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Bafang BBS02 Review – How Reliable is it?

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Introduction

Hello and welcome to my review of the popular Bafang BBS02 mid-drive electric bike conversion kit. This review is based on my own personal experiences installing over seventy of these units over a three year period. I really like the Bafang and it is an excellent motor, but like all things electric there are a multitude of gremlins that rear their head from time to time – this is definitely not a motor to fit and forget!

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The are more useful links at the bottom of this article on where to buy the Bafang BBS02.  from various locales

Overview

The Bafang BBS02 is available in three different configurations: 36v 500w / 48v 500w and 48v 750w.  The 750w version is the most popular as it offers the most bang for your buck!  The motor itself is physically the same as the lower powered BBS01 250w / 350w, the only difference being the internals and controller. The installation criteria is the same as the other Bafang units for the classic 68mm-73mm bottom bracket fitment.

Pressed fit bottom bracket compatibility

As with all the Bafang e-bike kits, there is the potential to install it on a full suspension or hardtail mountain bike that uses a pressfit bottom bracket, although you will need to purchase the correct shim adaptor kit and motor stabiliser bar, or if you know a good engineer, you could get one fabricated. This is not a job to be taken lightly, but it is possible if done correctly. If your bike has an FSA PF30 pressfit bottom bracket then a PF30 to BSA reducer can be easily purchased and fitted.

Legal Information

If you are not familiar with e-bike law, in your country, it is worth checking beforehand. The Bafang BBS02 750w is legal in the US, but not road legal in the UK, EU or Australia, as the power output is rated at between 500w-750w. Peak power is substantially higher – up to 1470w on the 48v 750w model with a 52v battery fitted. If you are in the UK and planning on using this on private land, that is absolutely fine, but if you are going to use it on public roads then you should be aware of the potential legal implications first. Please read this post on UK/EU electric bike law.

This Electric bike kit comes with the following components:

  • The motor unit with integrated controller
  • LCD Display
  • Wiring loom
  • Inner and outer lock-nuts
  • Chainring
  • Plastic Chain-guard
  • Thumb throttle
  • Brake levers with cut-off sensors (only compatible with cable brakes)
  • Speed sensor and wheel magnet
  • A bag of various Allen bolts and screws
Bafang bbs02b 48v 750w mid drive electric bike conversion kit with battery
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Installation

Installation of this motor is the same as other mid drive motors. If you are looking for a nice and easy conversion to do yourself, but you have little or no experience with bicycle mechanics, you should be warned that the installation can be quite challenging! See my guide on how to install a Bafang BBS02.  The installation will need to be carried out by someone who is fairly competent. Removing the bottom bracket on your bike can be a right pain, and you will require a lot of patience!

Technical Data

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This electric motor produces considerably more torque than its smaller siblings (up to 120N.m), I have listed the peak power output for all the motor and battery configurations below:

BafangBatteryPeak Power
BBS02 500w 36v36v (42.2v x 25A)
1055w
BBS02 500w 48v48v (54.4v x 18A)864w
BBS02 500w 48v52v (58.8v x 18A)
1058w
BBS02 750w 48v48v (54.4v x 25A)1200w
BBS02 750w 48v52v (58.8v x 25A)1470w
The voltage figures in brackets are for a fully-charged battery. Note: As the voltage drops, so will the power.

I have listed the power output to include the 52v battery option, as this is quite popular, although I no longer advocate the use of a 52v battery with the BBS02, due to reliability issues (please see below).

Like all the other BBS motors, the BBS02 uses an internal cadence sensor, and gives electric assist based on pedalling rpm. The pedal assist is very responsive, and can be fine-tuned using the 9 power levels available – update: It seems that most of the DP-C18 displays being shipped from China only allow for 5 levels of assist. If you require the full 9 levels go for the P850c display.

bafang dp c18 colour display

The motor kit is supplied with a thumb throttle, but I would  exercise caution when using this. Heat dissipation is not as good on the BBS02 as it is with the BBSHD and even the latest ‘B’ version of the controller (with the upgraded INRFB3077 MOSFETs) can be prone to premature failure when using a throttle inappropriately.

If you need to use the throttle regularly, it would be worth changing the throttle ‘start current’ settings in the controller firmware (you will need a compatible USB lead and software).

It is crucial to be in a low gear on steep hill climbs or starts, as subjecting the motor to unnecessary load can cause the controller to blow.

Personally, I am not a big fan of these throttles. They are not particularly good for modulating the power, and function more like an on/off switch, although reprogramming the controller can make the throttle more user-friendly.

Buy the Bafang BBS02B 750w from Amazon

As with all the other Bafang models, the controller firmware settings can be changed with a USB programming cable and software (which you can download for free here).  If you are doing this for the first time you should exercise caution and do your homework first. A good source of information on Bafang programming can be found on this excellent thread on Endless Sphere.

This kit is available with either a 44t, 46t or 48t steel chainring. If you are climbing lots of steep hills, I would definitely recommend an aftermarket chainring of around 36t .

One thing you will have to be aware of, if you do fit a smaller front chainring, the substantially lower gearing can make the bike prone to power wheelies, especially when hitting full throttle in a low gear on a steep hill start.

If you want to fit the brake levers with cut-off sensors, then bear in mind that these are only suitable for cable operated brakes. I would only recommend installing this kit on a bike with decent hydraulic brakes. Because this motor is so powerful, I would recommend the hydraulic brake cut off sensors or completely new hydraulic brakes with the sensors already built in.

bafang bbs02 750w mid drive motor installed on a full suspension mountain bike

Reliability

I have installed more BBS02 750w motors than any other (in excess of seventy units) and I have had a high rate of controller failure (17%). Whether this is down to the way the bikes are being ridden or the MOSFETs in the controller simply can’t handle the voltage and current, it is hard to say for sure. But there does appear to be a correlation between using 52v batteries and controller failure.

UPDATE: Through 2020 up to the middle of 2021 I haven’t had any reported issues with BBS02B’s I’ve installed.

The 36v and 48v 500w version seems to be the most reliable, to date I have only had one controller failure on this model. If you do experience controller failure (outside of warranty) you can get a replacement here.

Can a 52v battery compromise reliability?

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A 52v battery when fully charged is at 58.8v, this is very close to the motor controller’s maximum operating voltage of 60v. I would personally stick with a 48v battery which is 54.4v fully charged. I have never had any issues with the motors that used 48v batteries. If you would still prefer to fit a 52v battery, then it would be worth buying a spare motor controller.

Having said that, I used a 52v Bafang BBS02 for a year and covered nearly 2000 miles, and I never had any issues – I later sold the bike, and it is still running well to this day!

The motor also uses a nylon primary gear, that can degrade over time. Replacements are easy enough to find, and there are plenty of good tutorials on YouTube for stripping this motor down.

