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Bafang BBSHD Review

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Since its release back in 2015/16 the Bafang BBSHD 1000w electric bike kit has proven to be a very popular among DIY e-bike enthusiasts. But does it live up to all the hype? Read this review based on my experience installing these motors on numerous different bikes.

Summary

The BBSHD is the flagship mid-drive motor from Bafang. The motor stator is 66% larger than that of the BBS02, and it runs at 130-150rpm vs 120rpm for the BBS02. The motor itself is physically larger and just under 1kg heavier and it has external cooling fins that aid with heat dissipation.  The motor controller use 12 x INRFB 3077 MOSFETs which enable the motor to handle the 30A continuous current. Power-wise, it can produce up to 160N.m of torque (compared with 120N.m for the o2).

bafang bbshd with a choice of 48v or 52v battery

 

At the bottom of this article are some useful links on where to buy the Bafang BBSHD from various locales.

The installation criteria is the same as with all Bafang mid-drives and is available in the classic 68mm-73mm bottom bracket fitment – there is also a couple of versions made specifically for the wider bottom brackets used on fat bikes (100mm or 120mm).

b'twin rockrider 540 hardtail mountain bike fitted with a bafang bbshd

There is the potential to fit this kit to a full suspension mountain bike that uses a pressed-fit bottom bracket, although you will need to purchase the correct shim adaptor kit and motor stabiliser bar, or if you know a good engineer, you could get one fabricated.

If you want a high performance electric mountain bike, then this is the kit for you.

The motor kit comes with the following components:

  • The motor unit with integrated controller
  • LCD Display
  • Wiring loom
  • Inner and outer lock-nuts
  • Chainring
  • Thumb throttle
  • Brake levers with cut-off sensors (only compatible with cable brakes)
  • Speed sensor and wheel magnet
  • A bag of various Allen bolts and screws

 

bafang bbshd 48v 1000w electric bike kit

Installation

The installation of this motor is the same as other mid drive motors. If you are looking for a nice easy conversion to do yourself, but you have little or no experience with bicycle mechanics or using tools, I would not recommend this kit.  The installation will need to be carried out by someone who is fairly competent at general bicycle maintenance. Removing the bottom bracket on your bike can be a right pain, and you will require a lot of patience! I have added a downloadable PDF manual that gives a rough idea of the installation process with photos.

Technical Data

The BBSHD 1000w produces considerably more torque than its smaller siblings, the controller will handle up to 30A of continuous current all day long and the motor internals are much more robust.

As with all the other Bafang  mid-drive motors, this uses an internal cadence sensor, and gives electric assist based on pedalling rpm. The pedal assist is very responsive and with 9 power levels to choose from, you can really fine-tune the power output to suit your ride.

The table below states the maximum possible power output for the 48v and 52v battery.

BafangBatteryPeak Power
BBSHD48v (54.4v) x 30A
1632w
BBSHD52v (58.8v) x 30A1764w
The voltage figures in brackets are for a fully-charged battery. Note: As the voltage drops, so will the power.

 

The kit is supplied with a thumb throttle, so the bike can be used like an electric motorcycle if desired. I find these throttles are not particularly good for modulating the power, and function more like an on/off switch. Reprogramming the controller can make the throttle more user-friendly. There are also aftermarket twist throttles available.

Below is a video of a quick throttle test I performed on one of my conversions.

The firmware settings in the BBSHD controller can be re-configured with a suitable USB programming lead and software (which you can download for free here). You should exercise caution with this as some settings should be left alone. For more information on how to correctly program a Bafang, the Endless Sphere forum is an excellent source of knowledge.

This motor works on the same principle as the other Bafang kits and drives the rear wheel directly through a single front chainring. Gear selection is always important to maintain maximum motor efficiency when hill climbing.  Using a high gear on a very steep climb will place an unnecessary load on the controller and could potentially cause premature failure.

