this job is done the rest is fairly easy. Once you have removed the bottom bracket you will need to clean the area and possibly use a little sand paper to prepare the shell for insertion of the motor axle.

If all goes smoothly it should only take around 3 hours, but it can take a lot longer, if you end up having problems removing the bottom bracket. Watch the installation video below to see how the motor fits – it is worth noting that it looks like the bottom bracket was loosened beforehand.

What bikes are compatible?

This kit is only suitable for bicycles that have a 68mm-73mm threaded bottom bracket (including Shimano Hollowtech ll or SRAM GPX) I would not personally attempt fitting one to a bike with a pressed fit bottom bracket, as you will need to machine a special shim adaptor – fine if you know a good engineer.

Conclusion

When I was writing my review of the Tongsheng TSDZ2 I was very tempted to make it my number one electric bike kit.

In my opinion, it beats the Bafang, hands-down in a number of areas. The chain-line is slightly better, and you could even fit a double chainring to this motor if you wanted (something that doesn’t work well on the Bafang). The other thing I like about this motor, is that it is not too difficult to pedal with the power off.

Orange full suspension mountain bike fitted with a tongsheng tsdz2 electric bike kit

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The only reason I haven’t put this kit at the top spot, is because the Bafang mid-drive is a more versatile, as far as custom programming is concerned.

The TSDZ2 may not suit everyone’s tastes, but if you are after an enhanced cycling experience, where you still have to put in some effort, then this could be the electric bike kit for you.

As with all mid-drive motors, the long-term reliability is questionable, and it really boils down to luck of the draw, and the way you ride it. Thankfully there is a good supply of replacement parts available. You will also need to purchase a separate 36v or 48v Lithium battery pack.


3. Lingbei Mid-Drive Electric Bike Kit [GP-LB01]

GP-LB01 mid-drive motor

The GP-LB01 mid-drive e-bike kit is manufactured by Lingbei and is available on Aliexpress through a trusted vendor I have used numerous times in the past. This recently  released motor has been developed by a group of former Bafang engineers, and there are certainly some similarities between the GP-LB01 and Bafang BBS01/BBS02.

It is available in 36v 250w and 350w versions and there is also a 48v500w version available. There are also two different displays available, the black and white C600 display and the colour C800 display. Both displays are very clear with the colour display being my preferred choice.Apart from the external similarities, the internals are quite different. This motor uses a similar geared reduction system as the Bafang but one major design improvement is a much beefier primary nylon gear. This important part is substantially bigger in size than both the Bafang and Tonsheng gear. One could assume that the service life of this particular part should be longer.

gp mid drive motor primary gear

The other main difference between this and the Bafang is that it uses a torque sensing pedal assist (like the Tongsheng). As I have mentioned before, I personally prefer this kind of pedal assist as it makes the motor feel more like an extension of your own abilities.

As this motor is relatively new, it is hard to gauge the long-term reliability, especially where the electrics are concerned, but early customer reports seem to suggest this is a good alternative to the Bafang and Tongsheng TSDZ2.

The motor is apparently very quiet and smooth and provides responsive pedal assist on demand.

Installation

The installation of this motor is the same as for the Bafang and Tonsheng and it is compatible with a 68mm-73mm bottom bracket shell.

Conclusion

It’s a bit early in the day to comment on the long-term reliability of this motor, but early indications suggest this is a worthwhile alternative to the Bafang and Tonsheng. The price is a little more than the TSDZ2 and a bit cheaper than the Bafang BBS02, so it seems to be good value for money.

Check the best price on Aliexpress

On top of that, the supplier is confident enough in the product to offer a 2 year warranty, which is double what a lot of suppliers will give on the Bafang.


Conclusion – What is the Best DIY Mid-Drive e-Bike Kit?

So, is there a clear winner for the accolade of best mid-drive electric bike conversion kit?

I know, that I have my personal favourite. But ultimately we are all looking for something different and have our own personal expectations of what makes a good e-bike.

For some riders, outright speed, and the ability to zip along at 30mph without doing too much pedalling is the ideal electric bike, whereas for me personally, I want the bike to feel like an extension to my own abilities.

If I had to choose, I would go for the Tongsheng TSDZ2. For me it provides the right balance of power, combined with the intuitive, torque-sensing pedal assist.

Tongsheng TDZ2 250w - 350w - 500w - 7502 36v 48v 52v

I also love the Bafang BBS02B 750w. The great thing about this motor, is that it’s a real Jekyll and Hyde. It is quite mellow in power level 1, giving you just a little help when you need it. But If you hit power level 9, it becomes a powerful beast, capable of over 1400w of peak power (with a 52v battery fitted).

Ultimately, it’s your decision, but make sure you check your bikes compatibility first. Next we move on to rear wheel hub motors. These are generally a lot cheaper and a lot more straightforward to install.


Best Rear Wheel Electric Bike Conversion Kits

If you are looking for a more affordable and easier to install electric bike conversion kit, then it would be worth considering a rear hub motor kit.

These kits usually come laced into a rim, and all you need to do is replace your bikes regular wheel with the motorised wheel and fit ancillary components like the display, pedal sensor, motor controller (ECU) and, of course the battery!

What are the benefits of a rear hub motor? Well, they are usually cheaper than their mid-drive counterparts and (in my experience) generally more reliable. Most hub motor kits only use a cadence sensor, but there are some kits available that use a more sophisticated torque sensor.

You won’t have anything like the efficiency of a mid-drive (or torque) which means you will need to consider your mileage requirements as a hub motor will get through a battery quicker than a mid-drive.

Here is my selection of the top 5 best rear wheel electric hub motor conversion kits.

1. Bafang 500w 48v Rear Wheel e-Bike Conversion Kit

 

500w 48v bafang rear hub motor kit

Bafang have been a global leader in electric bike components for some years now and their geared hub motors are among the best available. They are so good, in fact that a lot of e-bike manufacturers uses their hub motors in factory electric bikes.