Things to consider

  • For the 500w and 750w 48v models, I would personally stick with a 48v battery, as the power gained by using a 52v battery is minimal, and in my opinion is not worth the risk.
  • You will need a Bafang lock-ring spanner – the BBS02 will sometimes come loose due to the torque of the motor and may need periodic tightening.
  • The speed sensor can be easily knocked out of alignment with the wheel magnet – this will throw up an error code and pedal assist will stop working.
  • Some of the colour displays can be problematic – I find the black and white C965 display to be the most reliable, although the latest DP-C18 colour display seems to be pretty good (although most of these displays only allow for 5 levels of pedal assist).
  • I would definitely recommend fitting a Bafang gearshift sensor, with between 500w – 1470w going to the rear wheel, you will drastically shorten the service life of your rear derailleur, cassette and chain.
  • A heavy-duty chain is definitely recommended – there is a lot of torque going to the back wheel.
  • If you are planning on keeping the bike long term, it may be worth stocking up on some spare parts. It is always useful to have a spare controller and a nylon primary gear.

A demonstration of the gearshift sensor working, on a BBSHD powered bike

Riding a Bafang powered Electric Bike

The BBS02 is guaranteed to put a smile on your face – the days of being intimidated by steep hills are a thing of the past!

All of these motors are quiet and smooth running, I have ridden all three versions, and in my opinion, there isn’t a massive amount of difference between them in the lower power levels, it is only in the higher levels you really notice the extra power of the 750w version.

There is no doubt that in full power mode the 750w version is very quick, and a lot of fun to ride. Power-wise, there really isn’t a lot between the BBS02 and the BBSHD, although the latter has a lot more grunt, and the motor and controller can handle the extra power for a prolonged amount of time, whereas the smaller motor can become unreliable when subjected to constant hard off-road use.

Bafang BBS02 750w with 52 volt battery Installed on a Cube Aim Pro

Conclusion

As long as you are aware of this motor’s limitations, it is a fantastic piece of kit. If you constantly use it in full power mode, and use the throttle a lot, then it will inevitably let you down. I would advise you to purchase a spare controller or otherwise it may be worth spending the extra money and going for a BBSHD.

Install this kit on a decent bike, with good brakes and suspension and you will have a great high performance e-bike that is guaranteed to put a smile on your face!

****Bafang have just released their updated M625 model – click here for more info****

I hope I haven’t put you off with this review, as I really believe this is a great electric bike conversion kit. As long as you can accept the potential long-term maintenance that will inevitably need to be carried out, it is well worth the money.

Buy the Bafang BBS02B 750w from trusted vendors✅

The Bafang BBS02B is available from these websites with shipping to EU countries, UK, US and Canada.
AliExpress.com Product - Bafang 8FUN BBS02B 48V 750W 25A mid drive motor Bicycle Electric Bike EBIKE e-Bike Engine Conversion Kits newest version
Buy from Amazon (multiple countries)
Buy from eBay
👉Compare Bafang BBS02B 750w prices (UK visitors only)

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Thanks for reading and If you have any questions about the Bafang BBS02B, please feel free to leave a comment below or sign up to our new Bafang forum – I check this at least once a day and can usually answer questions within 24hrs.

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Bafang BBS02 mid-drive Electric bike conversion kit

8

Value for Money

9.0/10

Ease of Installation

6.0/10

Efficiency

9.0/10

Pros

  • Performance - The best bang for your buck!
  • Excellent Value for Money
  • Very efficient

Cons

  • Does not handle abuse well
  • Can be difficult to install for the inexperienced
  • Expect to do periodic maintenance

Tony

Passionate E-Bike advocate and enthusiast. 5 years experience converting bikes for customers primarily using Bafang and Tongsheng electric bike motors.

249 thoughts on “Bafang BBS02 Review – How Reliable is it?

  • August 20, 2021 at 6:40 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony,
    Merci pour ce site très instructif .
    J’ai acheté et installé un kit Bafang BBS02 500W 48V.
    Je suis en train de le reprogrammer et me pose la question du courant maximum.
    D’origine , il est à 18 A. Si je fais le calcul, ça me donne 18×48= 864 W
    Est-ce que mon moteur de 500W va supporter cette puissance supplémentaire ?
    Ne va-t-il pas griller ?
    Faudrait-il pas régler le courant limite sur 10.4 pour ne pas dépasser les 500W ?
    Bonne route

    Reply
    • August 20, 2021 at 10:28 pm
      Permalink

      Bonjour,
      Le courant est réglé à 18A en usine. J’ai installé de nombreux kits de moteur 500w 48v BBS02 sans aucun problème. Je trouve que 18A est encore beaucoup de puissance et réduire le courant serait mieux pour le moteur et l’électricité à long terme (si vous n’aviez pas besoin de la puissance supplémentaire). J’espère que ça aide. Sincères amitiés,
      Tony

      Reply
  • July 30, 2021 at 5:24 pm
    Permalink

    The real magic of a BaFang BBSXX mid-drive is that they can be mounted on almost any bicycle. After about 16K miles on my BBS02 it started to make some noise. After looking into them I found it would be hard, if not impossible, to find the necessary rebuild parts because BaFang has made so many changes in the 02 builds from year to year. So I bought a BBSHD and now have over 14K miles on it and riding almost every day.

    Batteries are the heart of every ebike. The BBS series of mid-drives can use 58.8V batteries with no issues. The more voltage, the more watt-hours, the more range/speed/ride time/etc. Don’t charge past 85% or discharge past 20% of the pack’s capacity and you can triple the life of the pack! Triple the number of recharge cycles on the most expensive disposable part. Look into Grin Satiators for almost any battery. One large battery is better than two small batteries… they can be charged faster and they can offer more ride time without stressing the battery. The downside is weight and initial cost. I use and recommend a pair of 58.8V 35Ah 2058Wh lithium packs. Current lithium batteries can be (are) damaged if charged at below-freezing temps which makes them inconvenient for touring in cold weather.

    Mid-drive can also be very harsh on gears and chains. I recommend pairing a BBSHD with a Rohloff Speedhub… they go together like lamb and tuna fish. If you want to put a cherry on top of that get a Gates belt drive and have a better ebike than any production ebike on the market today.

    The Best All-around ebike:
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/ADgC6oyPM2gyrCq27

    Building an eTouring bike – https://motoredbikes.com/threads/building-an-etouring-bike.57007/

    Today’s Ride – https://motoredbikes.com/threads/todays-ride.56564/

    25 Jul 20 – Mowich Lake
    https://www.relive.cc/view/v8qkd2LGdKv
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/hRSTYZ8UjzdpuQ7n8

    26 Jul 20 – Rain Forest trail
    https://www.relive.cc/view/vQvyDGe2W4q
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/WcoVAreB4TUdAiPF7
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwwdaVg4Y5M
    https://prnt.sc/tsxt5p

    Stay safe.