Reliability

One of the main reasons I decided to do this review of the Bafang BBSHD, is that I have had a lot of experience installing these kits on to mountain bikes, that have all been used off-road, in testing conditions.

bafang bbshd motor

Out of the thirty kits I have installed, there have been three controller failures and one hall sensor failure. Generally speaking this motor is very reliable and seems to put up with a lot of abuse. Most of the installations I have carried out have used 52v batteries, which when fully charged are around 58.8v, this is very close to the motor controller’s maximum operating voltage of 60v. The only controller failures I’ve had, have been on bikes that had a 52v battery fitted. I have never had any issues with the motors that used 48v batteries.

The motor still uses a nylon primary gear, that can degrade over time (particularly with heavy use). Replacements are easy enough to find, and there are plenty of good tutorials on YouTube for stripping this motor down.

Things to consider

  • I would personally stick with a 48v battery, as the power gained by using a 52v battery is minimal, and in my opinion is not worth the risk.
  • As with all of the Bafang motors, you will need a specific motor lock-ring spanner – the BBSHD is especially prone to coming loose in the bottom bracket due to the torque of the motor.
  • The speed sensor can be easily knocked out of alignment with the wheel magnet – this will throw up an error code and pedal assist will stop working.
  • Some colour displays can be unreliable – I find the black and white C965 display to be the most reliable, although the latest DP-C18 colour display is very good.
  • I would definitely recommend fitting a Bafang gearshift sensor, with potentially over 1600w going to the rear wheel, you will drastically shorten the service life of your rear derailleur, cassette and chain.
  • A heavy-duty chain is definitely recommended – there is a lot of torque going to the back wheel.
  • If you are planning on keeping the bike long term, it may be worth stocking up on some spare parts. It is always useful to have a spare controller and a nylon primary gear.

Riding a Bafang powered Electric Bike

bafang bbshd mid drive motor kit fitted to a fat bike

The motor is very quiet and silky smooth, the first thing you notice when riding, is the amazing amount of torque it produces. I have ridden across a steep-sloped muddy field on a BBSHD powered Fat Bike and the thing just kept on pulling like a train! For me personally I think it’s a bit too much power for a bicycle, but the great thing about these motors, is that you can use them in a low assist mode like a normal bike, taking it nice and easy. The flip side is if you crank the power up to level 9, it feels like an electric motorcycle! You definitely need to wear full protective clothing and a decent crash helmet when riding one of these off-road.

This kit comes as standard with a 46t steel chainring. This, in my opinion is too higher gearing, especially if you are climbing lots of steep hills. There are however aftermarket chainrings available or a 130BCD chainring adapter.


One thing you will have to be aware of, is if you do fit a smaller front chainring, the lowered gearing will make the bike prone to power wheelies, especially when hitting full throttle in a low gear on a steep hill start – I have had personal experience of this!

If you want to fit the brake levers with cut-off sensors, then bear in mind that these are only suitable for cable operated brakes. I would only recommend installing this kit on a bike with decent hydraulic brakes. Because this motor is so powerful, I would recommend the hydraulic brake cut off sensors or completely new hydraulic brakes with the sensors already built in.

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Conclusion

This motor is great fun! And although it is not without its faults, it is in my opinion the best mid-drive kit available. It is very powerful and should only be installed on a decent bike, with good brakes and suspension. It can only be legally ridden on private land (in certain countries), and should be treated with respect. It is without a doubt, great fun and is guaranteed to put a smile on your face!

I have been as honest as possible in this review of the Bafang BBSHD, and despite some of the faults, it is definitely a great electric bike conversion kit.  As long as you can accept the potential long-term maintenance that will inevitably need to be carried out, it is an outstanding motor and well worth the money!

Below are links to the the Bafang BBSHD from Aliexpress and various Amazon locales. For a list of spare parts click here.

AliExpress.com Product – Bafang Motor BBSHD 1000w BBS02B 750w BBS01B 250w BBS01 BBS02 Mid Drive Motor Electric Motor Bicycle Conversion Kit

Buy the Bafang BBSHD 1000w

bafang bbshd 48v 1000w electric bike kit
Buy on Aliexpress
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Bafang BBSHD 1000w

8

Value for Money

9.0/10

Ease of Installation

6.0/10

Efficiency

9.0/10

Pros

  • Performance - This kit rocks!
  • Very efficient
  • Excellent Value for Money

Cons

  • Can be difficult to install for the inexperienced
  • Long-term maintenance required
  • The extra power can be hard on bike gear components

43 thoughts on “Bafang BBSHD Review

  • October 25, 2020 at 2:57 pm
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    Hi there. Thank you very much for a great review. I am actually very close to buying this kit but I have a few questions before I do.