Unlike their direct drive counterparts, the geared hub motor is not only more efficient, but produces a lot more torque (very important for hill climbing).

The Bafang hub motor is generally also very reliable, while at the same time offering top class performance. The motor is a little nosier due to the planetary gears, but the noise minimal.

The 500w 48v Bafang kit contains everything you need apart from a battery.

What’s included in the kit

  • 500w 48v Bafang 8fun geared hub motor – laced into a 24″ / 26″ / 27.5″ or 28″ wheel
  • Motor controller
  • Motor controller bag
  • LCD Display
  • Thumb throttle
  • Pedal assist sensor
  • E-Brakes  (for cable brakes only)
  • Motor to controller extension cable and wiring loom

Is this kit easy to install?

Installation is the same as for the other hub motor.  You will need certain tools, and a bicycle stand will definitely come in handy. Basically you would swap out your standard rear wheel for this one and fit the display to your handlebars. The pedal sensor fits on the left hand side (non-drive) over the bottom bracket axle, and the motor controller goes into a frame-mounted plastic box.

Buy the 48v 500w Bafang hub motor kit from eBay

The connectors on this kit are of the higo type (which a waterproof) and make for a very neat installation.

On some bikes it may be necessary to file out the rear drop-outs to accommodate the larger axle of the hub motor. You should always buy a torque arm, as this will help prevent the rear wheel from popping out of the drop-outs.

This kit will require a 48v e-bike specific Lithium battery pack, with a continuous rating of preferably 20A. This will need to be connected to the controller – ensuring the red (+) and black (-) wires are not mixed up.

bafang 500w 48v hub motor installed on a Giant XTC mountain bike

What bikes are compatible?

This kit is available in various wheel sizes from 24″ up to 28″ (700c). As with all hub motors, If your bike has thru-axles then this kit would not be compatible. As with all external pedal sensors, the kind of bottom bracket your bike has is important. This pedal sensor that comes with this kit would  not be compatible with a Shimano Hollowtech ll or SRAM GPX BB. If you have this type of bottom bracket then you will need a special pedal sensor.

Conclusion

The Pasion eBike 500w 48v Bafang  hub motor kit, is one of the best on the market. It is incredibly efficient, and provides loads of torque for helping you up those steep hills. Another good point worthy of note, is when the motor is switched off or on level ‘0’ you can pedal your bike normally, without any increase in drag or resistance.

Check Price on Amazon

The other great thing about these motors is their durability. Geared hub motors can sometimes suffer from wear of the planetary gears (which are usually made of nylon), but with the Bafang hub motor it doesn’t seem too much of a problem – be warned though. If you choose upgrade this motor with a more powerful controller and battery, it will increase the likelihood of premature planetary gear failure.

As with all hub motors, you will need to check and tighten the spokes regularly, and definitely make sure you fit a good puncture resistant tyre like a Schwalbe Marathon Plus – to save on time consuming roadside puncture repairs.

I have fitted a lot of these kits, and to date I haven’t experienced any long-term issues.

This is certainly not the cheapest electric bike conversion kit available, but the Bafang 8fun hub motor is smooth, powerful and generally reliable, plus  I like the flexibility of a geared hub motor, as they are much easier to pedal with the motor switched off.


2. Ebikeling 36v 500w Geared Front or Rear Hub Motor Ebike Conversion Kit

 

ebikeling 36v 500w front or rear geared hub motor electric bike conversion kit

This kit 36v 500w ebike conversion kit is supplied by Ebikeling – an American company based in Illinois.

It uses a geared hub motor, very similar in design to the Bafang motor. These kits are available in front or rear wheel versions and popular 26″ or 700c wheel sizes.

What’s included in the kit

  • 500w 36v Ebikeling geared hub motor – laced into a 26″ or 28″ front or rear wheel
  • Motor controller
  • Choice of LED or LCD display
  • Choice of thumb or twist throttle
  • Pedal assist sensor
  • E-Brakes  (for cable brakes only)
  • Motor to controller extension cable and wiring loom
  • Torque arm

Is this kit easy to install?

Installation is the same as with the other hub motors.

The connectors on this kit are of the higo type (which a waterproof) and make for a very neat installation.

On some bikes it may be necessary to file out the rear drop-outs to accommodate the larger axle of the hub motor. As with all hub motors, there is a chance of the rear wheel from popping out of the drop-outs, so a torque arm is recommended.

This kit does not include a battery, so you will also need to purchase a separate 36v Lithium battery pack.

Buy the Ebikeling 36v 500w kit on eBay

What bikes are compatible?

This kit is available in 26″ and 28″ (700c). As with all hub motors, If your bike has thru-axles then this kit would not be compatible. As I have mentioned previously, the external pedal sensors supplied with most of these kits are not compatible with a Shimano Hollowtech ll or SRAM GPX BB. If you have this type of bottom bracket then you will need a special pedal sensor specifically made for this Hollowtech ll.

Conclusion

The Ebikeling 36v 500w hub motor is an excellent quality motor for the price. It is also very efficient and robust, plus it provides a lot of torque for such a small motor (making those hills a doddle).  As with any geared hub motor you can pedal your bike easily with the motor off, without any increase in drag or resistance. The top speed is approximately 20mph, which is within the US federal law requirements.

Check price on Amazon

Maintenance is the same as other hub motors, you will need to check and tighten the spokes regularly, and preferably fit a good puncture resistant tyre like the e-bike rated Schwalbe Marathon Plus – to save on annoying roadside puncture repairs.


3. Ncyclebike 48v 1500w Electric Bike Conversion Kit

1500w electric bike kitThe Ncyclebike 1500w ebike conversion kit uses a simple ‘direct drive’ hub motor. Direct drive hub motors are the simplest and most reliable form of electric propulsion for a bicycle. I have written an article about these motors and how they work.