    Reply
    • July 30, 2021 at 9:22 pm
      Permalink

      Thanks for sharing Brian, that’s an awesome build, the Rohloff hub and BBSHD are a match made in heaven! Looks absolutely amazing where you are. If I ever make it over to the States for some touring, the north west is high on my list of places to visit.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • July 28, 2021 at 3:07 am
    Permalink

    do you know if there is a good blog or you tube how to install this in a catrike or ice trike? or can a good bike shop install this? thank you

    Reply
  • June 20, 2021 at 3:26 pm
    Permalink

    Sorry Tony, for my message repeating … I had a trouble to send the message to this web page.
    OK, I can try to have a look at the motor and let you know about the result then.

    Thanks a lot for your hint!

    Regards, George

    Reply
  • June 19, 2021 at 9:08 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    8.5

    Ease of Installation

    6

    Efficiency

    9.5

    Hello Tony,

    I have just installed and my 2nd BBS02 into my wife’s bike. I did it in the same way as the 1st one had been done which was working OK. But an unexpected issue appeared with this 2nd BBS02 – the pedal asist is working in a strange way – as I am using pedals the motor asists for cca 1-2 seconds then breaks for cca 0.5 second and then works for cca 1-2 seconds and breaks for cca 0.5 second and it keeps this performance all the time. If I use the thumb throttle – there is no problem – motor is working OK.
    Is there a possibility to solve the issue by myself?

    Thanks, George

    Reply
    • June 20, 2021 at 10:48 am
      Permalink

      Hi George,

      It sounds like a possible issue with the pedal assist circuit – the sensor is inside the motor and there is a multi-pin plug that connects to the controller. Sometimes this plug is not seated correctly due to too much silicone and the problem can be remedied by simply unplugging, removing the excess silicone and plugging in again. You will need to remove the controller to do this. The other issue could be with the sensor itself – these can be purchased quite cheaply, but you will need soldering skills to swap it out. There are quite a few videos on YT that show how to remove the controller, it’s fairly straightforward and takes about 10 minutes.

      Let me know if you have any more questions.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • August 20, 2021 at 10:02 am
        Permalink

        Value for Money

        8

        Ease of Installation

        6

        Efficiency

        9

        Hi Tony,

        as promised I am back again – I had already checked the plugs of the pedal assist circuit then I have tried to replace the motor to the electronics of my other Bafang BBS02 with the same faulty result. Finally I have replaced the pedal assist sensor with a new one without any progress.
        Please, do you have any idea what could be wrong there at the motor?

        With thanks,
        George

        Reply
        • August 20, 2021 at 11:29 am
          Permalink

          Hi George,

          Just to double check – you’ve tried a different motor controller and replaced the PAS sensor and checked the controller settings using the USB lead and software. It may also be worth trying the other wiring harness and display just to rule those things out. Also if you have brake cut-off sensors fitted I would unplug them just to rule that out as well. I’ve not encountered these persistent problems with the pedal assist before, so there could be something else at fault in the motor itself. Did you manage to get hold of the supplier?

          Regards,
          Tony

          Reply
          • August 21, 2021 at 8:22 am
            Permalink

            Hi Tony,

            thanks for your quick response … to be precise – I had unmounted the faulty motor from its controller – taken off my wife’s bike and swaped it for my bike motor mutually – after this action my bike started working wrong and my wife’s bike running fine. After this swapping I replaced the PAS sensor at the faulty motor but without success. The only thing I did not perform you mentioned above – to check the controller settings using the USB lead and software because I did not have this equipment at my disposal.
            And yes, I have got in touch with the supplier and claimed the defect and they told me it should have been the PAS sensor issue, too /as you mentioned/ and they sent me a new one to replace.
            As the last resort I have ordered the USB cable to check the controller settings and hope to replace it eventually with the flawless one from my good bike.

            With thanks and regards,
            Juraj

          • August 21, 2021 at 8:54 am
            Permalink

            Hi Juraj,

            Thanks for the update, let me know how it goes. It sounds like the fault could be at the controller end, if it is working fine when you swap them over.

            All the best,
            Tony

          • August 22, 2021 at 4:00 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Tony,

            today I have disassembled both of my motors and finally found out the reason – the faulty magnetic disc ring at the big pinion gear. As I mentioned the jerkiness at pedalling started right away as I installed the motor so this was the faulty ring from the factory – maybe a situation that accurs very rarely.

            Good luck a thanks for your support!
            George

          • August 22, 2021 at 4:07 pm
            Permalink

            Hi George,

            Thanks for sharing this with the community. It’s not a problem I’ve come across before but it will certainly be very useful for owners with a similar problem.

            Many thanks,
            Tony

  • June 9, 2021 at 2:40 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    9.5

    Ease of Installation

    7.5

    Efficiency

    8.5

    Great post and totally agree with every thing you have said. I have converted 7 Full suspension specialized bikes (epic pro’s, stunt jumper elites & 3 older FSR frames) wiht the 750w middrive. i have had to use smaller 48V batteries which all still generate 1200w of power. However the point is for trailing /off road use, you simply would not have it on full assist for prolonged periods.
    For this reason none of them have had any reliability issues. My own bike has done 250miles plus with no issues. Road use at full power is a different story and i do know the mosfats are of poor quality. A company local to me send them away to have better ones fitted making them bullet proof.

    The problems i have seen multiple times is in the fitting of the hydraulic sensors. The kits come with 3m tape which you use on the small 10mm magnet and sensor. These i guarantee will fall off. when they do you will lose all power, until you disconnect the lead. I started to super glue them on and now i use a 3mm tap and put a small counter sunk 3mm x 8mm screw through the hole in the magnet PLUS i glue it. NO MORE magnets falling off. Also use 2 part adhesive for the block sensors fitted to your brake levers.

    i have always fitted Ebike NEW chains, but inevitably all 7 bikes have required a NEW cassette. You may find the chain will slip in the lower gears on full assist. if your bike is newer you will likely not need a new cassette.

    The display screens are easy to scratch and in the sun then are not easy to read, so purchase cheap screen covers on amazon to protect it.

    Make sure you buy the bafang tool, i guarantee you the motor will come loose and make a squeaky/rubbing noise when it does. Need to regularly check its tight.

    Reply
  • May 25, 2021 at 10:03 pm
    Permalink

    Tony, your experience with multiple bike conversions is invaluable. I’m a retired electromechanical engineer and want to plunge into converting a reasonably priced mountain bike. The brand and model is a Motobecane Fantom. It has Shimano hydraulic brakes, Front and Rear Lockouts, Full Suspension, and 1×12 gear train and 29″ wheels. http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/full-suspension-mountain-bikes/fantomds-eagle-sx-comp-full-suspension.htm
    I am unable to find any specs on the frame, hub diameter, etc. Have you had any experience with a Motobecane bike? I am considering a 750w 48V 17.5ahr powertrain.