    I have bought a slightly used “Scott sub sport 30” https://tinyurl.com/yy29wclr
    I will mostly be using this bike on flat roads with the hope of getting to my destinations as fast as possible (though I of course know it is not legal to use on public roads…)

    – Chainring size:
    Having previously owned a middrive speed pedelec (specialized turbo vado 6.0 – got stolen…) which had a 11 speed 11-46 cassette and a 48t chainring I found that you were almost always in the 11t cog when going fast.
    Therefore I am considering installing the Lekkie Bling Ring 52t https://tinyurl.com/y6ghhfo9

    Do you think the bigger chainring will give problems in regards to the motor or visa versa? Will it even fit standard frames?

    -Battery:
    Will buying a 48V battery give any edge in regards to reliability compared to buying a 52V battery and reducing the amps via software?

    Wear:
    My old ebike ate chains and cassettes for breakfast. I will try a full emersion wax approach this time around. Any tips for reducing wear?

    Thank you for your time!

    Best regards, Jon.

    Reply
    • October 26, 2020 at 8:10 am
      Permalink

      Hi Jon,

      The Scott Sub Sport 30 will be an ideal donor bike, I have converted a very similar Scott in the past and it was quite straightforward.

      Regarding chainring size, I don’t see any problems using a 52t front Lekkie chainring. The BBSHD puts out loads of power, even in the lower modes, so you should comfortably be able to maintain 25mph+ on flat roads. There shouldn’t be any problem with the chainring size as the Scott has a 48t large on the standard triple crankset, the only thing you may need to do is get a slightly longer chain.

      I have found that both 48v and 52v batteries perform equally as well (in terms of reliability) with the BBSHD, the benefits of a 52v battery is the voltage will be slightly higher through the discharge cycle as the starting voltage will be 58.8v. There shouldn’t be any need to reduce the maximum current. I’ve found a lot of the latest BBSHD’s have the current set to 28A as standard.

      Regarding chain and cassette, you probably want to get a KMC or Connex e-bike specific chain, and a good all-weather chain lube. One of my customers gets nearly 2k miles out of a Shimano HG-X – but this is for a 10-speed drivetrain so the chain profile would be slightly different for a 7-speed cassette.

      I hope this helps, if you have any more questions, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 27, 2020 at 10:00 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony, me again.

    So I’ve got the bbshd installed and running with a 48v 17.5Ah battery (samsung cells). I am running the current limit at 25A, and my current peak power off a fresh charged battery is about 1250watts (As read off the dpc18 display). My concern is when i reached about 47-48v, the max power output I could reach was 500w, which seems quite low for this setup. I understand there is voltage drop off, but even on my cheap 1000w hub motor, i still get 800-900w when the battery is nearly empty! My LVC is at 41/42v. Do you think the problem could be because the controller is set up for 52v battery?

    Reply
    • August 27, 2020 at 3:36 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Jim,

      The BBSHD controller will accept a 48v or 52v battery, so there maybe some other issue. Even at 48v the power output in full power mode should be 1200w (48v x 25A) a freshly charged 48v battery should be at 54.4v so peak power off a fresh battery should be more like 1360w. It might be worth checking the ‘keep current’ setting as if this is set too low, power will quickly reduce when pedalling cadence increases. I usually set it to at least 80%, but on some controllers it is set to 50% or lower. It sounds like one or more of the settings on the config software may be restricting power. I would check your settings against ‘Karls special sauce’ on electricbike-blog.com to see how they tally up.

      Let me know how you get on.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 12, 2020 at 10:52 pm
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    Hi Tony,

    Which BBSHD size did you use for the Carrera Vulcan please?