If you want to turn your ordinary mountain bike or hybrid into a fast electric bike, then this kit is a great starting point.

What’s included in the kit

  • Direct drive electric hub motor laced into a 20″ / 24″/ 26″ / 27.5″ / 28″ rear wheel
  • 48v 35A smart controller
  • Motor controller bag
  • LCD Display
  • Throttle
  • Pedal assist sensor
  • E-Brakes
  • Cable ties

Please note: This kit does not include a battery – you can find a list of electric bike batteries here.

Is this kit easy to install?

Installation is fairly straightforward, you will need certain tools, and a bicycle stand would come in handy. Basically you would swap out your standard rear wheel for this one and fit the display to your handlebars. The pedal sensor fits on the left hand side (non-drive) over the bottom bracket axle, and the motor controller goes into a frame-mounted bag.


On some bikes it may be necessary to file out the rear drop-outs to accommodate the larger axle of the hub motor. You should always buy a torque arm, as this will help prevent the rear wheel from popping out of the drop-outs.

Assuming you have purchased and e-bike specific Lithium battery pack, this will need to be connected to the controller – ensuring the red (+) and black (-) wires are not mixed up.

A lot of time will be spent cable tying up all the wires, and making a nice clean and tidy finish.

What bikes are compatible?

This kit is usually available in 20″ / 24″ / 26″ / 27.5″ and  28″ wheel sizes. A Fat Bike version is also available.

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If your bike has thru-axles then the motor would not fit. The other thing to consider is the kind of bottom bracket (BB) your bike has. If it is a standard square-tapered BB, then you will be fine. If you have a Shimano Hollowtech ll or SRAM GPX BB, then you will need a special Hollowtech compatible pedal sensor specifically made for this type of BB.

Conclusion

Direct drive hub motors are heavy, inefficient and difficult to pedal without power, but when you have 1500w on tap, they can be great fun! You should only install this kit on a bike with decent components, like hydraulic brakes and good suspension.

Buy similar 1500w ebike conversion kits on eBay

The motor itself should be maintenance-free, but you will need to tighten the spokes regularly, and I advise fitting a good puncture resistant tyre like a Schwalbe Marathon Plus – You do not want to be trying to remove the rear wheel at the side of the road, as it can be a right pain (and time consuming). The Schwalbe Marathon Plus is also one of the few tyres rated for e-bike use.

I have fitted lots of these kits, and there have been very few long-term issues. I personally prefer geared hub motors, but if it’s value for money you’re after, then these 1500w kits are hard to beat!

If you want to build a fairly powerful off-road e-bike on a tight budget, then I would say this kit is worth a punt, but don’t forget to factor in a decent 48v battery into the price – you will need  battery that has a continuous rating of least 30A (amps).


4. Ebikeling 48v 1200w e-Bike Conversion Kit

Ebikeling 48v 1200w front wheel electric bike conversion kit

Another great e-bike conversion kit by Ebikeling. Just like all of their other kits this 48v 1200w direct drive motor is available in front or rear wheel options, and has the choice of an LED or LCD display.

It’s true that the Ebikeling kits are not the cheapest available, but the quality is second to none and customer support from the company is also excellent.

If I was looking for a direct drive hub motor, I would much rather pay a few extra dollars, and get one of these great kits.


As far as performance goes, the 1200w 48v motor provides more than enough power to take you along at a comfortable 30mph on the flat. You can also fit a 52v battery for optimum performance. They also do a 1500w version of this motor. 

Buy the 1200w Ebikeling Kit on eBay – UK and EU Shipping

Conclusion

If you’re after a high quality direct drive hub motor kit that includes everything you need apart from a battery, then this offering from Ebikeling is one of the best ebike conversion kits available for the price. The build quality and finish are excellent and the motor is guaranteed to be durable and reliable over very high mileages.


5. Voilamart 1000w 26″ Rear Wheel e-Bike Conversion Kit

 

voilamart 1000w 48v ebike conversion kit rear wheel

The Voilamart 1000w 26″ rear wheel direct drive, e-bike conversion kit offers exceptional value for money. In fact out of all the kits reviewed in this article, this one definitely offers the best bang for your buck!

Unfortunately it is only available in 26″ rear wheel format, which shouldn’t be too much of a problem as most older mountain bikes and some new ones are available with this wheel size.

mountain bike fitted with voilamart 1000w 48v electric bike conversion kit

The only thing this kit doesn’t come with (apart from a battery) is a torque-arm, I definitely recommend fitting one of these on such a powerful rear hub motor. This is a back-up safety measure and can prevent your rear wheel from popping out of the dropout.

Buy the Voilamart 48v 1000w ebike conversion kit on Amazon 

Buy the Voilamart electric bike kit on eBay

The 1000w 48v direct drive motor can be powered by either a 48v or 52v battery. If you choose to use a 52v battery, peak power will be closer to 1500w.

Conclusion

The Voilamart 1000w electric bike conversion kit is definitely good value for money. These direct drive hub motors, are generally very robust and reliable. They may not be particularly efficient, but this motor will give you enough power to hustle you along at 25 – 30mph on the flat comfortably. Definitely worth considering, if you are after something a bit faster.

You will need to purchase an additional torque arm, and the brake levers supplied with this kit are only suitable for cable operated brakes. If you have hydraulic brakes, you may want to purchase separate hydraulic brake cut-off sensors.


Conclusion – What is the Best rear wheel hub motor eBike Conversion Kit?

Having converted hundreds of bicycles to electric assist, the best rear hub motor in my opinion is the 500w Bafang. It is generally very reliable and very smooth in operation. Both of the Ebikeling kits featured above are excellent. They are well-made and you have an option of front or rear wheel hub motor, a choice of LED or LCD display and thumb or twist grip throttles. I also like the fact the company has been thoughtful enough to include the all-important torque-arm in the package.