    Reply
    • May 26, 2021 at 7:12 am
      Permalink

      Hi Craig,

      I haven’t converted one of these before and looking at the groupset I would say it has either a Truvativ Powerspline, SRAM GXP or SRAM Dub pressfit bottom bracket. If it has the latter then you would need to machine a shim, but if it has a Powerspline of GXP BB then the motor will fit straight in without any modifications to the BB shell. Here is a link to a good article that goes into greater depth about BB compatibility and the Bafang.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
    • June 9, 2021 at 2:49 pm
      Permalink

      you may struggle to get the battery in the frame. Why not try a smaller 9.6ah which you can get with the smaller height case 90mm, or go to a bag battery which you should get a 14.5ah battery in your frame.

      The range is still impressive, and more importantly with a full suspension bike you need to keep the weight down and low so you can still go trailing.

      You may need spacers in order for the 44t ring to clear the frame on your bike, bling ring do spacers for £5 a time. I would be careful about going bigger than the 44t if they offer a 42T take it.
      Trust me with a 44t and a 11t on the cassette the bike will go 42-43mph still

      shimano brakes levers are one of the easier levers to convert to hydaulic sensors, as they have relatively flat surfaces to mount the sensor & magnet too.

      good luck you will love it

      Reply
  • May 8, 2021 at 8:30 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    10

    Ease of Installation

    10

    Efficiency

    10

    Hello @Tony
    I am researching about Bafang and Tonsheng kits past few weeks, and your article is great resource.
    This is my bike:
    https://www.cube.eu/en/2016/mtb-hardtail/attention/cube-attention-whitenblack-2016/

    From what I read here, Bafang BBS02 can be fitted?
    I would like to use motor ass assistance on steep hills MTB and would like to use my legs more on straight terrain. I would like you to to give me your opinion what motor/battery combination to select, so I do not have to much extra weight but still to maintain certain amount of power and radius.
    Would 36V or 48V be better for this? is 750W too much?

    What reasonable good batterie manufacturers do you recommend? 15Ah, 17Ah? I was looking to this one: https://greencell.global/

    Reply
    • May 9, 2021 at 7:16 am
      Permalink

      Hi Lokz,

      I can confirm the Bafang should be compatible with your Cube MTB, I’ve installed the BBS02 on several Cube MTB’s in the past without any major issues.

      The Bafang motor weighs around 4.2kg and a 48v 15Ah battery will weigh in at around 3.5kg so the extra weight will be around 7.7kg. Personally I think the BBS02 750w will provide way more power than you would normally need – when I owned one for a year I very rarely used it about level 3 (out of 9) but it depends on how steep the hills are.

      I found the 36v 500w version to also be very good, although there isn’t any weight difference. Battery capacity will depend on how far you need assistance. If you’re going for longer rides then a 17Ah would be best. The BBS02 is quite tough to pedal uphill without assist, due to the extra weight and noticeable resistance inside the motor.

      Greencell make decent batteries, I’ve had a few over the last couple of years and they’re still going now.

      If you have any more questions, let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • May 10, 2021 at 7:33 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,
        thank you for taking time to answer. In reality, I would rather use Tongsheng TSDZ2 because of torque sensing, but I am afraid to buy it because one guy told me he had problem fitting that motor because of the rear fork shape. Motor cannot be pushed all way in, so there is a problem with chain line. Do you have any experience with TSDZ2 on Cube Aim, Analog, Attention or Acid?
        Also, bottom cable routing seems problematic.

        People say that TSDZ2 can be ridden without motor assistance much easier than Bafang?

        Other possibility is to install Lingbei motor, seems like certain companies from EU still sell it rebranded (Spain, UK). But I do not know how it showed in practice, is it still in production, will there me spare parts, etc.

        I do not know if any other company exists which makes affordable mid drive engines that I could use to convert my bicycle?

        Maybe solution could be to use rear hub drive motor, I saw new 2021 Tongsheng catalogue where they offer torque sensing rear hubs, but I do not know if that is good solution for mountain biking.

        Reply
        • May 10, 2021 at 8:44 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Lokz,

          I think you will struggle to fit the TSDZ2 on a Cube Aim frame – it’s a great motor, but has a major design flaw in the clearance between the motor shaft and housing. I have installed quite a lot of Tongsheng motors and I always have to re-route the gear cables and remove the plastic guide (under the bottom bracket). Riding the TSDZ2 is noticeably easier without assist than the Bafang, there’s much less resistance from the motor.

          I have yet to test out a Lingbei mid-drive – looking at the design the primary gear looks a lot more robust in design and there are quite few companies in the UK and EU selling it under their own brand names. There’s a detailed thread over on endless-sphere.com about this motor.

          There are a few torque-sensing hub motor kits available but I find small hub motors lacking when it comes to steep off-road climbs. I still reckon a Bafang would be your best bet, if you fit a small front chainring like a 34/36t (Lekkie or PreciAlps) and have an 11-40 rear cassette you’ll be able to climb practically anything. A Shimano Alivio rear derailleur will work with an 11-40 cassette (9-speed) or Shimano Deore M6000 or XT (10-speed).

          I hope this helps.

          Cheers,
          Tony

          Reply
  • May 3, 2021 at 7:16 pm
    Permalink

    Great article, I’ve just bought a kit as i wanted to have a lighter e-bike without any drawbacks or huge costs. I’ve spent a year driving a Raleigh Motus which had a bosh active line mid-drive. It was a pleasant drive for the most part but of late has been giving me some pain in the knees hence the switch.

    My question is how does the Bafang mid-drive differ from the cadence motors you would get in rear hub bikes. I did quite like the fact that in the Bosh as soon as you use the pedal you could feel the motor pushing you along. Ive had some experience with rear hub motors (Lime, Uber jump bikes, and fiido DS2) and they are not as smooth, giving you a bit of a kick start when you turn the crack about 45 degrees.

    Reply
    • May 3, 2021 at 8:11 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,

      The Bafang pedal assist feels quite different to the torque-sensing system on the Bosch – it’s cadence-based so has a very on/off feel to it. Your best bet would be to get a USB programming lead and download the free software and follow this guide on how to alter the pedal assist characteristics.

      With a few minor tweaks to the settings you can make the Bafang very smooth, with a nice and progressive build up of power.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 24, 2021 at 2:50 am
    Permalink

    Hello again!

    I’m back! I had to let you know that today was the actual install of my 48v 750w bbso2 onto the copeland! I saw as you said there was a small weld to hold the wire where the motor would mount after I purchased and put the bike together. I had my angle grinder prepared to dispatch of it but LUCKILY the motor mounted right over it with no issue! The worst part honestly seems to have been waiting for all the CORRECT tools to remove the bottom bracket/crank. No spacers were needed. I installed a speed sensor and brake sensor (magnet) and am wondering how necessary do you think the shift sensor is? Seems to ride really well although the first time I fired it up the throttle stopped responding at all (thought I had blown it up). Turns out the magnet for the brake sensor had fallen off and so the motor wouldn’t engage, lol. Superglued that sucker so now he’s good to go. Will look to purchasing a second battery and doing some clean traveling this summer! Had to say again what a great service you are providing here, and THANK YOU THANK YOU for your quick scholar advice through all the doubts! If I run into any issues I’ll be sure to come and visit haha!