    I realise now that asking Halfords for BB sizes was a red herring since they always quote sizes of 68-73 but the actual BB shell can be much much wider. Its hard because they just dont have the stock for me to physically inspect. I have a BBSHD on order that is probably the wrong size so I need to change it or cancel.

    Kind Regards

    Peter

    Reply
    • August 13, 2020 at 8:29 am
      Permalink

      Hi Peter,

      The Carrera Vulcan has a 73mm BB, so the standard 68-73mm BBSHD will fit. You may need to purchase a couple of spacers as the chainstay angle on the Vulcan means the inner casing of the motor will be tight up to it. It’s also likely you will need to modify the rear gear cable routing guide (under the BB) as this can sometimes get in the way when inserting the motor. The only other issue I’ve come across with Vulcan’s is there is always enough thread (on the motor axle) to fully tighten the inner lock-ring, but the outer lock-ring will only just about fit and may require some locktite.

      You will also need a good long breaker bar (1/2 inch) and Bottom bracket removal socket, as they don’t always grease the BB’s well during assembly.

      Let me know if you need any more info.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
      • August 19, 2020 at 5:06 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,

        I see what you mean about the breaker bar! I managed to get the crank and ring out of one side, with penetrating chemicals and a breaker bar, but the other side is impossible so far. I genuinely feel sorry for the guys in Halfords that have to change the bottom brackets after a few years (or months so Ive heard) Ive taken rusted bolts off the bottom of cars easier than this.

        Have you ever come accross a battery that will only charge to 66%? The new battery I ordered only seems to give me 3 green lights and the 4th stays red, plus the display screen says its only charged to 66%. Any thoughts please?

        Thanks again

        Peter

        Reply
        • August 19, 2020 at 6:38 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Peter,

          A fully charged 48v battery should read 54.4v on a multimeter or 58.8v for a 52v battery. If you have the DP-C18 display or P850c display you need to change the battery voltage in the settings menu to ‘UBE’. If you have a multimeter or you have a friend who has one, you need to check the voltage at the battery terminals. If you’ve left it on charge until the charger LED light goes green, then it should be at 100%. There could be a fault with either the charger, the battery management system (CPU inside the battery) or possibly a faulty lithium cell.

          Let me know how it goes.

          Regards,
          Tony

          Reply
          • August 20, 2020 at 6:44 pm
            Permalink

            Thanks Tony,

            Good to know, I think I was just over 54v so sounds like everything is OK. I did about 25 miles just now without much pedalling and I was still well above 40v so seems OK to me.

            I will try and change the setting, I cant find UBE, but I already had it set to Volts.

            Thanks for all of your help.

            Kind Regards

            Peter

          • August 21, 2020 at 9:49 am
            Permalink

            Hi Peter,

            Sounds like everything is okay, the UBE battery setting is under battery voltage in the advanced settings menu (on the DP-C18 and P850c), there’s a couple of PDF user manuals under the ‘resources’ tab on the menu.

            All the best,
            Tony

  • August 8, 2020 at 11:38 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    8

    Ease of Installation

    10

    Efficiency

    8

    Tony,

    Is there a new torque sensing mode for bafang mid-motor ?
    Which is easier to install and maintain, the tongsheng middle motor or the Octave middle motor?

    Thanks
    Kevin

    Reply
    • August 9, 2020 at 10:07 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Kevin,

      The Bafang motor you may be referring to is the G510 1000w M620 Max mid-drive motor. It uses torque-sensing pedal assist and is a great motor,but you will need a special bike frame specifically for the motor. The current BBSHD doesn’t support a torque sensor (to my knowledge).

      I have found the BBSHD to be very reliable in the long-term. I have just serviced one that has done over 4000 miles (6400 kms) and it is still quiet, smooth and performs as well as the day it was fitted.

      The Tongsheng is also a good motor, but does seem more prone to certain reliability issues, particularly the blue gear, sprag clutch and torque sensor – although I have never had any major issues with the TSDZ2 (out of about 40 units installed).

      As far as installation is concerned, both are fairly straightforward, although there is limited clearance on the TSDZ2 between the motor shaft and bottom bracket – meaning you may need to re-route the gear cable.