At the cheap end of the scale we have the Voilamart 1000w rear wheel DIY e-bike kit. Although this is quite a basic kit. If you’re just after a reliable and cheap form of electric transport, then there is no cheaper way to turn your cruiser or mountain bike into an ebike.

Whatever you decide have fun and ride safe!

Thank you for taking the time to read this article, if you have any questions regarding compatibility of the electric bike conversion kit featured. Please leave a comment below and I will respond within 24hrs.

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33 thoughts on “Best eBike Conversion Kits in 2020

  • October 18, 2020 at 8:02 pm
    Permalink

    Tony,

    I have 2 questions for you. I have a E-bike that I bought used with a BBS2 750 watt motor on it (in general I love it on the flats)..Its on a single speed beach cruiser now but I want to swap it out to a bike with speeds. I live in a hilly area and I tow a surfboard trailer at times. Right now the bike makes it up the hill but I have to pedal with considerable force to make it. How many speeds would you recommend? Are the NuVinci hubs worth the money for an Ebike? Also I don’t know how many volts my battery is…its bolted to the frame. I only have access to the charging port.

    My 2nd question is I have a 11 yr old daughter that I want to get her an Ebike.. Mostly she needs it to get back up the hills after being at the beach all day. I am worried about giving her something with too much power, and I don’t want her to get lazy and solely rely on the motor…I still want her to exercise.

    Do you have an article on Mid Drive maintenance? I looked around but didn’t find anything. My motor has a little rough feel when I pedal with the motor on. I don’t get that roughness when the motor is turning without me pedaling……
    I love your articles and I would greatly appreciate your advice and opinion.

    Reply
    • October 18, 2020 at 9:52 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Jim,

      I haven’t any experience fitting the NuVinci with a Bafang mid-drive, but there’s a very informative article over at electricbike.com that covers most of the popular internally geared hub systems. I have used the Shimano Nexus 7 / 8 and Alfine 8 with the BBS02B 750w without any issues. But you will need to fit a gearshift sensor and dial back the pedal assist (and throttle) start current using the configuration software and USB lead.

      The battery fitted is likely to be a 48v, or it could possibly be a 52v. The best way to confirm the voltage would be to remove the battery and use a multimeter if you have one.

      Regarding a motor for your daughter, the Tongsheng TSDZ2 250w would be perfect. It is physically smaller and lighter than the Bafang, and uses a Torque sensor – so it measures pedalling force as well as cadence. The uptake of power is very smooth and the pedal assist is very responsive to changes in effort, so you still need to pedal bit.

      I don’t have any articles on maintenance yet, but I’m planning one in the future. It sounds to me like the pedal shaft bearings may need replacing at some stage or maybe the motor just needs a drop of grease (Mobilgrease28 is the best). The bearings are fairly cheap to buy, and you will need a special tool and a bit of DIY mechanical skill. If you line up one of the crank arms with the chainstay and with you finger and thumb apply inward pressure to the crank arm, if there’s excessive play then it’s probably worn bearings.

      I hope this helps, if you need any more advice, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 3, 2020 at 9:09 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony thanks for the the information you share and the knowledge you use to help people like myself who get baffled by choice. I’ve narrowed my choice to a bafang BBS02B 750w and a 48v 17.5ah battery. I’ve done research on belt drives and would love to pair the bafang with a belt drive. I’d love your opinion on the Cube Travel Pro Trapeze 2020 or Cube Hyde Pro 2021or Boardman URB 8.9 Urban Hybrid Bike 2021. If you don’t think any of these are appropriate then I’d love your thoughts on a suitable donor bike. Can spend about £700ish on motor etc and upto a £1000 on a bike

    Reply
    • October 4, 2020 at 11:09 am
      Permalink

      Hi Jason,

      I would be inclined to go with the Boardman as it uses the Alfine 8 – this is more durable than the Nexus 8 fitted to the Cube. I have installed a 1000w BBSHD on a bike with an Alfine 8 hub and it’s proved reliable over the long term. You will definitely need to fit a gearshift sensor – which involves removing a section of the gear cable outer.

      You will also need a programming lead and Bafang configuration software (link in article). It is recommended to reduce the ‘start current’ in the pedal assist settings to below 10% as this will greatly reduce the risk of putting excess load through the hub. There are Gates sprocket adaptors available for the Bafang motor. One more consideration is all these bikes have an ‘eccentric bottom bracket’ which is how the belt tension is adjusted. You will need to make sure this is in the right position before installing the motor, and if you ever need to re-adjust the belt tension you will need to remove the motor to do this.

      Fitting Bafang motors to any bike with an IGH and Gates drive does complicate the installation, if you’re up for the challenge it’s fine, but if you want a more straightforward conversion I would go with a regular derailleur gear system.

      If you have any more questions, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 3, 2020 at 8:04 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony

    Awesomely useful site! I’m building an E-bike using an old Marin Bear Valley which wasn’t getting use any more. I’d like to go 35-60 miles in a day but I find I’m struggling on hills a bit due to age. I’ve purchased a Tongsheng TSDZ2 motor and also a Hailong-3 48v 16Ah 1200W battery. This seems a reasonable combination but the description is a bit confusing. I haven’t assembled it yet as I’m still waiting for some more parts but I still have a nagging doubt about whether this battery is suitable. The description says it fits motors with a power of 500W, 750W 100W and 1200W but it says it’s not compatible with motors greater than 1000W (I’m left confused about that) It also says the BMS: 30 Amp continuous 60±5Amp maximum. What’s a BMS? I still have difficulty getting my head round watts, volts and amps so I’m left wondering. Is there anything I should bear in mind about using this battery?

    Cheers,
    Alan

    Reply
    • October 3, 2020 at 12:09 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Alan,

      It sounds as though the battery you’ve purchased will be more than adequate for the job. The 48v TSDZ2 draws a maximum of 16A, so a 30A continuous discharge rate will be fine. The BMS is the battery management system, this is like the brains of the battery (CPU) and regulates voltage and current, it also provides a number of failsafe functions to prevent things like overheating, overcharging and discharging (which can be harmful to the battery chemistry).