    OH, do you still advise against running a 52v Samsung battery on my setup? I saw originally you said something about it and also to adjust some voltage in the device to prevent damage to the controller? Do you still suggest I do that?

    Reply
    • April 24, 2021 at 9:15 am
      Permalink

      Hi Ryan,

      The shift sensor isn’t really necessary if you get used to stopping pedalling briefly when shifting (under load / high power). Regarding the battery, I ran a BBS02 with 52v battery for nearly a year and never had any problems. I reduced the max current to 18A (using the USB and software) and lowered the start current on pedal assist from 20 to 10, I didn’t have a throttle fitted, but if you do I would reduce the start current on the throttle down to 10 as well.

      I hope this helps, happy riding!

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 19, 2021 at 1:04 pm
    Permalink

    Brilliant website and so much valuable information here.
    I recently bought a Bafang 750w 48v kit and are part way through installing it. I tried to find out which version I have but like so many other people, got nowhere. Anywhere I can find out??

    Reply
    • April 19, 2021 at 6:10 pm
      Permalink

      Hi David,

      There’s two main versions – the A and B model. The A model was phased out years ago so any Bafang sold since 2017 should be the B model. Here is a link to an article that explains the difference in more detail. All of the BBS02 705w motors I’ve installed over the last couple of years have the separate gear sensor lead coming from the controller.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 16, 2021 at 7:42 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Roman,

    I have previously replied to this comment, it should be below.

    All the best,
    Tony

    Reply
  • April 12, 2021 at 4:38 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony.
    It was interesting to read your article about Bafang BBS02. Thanks for sharing your experience with us.
    Maybe your experience can help me.
    I’m looking for Bafang BBS02 motor and have some problem in choosing each one to buy: 500W 36V or 750W 48V.
    Now I have Aikema 128SX BBA B2 500W 36V 60 NM torque rear hub motor in our bicycle. It drives really fast with the help of pedals, up to 50 km/h. But that’s only on a flat. When I go uphill, it is not so well. Even the controller becomes too much hot and the power wires from the controller to the moto began to melt. Also it’s not easy to help it climbing uphill by pedaling.
    But I live high uphill and have to overcome 1,5 km of ascent 15-30% incline everyday. So I decided to buy mid drive motor.
    I already have 36V 21Ah battery. That’s why I look to 36V 500W Bafang BBS02.
    BUT: is there any technical differences between 48V 750W and 36V 500W Bafang BBS02 motors?
    Maybe like this:
    – reduction ratio is different (350W …. , 500W … , 750W … )
    – magnets are bigger
    – motor winding (number of turns)
    – maybe gears in 750W motor are more strong than in 350W
    – some other differences.

    Or all the difference is only in controller settings?

    If 48V 750W motor is technically the same as 36-500, then I choose the last one. And if it’s really technically better, maybe I spend money for 48V battery and buy 48V 750W Bafang BBS02.

    Please help me to understand it and make a decision.

    Roman.

    Reply
    • April 12, 2021 at 6:33 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Roman,

      The BBS02B motor has different windings to the BBS01B – you can interchange controllers with 36v 500w for a 48v 750w if required. Having said that, the 36v 500w motor puts out 900w of peak power (36v x 25A). I have tested the 500w on a climb near me over 1.6km with average gradient of 10% (with 15-20% sections) and it handled it very well. It would be worth investing in a much smaller chainring, by either buying a Lekkie Bling ring or PreciAlps chainring – I would say about 36t on the front would be good with an 11-36 or 11-40 rear cassette. The lower gearing the better as this will help the motor to spin faster and remain cooler on the long climbs.

      I hope this helps, let me know if you have any further questions.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 6, 2021 at 6:56 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony, Love all the informative treasure here ! Thanks for taking your time to explain everything to novices like me! I have a 750w 48v BBS02B Ordered and am really stumped about finding information for the bottom bracket about bikes. I was elated to find someone who seems to have experience with adding this motor to SO MANY bikes! I’m currently looking at Schwinn models like the AXUM Sidewinder or Copeland 700c hybrid or even a Trinx brand m500? Any idea which Schwinn models use the 68-733mm bracket? and would something like a mongoose excursion with 24″ be too small for this? Or perhaps a eurobike fashion? I can’t seem to find any info on the sites about a bottom bracket length 🙁 I’ve even emailed most companies and they seem either swamped or the representative doesn’t understand and just sends me a link to the same info lol. I would just really hate to spend all this time ordering a bike that doesn’t fit as I’ve read shimano has adopted changes to threading on them recently. Thanks for your time man!

    Reply
    • April 6, 2021 at 7:24 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Ryan,

      I’ve just checked out the links you sent me in the previous message – all the bikes should have a regular BSA threaded bottom bracket. I reckon any of the Schwinn hybrids will be just right for a first time conversion. Hybrids are generally more straightforward to convert than MTB’s. I did convert an older Schwinn hybrid a couple of years back and it was a nice and easy job. The only tricky part is removing the bottom bracket, always remember to unscrew towards the front of the bike (on both sides) – you’ll need the right Shimano BB tool and preferably a long breaker bar for some leverage.

      I hope this helps, if you have any more questions, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • April 6, 2021 at 7:46 pm
        Permalink

        Wow! You are fast to respond! What a lifesaver, just hearing this gives me a lot of ease, lol. Sorry to repost in a different manner. I felt maybe posting all the links wasn’t kosher, but figured that would be a safe way to ensure you knew exactly which bike I was talking about. Ended up looking like a salesman post ahah. Another awesome tip I didn’t know – to unscrew towards front on BOTH sides. I have the tool ordered and everything else I could imagine needing so hopefully it goes well. The only other thing im not 100% about is adding a “high torque” chain. With master links i think they are called are those universal? Will i need a specific chain for the bike i purchase or are they pretty much universal and I just resize with a chain breaker and universal master link? Can you just completely remove the back derailleur? What exactly makes a hybrid easier to install mid drive than MTB? Much appreciated, again!

        Reply
        • April 6, 2021 at 10:47 pm
          Permalink

          I usually use a Shimano, SRAM or KMC chain. You can get e-bike specific chains like the KMC X9E, they’re meant to be more durable but cost double the price of a regular chain. As long as you use a decent quality one you should be fine. I would keep the derailleur gears especially if you’ve got hills to climb, the Bafang transfers power through the drivetrain and having lower gearing for getting up the hills will help the motor spin faster and keep it cooler and more efficient. The bottom brackets is usually 68mm on modern hybrids and 73mm on MTB’s (apart from older ones) – with the 73mm MTB BB’s you need longer Allen bolts and spacers for the motor mounting plate. If the MTB has a boost rear hub, then the angle on the chainstays can prevent the motor from fitting flush in the BB shell.