      I hope this info helps.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • July 24, 2020 at 9:13 pm
    Permalink

    Hi,

    I want to convert my Boardman CX team to electric with this kit. The problem is my bike has drop handlebars with Shimano brake levers and mechanical disc brakes. The supplied brake levers are for straight handlebar bikes. What is the solution?

    If it comes to it I can fit straight bars as the bike is only for towing the dog cart as, without the motor, I have difficulty keeping up with my wife on her electric bike. The dog cart and dog weigh about 30 kilos. I assume that this motor will cope with this. The bike weighs approximately 11kg but I have a basket and panniers for the shopping and/or sailing gear.

    Reply
    • July 25, 2020 at 9:14 am
      Permalink

      Hi,

      You can fit in-line brake cut off sensors. You will need to remove some of the brake cable outer and thread the cable through. I couldn’t find any on eBay or Amazon UK, but they can be purchased from Aliexpress – Here is the link.

      Personally, I never used the brake cut-off sensors. They are only really recommended if you use a throttle (as these can sometimes stick open).

      The BBSHD will be more than adequate for towing a trailer, just remember to keep in a low gear when climbing steep hills.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • July 6, 2020 at 7:47 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    I’m ready to pull the trigger on a bbshd, my question is should I be worried about warranty with my purchase? ie, do I buy off amazon which is about $1000aud, or do i buy off a known bike shop (which are not in my state) for about $1300?
    I don’t plan to run extreme power, will probably program it to limit it to max 1200w or so worth of power running a 48v battery, and it most certainly won’t be under a continual 1200w.
    What are your thoughts on purchase location?

    Reply
    • July 7, 2020 at 7:56 am
      Permalink

      Hi Jim,

      I’ve personally had very few problems with the BBSHD considering the amount I’ve installed over the years. I reckon if you’re going to be using it below it’s maximum output for most of the time it should prove to be very reliable.

      Regardless of whether you purchase from a company like Dillenger or Amazon, you should still have at least a 12 months warranty. I have purchased kits from Dillenger before (in the UK) and never had any issues, but they are a bit in the pricey side. I’ve heard their after sales services is pretty good.

      I hope this helps. If you need any more advice, let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • July 14, 2020 at 10:50 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,

        thanks for the reply. I bought the kit! I have seen people complain about the crank arms wearing out, is something stopping me from running my stock crank arms on the bbshd? my stock bottom bracket is a square taper with shimano arms

        Thanks

        Reply
        • July 16, 2020 at 7:57 am
          Permalink

          Hi Jim,

          You wouldn’t be able to use you stock crank arms, as the drive-side crank arm will be connected to the original crankset. The cheapest option would be to try some Shimano Steps crank arms. I know for a fact these works with the Tongsheng TSZD2, but I haven’t tested them on the BBSHD. Another option would be to try some Lekkie crank arms, they’re made in NZ specifically for the BBS02/BBSHD, so you should be able to get hold of some easily enough.

          I’ve not personally come across any problems with the Bafang crank arms. Make sure you put plenty of grease on the square-tapered axles before installing though, as the threads do tend to strip easily when using a crank puller (if you ever need to remove them for servicing the motor).

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
          • August 11, 2020 at 2:25 am
            Permalink

            Hi Tony,
            So I finally got my BBSHD with a DPC18 (the 5 level pedal assist one). Just did a bench test before i install it, I notice with a full charged battery that the voltage displays correctly however if i set it to percentage it is incorrect, is there something wrong with the battery?
            Also, when run the motor, the wattage/current draw does not show on the display, it doesn’t move, just stays at zero. Currently, only the display and throttle are connected to the motor, no brake sensor or speed sensor as i am just testing. Should the power/current draw be showing up?

          • August 11, 2020 at 9:15 am
            Permalink

            Hi Jim,

            You will need to fit the speed sensor, as the motor controller relies on this data to provide pedal assist (although it shouldn’t effect throttle control). Regarding the battery reading, the only figure you can really rely on is the real-time voltage. If you have a 52v battery fitted you will need to change battery voltage (in the settings menu) to UBE or ‘user defined’ – some DPC-18 displays have the option for a 52v. If you think there may be a problem with the battery you will need to test it with a multimeter. A fully charged 48v should read 54.4v and a 52v should read 58.8v (or thereabouts).