      I have written a separate article explaining the basic’s of e-bike batteries here.

      If you have any more questions, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • October 4, 2020 at 7:55 am
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,

        Thanks for getting back so quickly, I can relax now thanks to your advice! An yes, BMS, obvious really, not sure why I missed that.

        t’s a bit nerve racking spending so much and hoping for the best but it’s an interesting project and I’m reasonably confident with bike mechanics.

        Again,, many thanks for all the inspirational material on your website.

        Cheers,
        Alan

        Reply
        • October 4, 2020 at 10:34 am
          Permalink

          Hi Alan,

          You’re welcome, glad you like the website. If you ever need any more advice, give me a shout.

          Cheers,
          Tony

          Reply
  • August 9, 2020 at 8:03 am
    Permalink

    Tony,
    I wondered where you are located? I travel to New Zealand every year. I am thinking about buying a good mountain/hybrid bike and then fitting an appropriate conversion kit. Bafang looks the best bet. It could be that I buy the bike here or in NZ and then have the kit fitted. I am not technologically experienced. My priorities on this are a long battery life and therefore most ,miles per charge. I am 72 and have used an bike extensively in New Zealand, in fact I got around Napier by bike every day. A good one is what I want. Buying here would probably be cheaper and then pay the transportation costs. Also I would know exactly what I have bought. There are sellers in say China, but communication and transport costs might be an issue. Regards,
    Phil Cooper

    Reply
    • August 9, 2020 at 9:55 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Phil,

      There are quite a few companies based in NZ who sell Bafang motors, notably Dillinger.nz and e2bikes.nz. I wouldn’t like to say how much shipping a whole bike to New Zealand would cost, but the main problem would be finding a courier who will ship the battery. In my experience, unless you are using a commercial channel, shipping e-bike batteries internationally can be a right pain! As far as a good donor bike is concerned, if you don’t mind spending a few quid then the Giant Roam ‘0’ or ‘1’ are excellent donor bikes (if you can find one). They’re hybrids, but more than suitable for riding rough terrain, single track and gravel. The Riverside 920 by Decathlon is also very good (but currently out of stock).

      E-bike conversion kits (particularly Bafang) are very popular in NZ and I wouldn’t have thought you’d have too much trouble finding someone to fit and maintain the motor for you. I am based down in Cornwall, so unless you’re in the South West I’m probably quite a distance from you.

      I hope this info helps, if you have any more questions, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 23, 2020 at 2:09 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    thank you for the articles on your site especially this one and your “Bafang BBS02 Review – How Reliable is it?” As with many other people I find myself asking you questions as you seem knowledgeable and approachable and I’m faced with the monumental task of finding a suitable set up. Unfortunately I am overwhelmed with what is out there.

    I love do it yourself projects and had set my sights on a Bafang 750w motor and a 48v 17.5Ah battery but as always I think I’m over thinking now.

    Anyway I thought I’d go back to basics and do some type of needs analysis. I tried my friend’s cube REACTION HYBRID Pro 500 Allroad 500w battery with Bosch CX motor around some hills where we work. I was amazed, I loved it but because I’d only ridden normal bikes before it felt like there was some resistance when pedaling normally. I ummed and arrred and then it was lockdown. I have a feeling that this resistance is a typical characteristic of mid drive motors. I’m sure I could overcome my concerns and it would become “normal” as I didn’t dismiss it out of hand. With the research I have conducted I’m not sure if I want a rear or front hub but I have not ruled them out totally.

    Any way long story short…
    1. There are a lot of hills where I’m live in Yorkshire! In fact this is why I stopped riding my Giant seek 0 (zero) but which I would love to convert. Is this a suitable donor bike?

    2. This bike has a shimano alfine 8 speed internal rear hub (I think that is one of the reasons I don’t want a rear wheel conversion) if I can convert would you recommend I also fit a shift sensor. All the videos I see have bikes with derailleurs but I hazard a guess the principle is the same. Also would I need to substitute the standard chain ring (I’ve seen that done a few times also)

    3. I’m 17st and I’m not sure if I should go for a 750w or 1000w? As for range I’m not sure what I’ll do but ideally I’d like to ride to work 20 mile hilly round trip and go out at the weekends and do possibly 50-60 mile round trips

    4. Also in your 2020 review you talk about the Tongsheng TSDZ2 and Bafang Mid-Drive and that the Tongsheng TSDZ2 has Bosch-like performance as in there is a direct correlation between force applied to the pedals and level of assistance. Aren’t the Bafang motors like this?

    To tell you the truth I just can’t wait to get started but I don’t want to make the mistake of giving my money to a company and not getting the kit that will convert into an enjoyable riding experience. I’m in a fortunate position that I do not have to consider price alone as the determining factor. I’m not saying I have no limits but I’m prepared to pay a little extra for the right motor, battery and display set up for my needs.

    Stay safe, thanking you in advance

    Reply
    • June 23, 2020 at 10:45 am
      Permalink

      Hi Richie,

      The 48v BBS02B 750w running a 48v battery and the max current limited to 18A is a good configuration – you will need a USB programming lead with free software and programming guide.

      I have used the Bafang BBS02 and BBSHD on bikes with the Shimano Nexus and Alfine 8 hubs without issues – fitting the gearshift sensor is essential to avoid premature wear in the hub.

      Regarding compatibility on the Giant Seek 0 – the eccentric bottom bracket could prove troublesome. I have successfully installed the Bafang on bikes with these kind of BB’s before, but never on a Giant Seek, so I can’t say with certainty it would fit.

      It’s very unlikely the TSDZ2 would fit, if you do have an eccentric BB.