          Reply
          • April 7, 2021 at 1:52 am
            Permalink

            Alrighty, keep it it is! Good to know a chain wont be specific, I wanted to have a new one right off the bat. I’m finally thinking of pulling the trigger on a Schwinn Sidewinder MTB. It has a steel frame like you suggested and disk brakes which were a must because they seemed smart for a powered bike. Any idea if that one has the boost rear hub issue? How would you resolve the issue if the chainstays prevented it from fitting, if at all? I’ll go ahead and get some spacers ordered if need be.

          • April 7, 2021 at 6:33 am
            Permalink

            Hi Ryan,

            You’ll be fine with the Schwinn, it’s got a regular 135mm quick release hub. Boost hubs are usually only found on modern MTB’s with thru-axles.

          • April 7, 2021 at 6:59 am
            Permalink

            Perfect! I just went with a Schwinn 700c Copeland Men’s Hybrid Bike. I liked the idea of the steel frame. Also the 700c tires since I’ll be on the road a lot with it. Let’s hope all goes well and I’ll keep you posted and bother you if I have anymore worries, haha. But honestly you’re awesome and thanks again for taking so much doubt away!

          • April 7, 2021 at 8:35 am
            Permalink

            You’re welcome, glad to help. Hope the build goes smoothly👍

    • April 6, 2021 at 7:37 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Again,

      Sorry I forgot to mention, it’s probably worth giving the Eurobike a wide berth – I would have a look around locally and see if they’re any old steel frame MTB’s or hybrids available. Sometimes it’s much better to buy a good quality vintage bike than a cheap new one. Nearly all 90’s mountain bikes and hybrids have a regular bottom bracket plus they’re made of steel which is a good, tough frame material👍

      Reply
      • April 6, 2021 at 8:22 pm
        Permalink

        Good thinking. Eurobike seemed cheaper but I really like the looks. Steel is def my first choice, but it seems hard to find atm in my price range (trying to stay under 700)and the carbon fiber are pretty pricey. I might need to up this range? I’ve just dished out more than planned on motor and all the accessories. Apparently this pandemic has made a LOT of bikes unavailable, lol. I’m really not picky I just want something that I can maintain and will hopefully last. If you have any suggestions for under 700 that I could possibly obtain during this pandemic that’d be stelllar because as I say not really picky. Will probably end up repainting it anyways. I figure at worst I can always replace the bike and still use the motor if it’s too rough on an alum? Lots to consider, so cool to have helpful good folk like you!

        Reply
        • April 6, 2021 at 10:51 pm
          Permalink

          I just had a quick look on Amazon and found a Schwinn GTX – it has the gear cables routed along the top tube (as opposed to downtube) this would make the installation more straightforward as when cables are routed underneath the BB the motor can pinch them. Here is a link.

          There’s sometimes some good deals on eBay, there’s quite a few sellers who sell old bikes and will ship them anywhere within the country.

          Let me know how it goes, and if you need any more advice on suitable bikes let me know.

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
          • April 7, 2021 at 1:58 am
            Permalink

            Oh just saw this! How much more of a chore will having gear cables down the tubing be? Or is it just a risk of them being pinched and nothing really to be done? I actually looked at that GTX but thought maybe a steel frame would be better in the sidewinder but if you think that’s a good match… Good news is the sidewinder seems to have cables up top. And just wanna say you really go above and beyond to help out!

          • April 7, 2021 at 6:35 am
            Permalink

            In my experience it can vary from bike to bike, sometimes you need to modify or replace the plastic cable guide under the bottom bracket, on some bikes there’s enough clearance.

          • April 7, 2021 at 2:03 am
            Permalink

            Sorry to spam, forgot to ask about the 24″ wheels on the sidewinder. Think that will matter?

          • April 7, 2021 at 6:36 am
            Permalink

            So problem with 24″ wheels although it seems an unusual size for an adult bike – usually they’re 26″, 27.5″ or 28″.

          • April 7, 2021 at 2:29 am
            Permalink

            Well, I’ve decided to go either sidewinder or the Schwinn 700c Copeland Men’s Hybrid Bike. That one has v brakes in the rear but cables don the bottom tube. Says steel frame and hybrid might be better since I’ll be commuting with it on paved roads a lot? Which one would you choose of the two? I’ll wait ’til I get your expertise before pushing the button, lol.

          • April 7, 2021 at 6:40 am
            Permalink

            I reckon the Sidewinder will be your best bet, cables routed along the top and it looks a bit more durable plus you can always upgrade the brakes to hydraulic in future.

            Let me know how the build goes.

            Cheers,
            Tony

        • August 3, 2021 at 6:24 pm
          Permalink

          Value for Money

          10

          Ease of Installation

          10

          Efficiency

          10

          I’m using my 1994 DiamondBack Topanga MTB. I bought new then(£350) and it has a very decent speck (Alivio 21 speed set up) with a chromoly frame.
          In 2014 I restored it to the tune of £300 with a full bare metal respray in Triumph ‘Roulett green’. It hasn’t seen much use due to my state of fitness but this is now to change.
          The centre pull brakes are the only downside but I will put the best brake material in and see how it works.
          I am using the BBS02 48v set up so will expect a nice surprise!!!

          Reply
  • March 18, 2021 at 9:32 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony from Greece

    Congrats for your detailed information on your site!
    I live in a hilly area and I have to climb every day a hill with a height of 50 meters (164ft) in just 850 meters (2788ft) distance

    Do you think that the BBS02B 750w 48V 17.5 A in a mountain bike would be enough to go to my work every day? The total distance to my work is about 3000 meters (9800 ft), but at the end of the road there is this steep hill.

    Of course I will reprogram the controller to limit the max current to 20A and I’ll lower the start up current as you suggest

    Thanks for your time
    Andreas

    Reply
  • March 9, 2021 at 1:32 am
    Permalink

    Rather Step Through Trek Allant (2009 model)

    Hi Tony, thank you for helping everyone out. I have a question for you.

    1) I want to install a
    48V 750W Bafang BBS02B Mid Drive Motor Electric Bicycle Ebike Conversion Kits 68-73mm that I bought from Aliexpress

    2) I also bought the
    Gear Shift Sensor E-bike Parts For Bafang Mid Drive Motor BBS01 BBS02 BBSHD Electric Bicycle Conversion Accessories 3 Pin Male (per the seller’s recommendation)

    3) I will be installing on a step through Trek Allant (2009)

    4) I have a 48 Volt battery (5 pin)

    Is the kit ok for my goals?

    And to you recommend I get a smaller tooth kit than I got, the smallest the seller had was 44. If so, can you send me a proper link to smaller tooth cog in front?

    Thank you so very much,

    Josh

    Reply
    • March 9, 2021 at 12:32 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Josh,

      The Bafang should be a straightforward conversion on your Trek – it has a standard 68mm threaded BB so it should be a good fit. You’ll need a crank puller and a bottom bracket removal tool (for a JIS square tapered BB). You can buy a Lekkie Bling ring from California-ebike.com – they have lots of different sizes in stock, the 42t is probably best all-rounder and it improves the chain-line a little.