            The reason the motor isn’t showing any power on the display is probably because it’s being bench tested and is not under any load. If it still doesn’t display power once installed and test ridden, then the power display settings may need to be changed – there is information on how to do this in the user manual.

            Let me know how you get on and if you need any more help, let me know.

            All the best,
            Tony

          • August 13, 2020 at 6:53 am
            Permalink

            Thanks for that, I ended up contacting the distributor, and turns out the motor has the latest version firmware which is now compatible with 52v batteries, and as such current is by default limited to 28A. My multimeter voltage readings were correct for the battery, so no worries there.
            Just had another concern, should I get some sort of stabiliser bar or something? I am worried with harsh trail driving that the mount into the aluminium bottom bracket might wear out and cause damage.
            Thanks, Jim

          • August 13, 2020 at 8:20 am
            Permalink

            Hi Jim,

            Thanks for the info, that’s good to know. Regarding the stabiliser bar, I think it’s a good idea as it saves you from constantly having to re-tighten the lock-rings. In my experience most BBS motors will need re-tightening at some stage and the stabiliser bar negates the need for this. You could have one fabricated using the existing mounting plate as a template, or you could buy one from Luna Cycle. I’ve fitted a few in the past and there have been no problems with motor movement since.

            All the best,
            Tony

  • April 20, 2020 at 10:32 pm
    Permalink

    Tony:
    Thanks for the article. I have a very expensive Merlin Metalworks XLM titanium mountain bike that I am considering converting to Bafang, since I no longer race it on the xc circuit. I have read one post from someone who experienced his bottom bracket threads getting destroyed by this unit. What is your experience with such damage? Does the motor fit snugly into the bottom bracket, or is there room for it to wobble and grind away at the threads? I wrote Bafang USA and they simply suggested that they had never heard of such damage, but could not guarantee that it could not happen. They suggested that if I was concerned, that I should consider not adding this kit. Not very confidence inspiring. What do you think?

    Reply
    • April 20, 2020 at 11:25 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Glenn,
      I can only speak from personal experience, I’ve only ever converted one bike from a Bafang mid-drive back to a regular bike and that was an alloy framed CX bike. The only damage in the BB area was where the motor mounting plate had marked the alloy surrounding the BB shell. The thread itself was perfectly intact. I had covered about 2000 miles on it. Personally I wouldn’t want to risk fitting a Bafang motor to such a nice frameset. I would look for a decent used hardtail and fit the motor to that instead and keep the Merlin safe.
      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • February 29, 2020 at 10:55 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony

    My name is Jakob and I’m from Poland – I’m just starting the adventure with e-bike and immediately with BBSHD. I am still waiting for delivery, but I am slowly preparing for assembly. I have a KTM Tour tourist bike and I will use it after flat sections in the Polish mountains – but for now on paved and asphalt roads. I am looking for ‘safe’ settings (I ordered the programming cable) – the battery is 48V18Ah. I would like to have the maximum range max speed is 30-35 km / h. Due to the price of the battery, it’s also about its lifetime. Of course, most of the route with a slight amount of own participation .. Hills are dense, but they are not very high – up to 100 m in length 1 km – 2 km. What support settings have you recommended …

    Regards
    Jakob

    Reply
    • February 29, 2020 at 11:16 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Jakob,

      The settings I usually use on the BBSHD are ‘Karls Special Sauce’ – here is a link to the article with the correct programming parameters and a link to the Bafang open source software.

      I have done quite a lot of experimenting and these settings provide a nice and smooth uptake of power from the pedal assist, and due to the lowered start current, there is less load put on the motor and bike’s drivetrain.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
    • February 29, 2020 at 11:20 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Jakob,

      I usually program the BBSHD using ‘Karls Special Sauce’ – here is a link to the web page and correct programming parameters. There is also a link to the Bafang open source software.