      If you’re planning on 50-60 mile trips a 48v 17.5Ah battery should be more than adequate – I used to get 80 miles average out of my Bafang 750w when I had it.

      The pedal assist on the Bafang and Tongsheng are quite different. The Bafang measures pedalling speed (cadence) and the TSDZ2 measures force and cadence via a torque sensor (like the Bosch motor) – this is great and provides a very smooth and intuitive pedalling sensation, but this part can be prone to premature failure.

      I personally think the Bafang BBS02B 750w when programmed correctly can offer a very smooth and enjoyable ride, plus it will give you more than enough power to get you up any hill. The trade-off is there is a little resistance with the motor switched off – although I used to frequently ride 10 miles without assist and didn’t find it too much of a hindrance.

      Here is a link to the Bafang seller on eBay UK – I have purchased from this company many times before and have rarely had any problems (plus you have eBay’s buyer protection as a fall-back).

      One last thing you may want to purchase is a stabiliser bar – this prevents the motor from spinning in the bottom bracket. This is something that tends to happen over time as the mounting plate doesn’t do a particularly good job of keeping the motor in place.

      If you visit my YouTube channel, there are a few Bafang videos on there including on of me riding a Giant Roam 0 fitted with an Alfine 8.

      Here is the link to my YT channel.

      If you have any more questions, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 22, 2020 at 10:20 am
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    Dear Tony,

    Congratulations on the fantastic site, with so much information and valid tips.
    We are 2 friends from Portugal, who are thinking about transforming our bikes (Merida Big Nine XT edition 29 and an Orbea Alma H30, 27.5- both with front suspension only) and we don’t have much experience. We are mountain bike riders , some with some inclination covering an average of 40/50 km per training. But the objective is to do more, and allow longer trips, namely Spain, which the average would be 80/90 km daily.
    We intend to continue training but with some help 🙂
    From what we read, we are inclined towards the TSDZ2 -500W engine.
    We would like your opinion, and if you think the 500W motor is suitable and which battery to use for these kms. , mainly in Merida.

    Grateful for the help of these newbies.

    Hug and continuation of an excellent work

    Reply
    • June 22, 2020 at 2:20 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Nuno,

      I’m not sure if you saw my previous reply “I’ve had a look at the specifications on both of the bikes, and providing they have standard 68mm-73mm wide threaded bottom brackets you should be okay. The only thing I did notice is the latest models have the wider boost rear hub width (148mm), this shouldn’t cause too much of a problem with the chain-line as the TSDZ2 motor has an offset on the chainring side, but you may find shifting isn’t as smooth going up and down the cassette. My supplier UPP sells a very good compact bottle battery that fits in a regular bottle cage – it’s available in 36v 10.5Ah version which should give you a range of 50-70 km depending on how much power you use. I used to get a range of 100km + out of a 36v 13Ah battery with a 500w 36v TSDZ2 with 2000m of climbing.Here is the link for the 500w 36v TSDZ2 with VLCD6 display shipped from Spain.

      I hope this information helps. If you have any more questions, please ask.

      Glad you like my website, positive feedback is always appreciated👍

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 19, 2020 at 4:30 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony
    Great articles I have enjoyed reading them. I hope you can point me in the right direction as I am struggling to find an answer to my issues. I want to convert my Marin Nail Trail bike to electric. Due to a medical condition I haven’t ridden for 10 yrs as I cant get the bike moving from a standing start and want a e bike I that will get me moving from a stop.

    Reply
    • June 19, 2020 at 9:25 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Colin,

      I just checked the specification of the Nail Trail and there are several different models. Providing your bike has a standard threaded bottom bracket you would be best with something like a Bafang mid-drive. 250w is the legal limit in the UK, but a lot of riders don’t feel that is enough power. You can reprogram the 250w to 350w fairly easily (with a USB lead, Laptop and software) or you could buy the 500w 36v which is the best all-rounder. Here is a link to the BBS01B / BBS02B 250w / 350w / 500w. The motor kit comes with a thumb throttle that can be used independently of pedal assist, or it can be used to get you started. A good friend of mine who is nearly 70 and has knee problems finds the 500w to be excellent, he goes out on it several times a week.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 19, 2020 at 3:35 pm
    Permalink

    Tony,

    Fantastic site!!
    I have been looking ages to convert an old Specialised Rockhopper mb and a scott speedster road bike. What to you recomend? Tongsheng 250w for the Rockhopper (any issues with BB clearance and battery space?) and not sure on the speedster mid motor or rear wheel?

    I have Cube Hybrid Reaction 500! I do like the Bosch motor.

    Regards
    Peter G

    Reply
    • June 19, 2020 at 9:30 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Peter,

      You should be fine fitting a TSDZ2 to an older Rockhopper, the only thing you will need to do is completely remove the cable guide on the underside of the bottom bracket shell and re-route the rear derailleur cable.

      The Scott Speedster should also be fine for a TSDZ2 – I find the rear hub motors are okay on a road bike, but there are more external cables, wires and external pedal sensors to deal with. The Tongsheng is a much neater, more professional looking conversion, and feels similar to the Bosch motor (although not as quiet).

      I hope this helps, if you need any more advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 19, 2020 at 9:17 am
    Permalink

    Dear Tony,

    Congratulations on the fantastic site, with so much information and valid tips.
    We are 2 friends from Portugal, who are thinking about transforming our bikes (Merida Big Nine XT edition 29 and an Orbea Alma H30, 27.5- both with front suspension only) and we don’t have much experience. We are mountain bike riders , some with some inclination covering an average of 40/50 km per training.
    We intend to continue training but with some help 🙂
    From what we read, we are inclined towards the TSDZ2 -500W engine.
    We would like your opinion, and if you think the 500W motor is suitable and which battery to use for these Kms. We are afraid, by the measures (36.7 * 11 *, 901 cm) that we see that the traditional battery does not fit in the frame , mainly in Merida.

    Grateful for the help of these newbies.