      If you need any more advice, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • March 7, 2021 at 4:36 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony, I decided to go as you suggest for the BBS2B 500W. I understand correctly that depending my battery I should choose 36 or 48V ? I suppose I try to power a 48V controller with my existing 36V battery it will not work. Am I right ? In case I want to upgrade in future when my battery will be over I can just change the controller and buying a new more powerful battery, correct?
    Last today could you send me an affiliate link to buy from amazon.it I will buy the kit there due delivery issues. Thanks Andrea

    Reply
    • March 7, 2021 at 7:14 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Andrea,

      A 36v battery will only work with a 36v controller as they’re not dual voltage on the Bafang. If you decide to upgrade in future a 48v controller is a straight swap and takes about 10-15 minutes. Here is a link to Amazon Germany – I’m fairly sure they ship to all countries within the EU.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • February 13, 2021 at 7:52 pm
    Permalink

    hi tony will bbs02 fit the boardman 700c hybrid frame thanks in advance

    Reply
    • February 13, 2021 at 9:25 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Allan,

      Yes it should do. I’ve converted a couple of Boardman hybrids in the past and they’re usually very straightforward. I’m fairly sure even the later models have BSA threaded bottom brackets.

      If you have any more questions, let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
    • March 3, 2021 at 7:29 pm
      Permalink

      Value for Money

      8.5

      Ease of Installation

      5.5

      Efficiency

      0

      Your review here is very intersting.
      I have justcompleted installing a Bafang BS01B 250W 36v kit in my little -used Carrera Vulan MTB. It’s my first attempt at an electric bike conversion kit. I researched installtion online and , at 75 years old , the instalation has taken me nearly 3 weeks, with mistakes and corection along the way.
      I opted to fit a 36t chainring from China which produced an excessive chain-line resulting in chain pullin away from the chainwheel in low gear.
      I’m not sure whether a Bling Ring 36 t would cure this or would the chainline still be excessive. I live in a hilly area and I’m wondering if the 8-speed setup and standard 44T up front would overload the motor on 22% gradients?
      My bottom bracket is a standard 68mm but I found a 4mm gap when the mounting plate was fitted to the motor requiring the suppiler to send me shims to remedy this and longer bolts.
      I’ve read a 36t Bling Ring would require 50Nm and I do have a suitable torque wrench – but can you confirm this torque setting.
      BTW I’ve been riding my Voodoo Bizango Electric for 30 months and love it!
      Thanking you and please keep up your intersting reviews.

      Reply
      • March 3, 2021 at 10:31 pm
        Permalink

        Hi,

        The Lekkie Bling ring is dished inwards a little to compensate for the offset, I’ve used a 36t Lekkie in combination with a 9-speed 12-36 cassette before with no compromise in shifting quality. Another alternative would be to purchase an 8-speed 11-40 cassette, these will work with a Shimano Alivio or Deore rear derailleur as long as you adjust the ‘b’ screw a couple of turns and fit a longer chain.

        Regarding the torque settings, 50Nm seems quite high, I’ve always tightened them to 20 ft-lb (27Nm). The 4mm gap is quite common on MTB’s that have a 73mm bottom bracket.

        It’s definitely better to have the lower gearing, I have a 25% climb near me and having the lower bail-out gear gets me up there without any fuss.

        I hope this helps, if you have any further questions, please let me know.

        Cheers,
        Tony

        Reply
        • March 4, 2021 at 6:32 pm
          Permalink

          Value for Money

          8

          Ease of Installation

          8

          Efficiency

          8

          Hi Tony, first great website! Thank for publishing all that info and content a truly professional job! Well done ! I carefully read most of the info but still have some doubt about buying a BBS02 Bafang Kit. I’ll try being simple which I am not usually. I already convert years ago (about 2010) my old Trek Calypso cruiser with a front motor, basically because that time that was the only easy available. Its a 36 volt and I also bought a LiFePO battery 36v15Ah from Ping Battery in china. Both motor and battery works fine till now, now its time to renew all that. My will would be to start upgrading the motor moving to the BBS02 500W 36V. I carefully consider the opt of buying the most power and probably reliable 750W 48V but that would mean changing the battery too and frankly I prefer to get EOF actual battery before moving some else. I live in an area where hills are common (Switzerland) and I will appreciate the new engine will help me a little bit more the old front one (probably an Amazon/9Continent) . I understand that during riding hill the controller may blow if under stress. I found also possible to configure the controller reducing the max ampere from 25 to 18/20 to contain heat dissipation under stress… Doing that on a 500W36V will permit me climb hills decently or I’ll suffer a bit and speed will be drastically reduced?? What do you suggest to do ? Consider because my location to move straight to 750W 48V stuff and planning to double the initial spending from beginning ? My will is to carefully spend money but we also say who less spend more spend, that’s mean that if I had to plan a more serious upgrade I’ll do but a reason should exist.. I have no will to ride more that 20 Mph even on normal road, my cruiser doesn’t fit faster but I expect to ride hills about 15 Mph at least… Please give me a suggestion . Thanks in advance Andrea 🙂

          Reply
          • March 5, 2021 at 12:00 am
            Permalink

            Hi Andrea,

            Thank you for your positive comments, much appreciated.

            In answer to your question, I personally prefer the 500w BBS02B, in my experience it’s more reliable than the 48v 750w version and there’s not a massive difference in performance. I would recommend limiting the current to 20-22A as the motor still offers very strong performance in this range. I live in a very hilly part of the UK (Cornwall) and the 500w copes very well with steep climbs – I would recommend low gearing to help maximise the motor efficiency. If you can fit a smaller front chainring (like a Lekkie Bling Ring) I would go for a 36t with an 11-36 rear cassette if possible.

            I hope this helps, if you have any more questions, please let me know.

            All the best,
            Tony

  • February 5, 2021 at 5:52 am
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    9

    Ease of Installation

    7

    Efficiency

    7

    Hi,
    you mentioned a few times in your answers that there’s not enough thread left to tighten the outer lock ring on a 73 BB. Is it save to use only the inner lock ring or do you know any other solution for this problem?
    Thank you and kind regards
    Paul

    Reply
    • February 5, 2021 at 12:55 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Paul,

      It depends on the angle of the chainstays. On some 73mm BB’s you can still fit the outer lockring, but on later boost rear hub MTB’s you may need a couple of bottom bracket spacers on the drive side of the motor. Last year I installed a BBS02 on a new Boardman MTB and only used the inner lockring and this hasn’t caused any issues.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
    • February 2, 2021 at 6:08 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Fabio,

      Personally, I would pay the extra and buy a 100mm BB BBSHD, although there are adaptors available for the BBS02 – Here is a link to one from Fasterbikes EU which are in Germany. I hope this helps.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • January 16, 2021 at 2:03 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    10