      These settings provide a much smoother and progressive uptake of power and if you limit your max speed to 35km/h you also save on battery usage. I used to get about a 140 Km range using a 48v 17.5Ah battery.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • January 15, 2020 at 2:17 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for the prompt response. All great advice, thanks.

    I’ve had a look at the stabiliser bar and will see if I can get one fabricated locally, I’m surprised there isn’t a UK seller for these, there seems to be demand for them.

    Cheers, Tim

    Reply
    • January 15, 2020 at 10:10 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Tim,

      You’re welcome. If you have any problems with the installation, give me a shout.

      I actually took a template of the stabiliser bar, but unfortunately misplaced it! You can use the original Bafang mounting plate as a starting point, it should be fairly straightforward to get one made.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • January 15, 2020 at 11:01 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony, great website and advise. I’m looking to buy a BBSHD kit for my Giant Roam 0, it has hydraulic brakes and a Hollowtech II bottom bracket. The existing gear cables route under the bottom bracket.
    I’m looking at a kit linked from your recommended partners with a 44T ring and the C965 display. I have also selected the gear sensor and brake sensors for the hydraulic levers.
    I’m just looking for some reassurance that the kit will fit and if there’s anything else I need to consider.
    Thanks, Tim

    Reply
    • January 15, 2020 at 11:29 am
      Permalink

      Hi Tim,
      I converted a Giant Roam 0 in 2018. It was a straightforward conversion, and I managed to hide the wiring loom under the plastic cover (on the underside of the downtube). The only modification I made for the customer was fitting a Shimano Alfine 8 geared hub (that was the difficult part). But if you are keeping the standard 10-speed 11-36 derailleur gears you will be fine.

      Here is a link to a quick YouTube video I did of the completed bike.

      The only issue the customer had with the bike, was needing to regularly tighten the lockring on the bottom bracket, so we decided to fit a stabiliser bar. Here is a link to the bar on eBay.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • July 19, 2020 at 6:56 am
        Permalink

        Hi, Tony. Is it possible you could elaborate on your experience fitting the Alfine 8? I saw the video, and am in the process of fitting the same setup (but with Grin Phaserunner at 72v).

        I had to scrap plans to use a Gates Carbon belt because the hub is too narrow. I noticed you had to use a chain tensioner. Can you speak on that?

        This is my first build, in conjunction with a local bike shop. Any information you might be able to provide will save me the surprises and disappointments.

        Thanks in advance!

        Justin-

        Reply
        • July 19, 2020 at 11:55 am
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          Hi Justin,

          Are you converting a bike that has derailleur gears fitted at present, or using a bike that already has an Alfine 8 fitted? If the latter is the case, the bike may well have an eccentric BB, which can sometimes prove problematic when installing the BBS motor.

          If you’re fitting the Alfine to a derailleur geared bike, you may need to use spacers when mounting the tensioner to the derailleur hanger, as they don’t always line up very well.

          The gearshift sensor is essential, especially as you are running the build at 72v. I would definitely set the start current on both the PAS and throttle (if you’re using one) at no more than 10% (assuming you can configure the Phaserunner controller in the same way as the standard unit).

          The Alfine 8 seems fairly durable when used with the more powerful Bafang mid-drive motors, but I would advise starting off in a lower power level when riding. Here’s a link to a very informative article on electricbike.com regarding the use of IGH hubs with Bafang mid-drives.

          If you have any more questions, let me know.

          Cheers,
          Tony

          Reply
          • July 20, 2020 at 2:01 am
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            Hi, Tony and Thank you so much for replying so quickly. I am loving the greater “e-bike” community more and more, as everyone seems really cool. I hope to be of similar use to someone else in the future.

            After sending you the message, I realized I would be dodging many of the challenges you faced. I am using a frame that was using a Nuvinci CVT system in the first place: the Nuvinci 171 in fact. It was a great hub, and would have taken in excess of 5kw of power. I decided against it due to the weight, and “drag” during regular pedaling. Tangent complete.

            My frame has a standard English threaded BB & horizontal, track style drop outs with built in chain tensioners; all from the factory. It is a mid-oughties Ellsworth cruiser bike called “The Ride.” It wasn’t particularly popular because it had a $3000 price tag. I paid about 15% of that, and 5% after selling the original wheel set; all savings when back into the bike.