    Hug and continuation of an excellent work

    Reply
    • June 19, 2020 at 11:49 am
      Permalink

      Hello Nuno,

      Thank you for your compliments, much appreciated.

      I will check the specifications of the Merida and Orbea and post a reply later today. I will find a suitable battery for your frames as well.

      The TSDZ2 36v 500w is a good motor and provides plenty of power for the average rider.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
    • June 19, 2020 at 9:43 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Nuno,

      I’ve had a look at the specifications on both of the bikes, and providing they have standard 68mm-73mm wide threaded bottom brackets you should be okay. The only thing I did notice is the latest models have the wider boost rear hub width (148mm), this shouldn’t cause too much of a problem with the chain-line as the TSDZ2 motor has an offset on the chainring side, but you may find shifting isn’t as smooth going up and down the cassette. My supplier UPP sells a very good compact bottle battery that fits in a regular bottle cage – it’s available in 36v 10.5Ah version which should give you a range of 50-70 km depending on how much power you use. I used to get a range of 100km + out of a 36v 13Ah battery with a 500w 36v TSDZ2 with 2000m of climbing.Here is the link for the 500w 36v TSDZ2 with VLCD6 display shipped from Spain.

      I hope this information helps. If you have any more questions, please ask.

      Glad you like my website, positive feedback is always appreciated👍

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 8, 2020 at 9:28 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony

    Seems like my comment from yesterday were never posted, I’ll try again! Many thanks for the in depth articles you share, very informative and helpful. I’m planning to convert my regular bike into a e-bike. What kit would you recommend me for my following requirements:

    1. Pedal assistant
    2. Long range (battery)
    3. Reliability (It will be my main transport for work, ~ 20-30 km / daily)
    4. Possible to bike “normally” with motor off for health purposes

    I have fairly flat roads without any steep uphills.

    Thanks
    /Max

    Reply
    • June 8, 2020 at 12:35 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Max,

      I would say the best option for you would be a 250w rear wheel electric bike conversion kit. Geared rear hub motors are easier to pedal with the assist switched off (than retro-fit mid-drives) and also lighter in weight. They are also much more reliable and easy to fix if they do go wrong (unlikely).

      In my experience of fitting e-bike kits hub motors are by far the most reliable.

      For a battery capable of an assisted range of about 60-70 miles you will be looking at something like a 36v 17.5Ah – more powerful batteries are available if you require a greater range. I recently installed a 36v 20.4Ah battery on a hub conversion and the customer has reported a range of just over 100 miles off a single charge.

      If you can let me know the make / model and tyre size of your bike, I can point you in the direction of a suitable kit and battery.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • May 31, 2020 at 10:27 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    i see your webiste and is awesome,very clear,full of resource and usefuel!

    I will buy a mtb and after i will convert to e-bike with bafang kit this is the cycle:

    https://www.cube.eu/it/2020/bikes/mountainbike/hardtail/aim/cube-aim-race-rednorange-2020/

    But i’m confused about 44T?46T?52T? dimension?Wich is correct for this bike?

    I m interested about 500w or 750w,then best battery for this kit?Wich configuration is the best and affordable?

    I’m newbie about this.

    Thank you so much.

    Sorry for my english but i’m italian

    Reply
    • May 31, 2020 at 12:08 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Massimo,

      I have converted several Cube Aim hardtail mountain bikes. The best chainring to go with for general riding is the 44T. If you want a higher speed and are riding on more flat ground a 46T may be better. If you go with a 46T it is likely you will need a longer chain.

      This supplier on Amazon.it has good feedback and supplies the BBS02B 750w with a choice of 48v 11.6Ah and 48v 17.5Ah batteries. The size of battery you need really depends on the kind of range you are looking for. A 48v 17.5Ah battery will give you a potential range of over 100km.

      With the Cube Aim, because of the design of the frame down tube (with internal cable routing) you will find the motor will hang down at a 45 degree angle.

      If you need any more help, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • May 20, 2020 at 9:12 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony

    We’re planning to get a front-wheel conversion kit, and are thinking of the ReaseJoy 36V 500W 26 inch Front Wheel Bicycle Motor Conversion Kit. We don’t need anything fancy, but robust. We stay in the Highlands and would be using it for travel around the area. What do you reckon of that make please?
    And could you also help with what might be the best battery to go with that?
    Many thanks
    The Boyd family

    Reply
    • May 21, 2020 at 8:23 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Tom,

      The ReaseJoy kit is okay if you don’t need anything too fancy and you’re not planning on covering large distances. In my experience they tend to be reliable (and provide decent performance), but they are heavy and inefficient. If your bikes have front disc brakes, there can be problems with the brake caliper rubbing on the outer motor casing. I would also advise buying torque-arms – these fit around the motor axle and prevent the wheel from popping out of the drop-outs.

      A suitable battery that would give you a range of approximately 20-25 miles would be a 36v 13Ah here is a link for one on eBay.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • May 1, 2020 at 8:46 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony
    I have been browsing the web for a while now and I always seem to end back on your site. It really has some excellent information and good articles.

    Now to my question. I am in the process of converting my 3 wheeled cargo bike. The goal is help on the hills and when setting off – not to go particular fast. Going more than 25 km/h is pretty interesting, most of the time will be cruising speeds of approx 15 km/h. The bike without anything in it weighs about 30kg, myself + 2 kids will bring the total weight to 150kg+
    I already tried a Tongsheng TZSD2 with a 36V 14,5Ah battery. But unfortunately it will not fit the bike without (a lot of) modification to the frame. So I have scratched that idea and am now looking into a rear hub motor.

    I like the Bafang kit you’re presenting here, but I’m wondering if the kit is available in 36V and 24” rim? That way I could use the battery I already have. But if the 48V kit is a much better piece of kit, I’d rather spend a bit extra. If possible I’d like it if it were a kit that was legal in the EU (i think 250W max).

    My bike has hydraulic disc in the front and I plan to fit a hydraulic disc on the rear wheel as well. Is it an absolute must to fit brake cut off sensors? Many bikes in Denmark do not have them these days, so I’m wondering if the PAS is sufficient? Will the kit even run without the cut off connected?

    Are there any sellers you can recommend? I am having a hard time finding sellers that offer bafang in 24”. I am in Denmark so sellers with either EU stock or that offer shipping with taxes prepaid would be my preference.

    Thanks in advance
    Frederik

    Reply
    • May 2, 2020 at 2:34 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Frederik,

      Yes, the Bafang motor is available in 36v 250w version, but it is difficult to get from within the EU in a 24″ wheel. The other option would be to purchase the hub motor kit (without wheel) and get a local bike shop to lace the motor into a 24″ rim – my local bike shop offers this service for a reasonable price.

      I haven’t found any hub motor only kits in Europe, one of my regular suppliers sells them, but they ship from China and delivery usually takes approximately 14-21 working days. Here is the link if you are interested. I have found another full Bafang 36v 250w rear wheel kit (including 24″ wheel) from a different supplier – here is the link for that one.

      Regarding the hydraulic brake sensors, I have only ever used them on bikes that are fitted with a separate throttle. If you are just using PAS, it won’t be necessary.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 4, 2020 at 10:01 pm
    Permalink

    Hallo Tony,

    Dies ist eine Wunderbare Seite. Ich lese mich schon seit Tagen hinein und habe Lust von mal zu mal mehr E-bikes zu bauen. Nur fange ich gerade an und bin noch nicht mit den Besonderheiten von Fahrrädern vertraut und als Anfänger ist es nicht so leicht bei allen Sachen wie Kettenpaket oder Presslager durchzublicken.
    Ich habe nämlich ein tolles Fahrrad bekommen:
    https://www.thebikelist.co.uk/felt/redemption-3-2010
    Nur bin ich mir nicht sicher ob der Bafang BBS02 hier dazu passt oder ob ich wegen des gepressten Tretlagers nicht doch lieber ein Hinterradmotor von Bafang einbauen sollte. Den da habe ich ein Standard-Ausfallenden (135mm breit) Hinterteil. Aber da weiß ich nicht ob ich nun ein Kassette oder Freilauf habe. Ich glaube Kassette.

    Bafang finde ich schon Klasse. Nur bin ich mir unsicher ob es dann passt.

    Vielen dank schonmal von einen E-bike neuling.
    Mit freundlichsten Gruß
    Mark

    Reply
    • April 5, 2020 at 5:56 pm
      Permalink

      Hallo Mark,

      Vielen Dank für Ihre positiven Kommentare, sehr geschätzt.

      Ich habe die Spezifikation Ihres Fahrrads überprüft und es verwendet ein Truvativ Howitzer Tretlager, das laut weiteren Untersuchungen auf ein Standard-BSA 68mm-73mm Tretlagergehäuse passt. Dies würde bedeuten, dass der Bafang BBS02 leicht genug passen sollte. Sie benötigen ein Spezialwerkzeug, um das Tretlager zu entfernen, und Sie benötigen eine Batterie, die in den begrenzten Rahmenraum passt.

      Ihr Fahrrad verwendet eine Kassette. Wenn Sie sich also für einen Bafang-Hinterradnabenmotor entscheiden, möchten Sie einen mit einem eingebauten Kassetten-Freilauf.

      Wenn Sie weitere Ratschläge benötigen, lassen Sie es mich bitte wissen.

      Grüße,
      Tony

      Reply
  • March 18, 2020 at 4:32 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony
    Fantastic website.
    I’m struggling to choose a kit to a 1997 Marin Rift Zone. The issue is how to fit a battery. Most “kits to fit” from UK online suppliers offer batteries that are designed to fit either into a rack or within the frame triangle. Neither is appropriate for the Rift Zone. Your website shows a picture of a conversion where a Tongsheng TSDZ2 has been put on an Orange full suspension bike, the frame configuration of which is similar to my Marin. This has the standard battery case attached under the down tube. My R.Z. has bottle cage mounts there but the clearance is quite tight vis-a-vis the front suspension movement and a bottle cage battery would be more appropriate. What I don’t understand, and can’t find any definitive statements on the web, is how you choose a battery to work with a particular motor. You give links to suppliers for motors and batteries and you say somewhere that the TSDZ2 has the controller built in to the BB motor. How do I specify a battery to work with the TSDZ2? (I am looking for a smallish battery -10-13 ah- to use occasionally to help out with the steep hills, not some massive thing that will last for 50 miles).
    The other issue is whether a hub motor would be better for me. The bike is kept abroad; I don’t speak the language fluently enough to manage repairs and such like and I get the impression that the hub motors are simpler and mor reliable/robust. However I’m a longtime cyclist of many years and something in your writings make me think a torque sensor conversion would suit me better.
    Thanks (and even if you can’t help your website is a really good resource)

    Reply
    • March 18, 2020 at 8:39 pm
      Permalink

      Hi John,

      Your best bet would be a 36v10.5Ah compact bottle battery. They’re about the same size as a large water bottle and will fit in a regular bottle cage. Although I would add a velcro strap for good measure. Depending on how much travel your forks have you should get away with it. The other alternative would be a seat post mounted battery pack, or what some people do is have a small battery in a large saddle bag. Here is a link to my battery supplier, they can also custom-build batteries if required.

      Regarding motor suitability, the TSDZ2 is generally reliable (in my experience) but if they do go wrong, they can be a right pain to fix if you’re not prepared. There are hub motor kits available from China that use bottom bracket torque sensors. They basically replace the existing square-tapered BB with one that has a sensor built in. The only problem is you will need to drill a hole in the bottom bracket for the sensor lead. Here is a link to a kit I fitted in the past.

      Glad you like the website, if you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply

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