            I’ve seen the article to which you point about 30,000 times x-) !!! It’s part of why I chose the Alfine 8, and specifically the 7001-8.

            I’m running a Phaserunner with Cycle Analyst. I think all my projects will have a Cycle Analyst, or similar computer. I couldn’t possibly see myself without it. All the parameters are adjustable on the fly.

            Have you ever done any maintenance or modifications, including oil baths or adding automatic transmission fluid? I could surmise reducing friction and heat will help.

            Thank you so much for your expedient help! It eased a lot of preemptive stress regarding this project.

            Justin-

          • July 20, 2020 at 7:55 am
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            Hi Justin,

            I’ve never modified the Alfine IGH in any way, and going by long-term customer feedback there haven’t been any major issues or mechanical failure with this unit(so far). I have converted several bikes that use the Nexus 8 (BBS02B 750w), one with the Alfine 11 and a couple with the Alfine 8 and BBSHD (52v battery). I’ve never tried it personally, but I have read on several forums that ATF can help with long-term durability.

            The Cycle Analyst is a great bit of kit and well worth the extra money on the kind of build you’re doing. Let me know how it all goes – there’s always a little bit of trial and error involved, but it sounds like it’s going to be a great project.

            All the best,
            Tony

  • July 12, 2019 at 8:53 am
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    Thanks a million for this great article! The test ride was a bit long-winded and it would have been great if you documented each step thoroughly when mounting the motor (tightening the lock rings, for example), but, all in all, you´re probably the biggest factor in convincing me to buy the BBSHD motor and build my first E-MTB. Is there someplace in England to buy the stabiliser bar? Getting it sent to Austria from the US is unreasonably expensive.

    Thanks again for your thorough in-depth analysis and documentation. Happy trails.

    Reply
    • July 12, 2019 at 10:59 am
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      Hi Stefan,

      Thanks for your comments. I agree the test ride was a bit too long, I should have edited it a bit more. I will do another more detailed installation video in the near future as I did miss out some of the important points.

      I have done some searching and the only places that seem to sell the stabiliser bar are Luna cycles, California ebike and there is a seller on eBay shipping from Australia, but the price is very expensive.

      If you know a decent engineer, it should be fairly straightforward to get one fabricated using the existing mounting plate as a template.

      If you need any more help or advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • July 17, 2019 at 11:21 am
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        Hi, great article. I have the same bafang hd motor w/ DPC18UART.
        Why cant i get level 9 ? It only goes to 5 on pas.
        Hope u can help me.

        Best Regards
        Tor from Norway

        Reply
        • July 17, 2019 at 2:04 pm
          Permalink

          Hi,

          Unfortunately a lot of the DP-C18 displays are preprogrammed for only 5 PAS levels (in the display firmware).

          The displays can be reprogrammed, but this would require specific software.

          Luna cycles sell a version of the display with 9 levels of assist, or you could purchase the P850c colour display.

          Sorry I couldn’t be of more help.

          Regards,
          Tony

          Reply
  • June 23, 2019 at 12:11 am
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    Thank you for the great article. i have B’Twin rockrider 340 (xl) and i will buy BBSHD. I dont know my bottom bracket size. is it 100mm? it maybe the same with the bike you converted.

    Reply
    • June 23, 2019 at 5:01 am
      Permalink

      Hi,

      Glad you enjoyed the article. In answer to your question, the bottom bracket on a Rockrider 340 is 73mm, so a standard Bafang BBSHD will fit (68mm-73mm BB).

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • May 17, 2019 at 2:04 pm
    Permalink

    Hi,

    I have a fat bike with bottom bracket of 12 mm. Do you have a Bafang motor that will fit this bracket?
    If so, what is the cost?

    Reply
    • May 17, 2019 at 2:18 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,

      The Bafang BBSHD is available in 120mm bottom bracket – you can purchase one here from one of my trusted suppliers on Aliexpress. Delivery usually takes approximately 7-15 days depending on your location. Import fees are included for EU / US and Russia.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply

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