    Ease of Installation

    10

    Efficiency

    10

    Hi all, just wanted to tell you that I’ve been running a BBS02 750 watt on a Surly Krampus with front suspension (Rockshox Pike RCT3), ebike hydraulic disks, 36 tooth Lekkie Bling Ring and 52v battery for a few years. No problems, no failures and miles of pain free riding, this bike uses a Shimano Alfine internal gear hub. I don’t thrash it and my reason for the 750 watt was durability due to the larger coil and heat dissipation at lower power outputs. I reckon I very rarely ride it at more than 250 – 350 watts. My no longer used 250 watt and 350 watt models overheat on long rides as I’m using them closer to their max output for longer. My 500 watt one also gets quite warm when I use that at higher outputs. I also have a BBSHD on a Surly Pugsley Fat Bike. Again, 36 tooth Lekkie Bling Ring, ebike hydraulic disks, 52v battery and this time a Rohloff internal gear hub (love of my life). This also wasn’t intended to be thrashed and with sensible riding I can happily get between 60 – 100 miles out of a battery charge (52v 26amp) and its great for towing a laden Burley Coho trailer (although the extra weight of towing reduces range). Re the battery, I took a gamble on Amazon with an unbranded one with no reviews and at a high cost but it has done me proud and is fine about 4 + years on. I also use Lekkie geometry corrected cranks as the stock ones mean your feet are different distances from the centre of the bottom bracket. For anyone in the UK, Darren at Brighton ebikes has sorted me out on many an occasion with Lekkie parts. I’m a happy camper (or I would be if we were allowed out of our houses at the moment). Stay safe everyone!

    Reply
  • December 27, 2020 at 5:10 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    10

    Ease of Installation

    4.5

    Efficiency

    10

    Hi Tony,

    Thank you for your good job. Your website is very usefull for me.

    I’m new on electricbikes. I mount my first bafang kit 2 weeks ago (BBS02 750W 48V). I fried the controller after 3 days. I don’t know why.

    Could you give me advises to save the next controller?

    I’d add that I live in mountain. I don’t go offroad, but I can ride a rise on a road during one hour. Is it a problem to use the assistance in level 9 for one hour (I don’t use the throttle, I pedal)?

    Sorry for my english (I’m french).

    Bests regards

    David

    Reply
    • December 27, 2020 at 6:26 pm
      Permalink

      Hi David,

      Bafang controllers can be temperamental. It’s sometimes luck of the draw whether you get a good or bad one.

      I would say that if you are climbing very long hills in full power mode, it may be worth altering the controller settings using the available USB lead and software. I have found by reducing peak current to 18A (from 25A), I haven’t had a single failure reported by customers in the last year.

      Also, it would be worth making sure your pedalling cadence is in the 70-90rpm range. The motor will spin faster and run cooler, reducing the risk of controller failure. The BBS02 doesn’t disperse heat as well as the BBSHD so you may need to have the occasional rest on very long climbs.

      If you want to monitor your pedalling speed you can buy a fairly cheap bike computer with cadence sensor for around 100 Euro.

      Let me know if you have any more questions.

      Kind regards,
      Tony

      Reply
      • May 20, 2021 at 3:49 am
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,
        I have a BBS02 that bought in 2015. I had trouble w/ the controller back then and they sent me another. Shortly after, my display wouldn’t work, but I suspected it was my battery cause I had just changed my controller. I tried troubleshooting it w/ the Bafang technician, but it got too involved w/ checking the BMS, etc. I lost interest. Anyhow, I’ve regained my interest and bought a new Luna 52v battery. I tested out my bike and the display still doesn’t come on. I checked the battery voltage and it was correct. The question I have is, do you think I need to replace my controller? And with my 2015 BBS02 motor, which should I get? Some controllers say, not compatible w/ 2015 or earlier motors. Also, I was wondering, if I were to replace my motor w/ BBS02B, would it be possible to keep the original C965 display and sensors on my bike?
        Thanks,
        Rey

        Reply
        • May 20, 2021 at 10:52 am
          Permalink

          Hi Rey,

          Your problem may be with the display or wiring harness from display to controller. I’ve had similar problems in the past and have sorted them just by fitting a new harness or display. It’s worth checking these things first before buying a new controller. If you do replace the controller you’ll need to make sure it’s for a BBS02 ‘A’ model. If you decide to replace the motor with a ‘B’ model, your existing display and speed sensor should work fine.

          Regards,
          Tony

          Reply
    • January 16, 2021 at 2:06 pm
      Permalink

      Hi David, I’ve just posted comments which are awaiting moderation. Hopefully they will be useful for you. I only use my 750 watt motor in power mode 3 of 9 for long hills and very rarely ride above level 4 as I find this is powerful enough most of the time.

      Reply
      • January 16, 2021 at 2:25 pm
        Permalink

        Hi John,

        Thanks for sharing, much appreciated.

        All the best,
        Tony

        Reply
        • January 16, 2021 at 3:08 pm
          Permalink

          Value for Money

          10

          Ease of Installation

          10

          Efficiency

          10

          One more thing, I started using 500C displays which I got on Amazon. They’re super small and ultra programmable from the display itself and work with BBS01 through to BBSHD and can be easily programmed with wheel sizes, speed limits, battery voltage, assist levels 3, 6 or 9, poles before start (how quickly the motor engages) etc etc. Think the programming access code is 1919 or 9191 (either/or). The display is tiny but easily readable!!! Can be placed right next to the brake clamp on a 22mm bar on the left and can be operated with a thumb. Also has haptics so it vibrates to let you know that the power output has adjusted when you press the buttons. Don’t know if one is made with buttons on opposite side for right hand side though. So in summary, great “TINY” display which frees up handlebar real estate and doesn’t interfere with handlebar bag brackets, light mounts, Garmin Edge mounts etc. Good luck everyone.

          Reply
  • December 24, 2020 at 10:12 am
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    7.5

    Ease of Installation

    4

    Efficiency

    10

    Hi,

    I have a BBS02 kit 48V 750W.

    I’d like to know if the controlers BBS are all compatibles with this kit. If yes, do I have to make a specific setting?

    Can I use a 36V 12,8ah battery with this kit?

    Thanks

    David

    Reply
    • December 24, 2020 at 9:16 pm
      Permalink

      Hi David,

      If you fit a BBS02 36v 500w controller, you will be able to use the battery. The controller will need to correspond to the model of your motor – ‘A’ model (earlier model – very rare nowadays) or ‘B’ model (much common and recent).

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • December 20, 2020 at 12:45 am
    Permalink

    I have a Merida Speeder 400 and am considering fitting a Bafang BB 250W or W750 to it. The bike does not have suspension, weighs 9.5kg and has carbon front fork. So with the Bafang fitted it would still be relatively light. Do you think this kind of road bike is OK for a Bafang conversion or would it be better to instead get hold of a bike with suspension and not so light.

    Reply
    • December 20, 2020 at 9:15 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Michael,

      The Merida should be an ideal donor bike. The bike that got me back into cycling was a Ridgeback Flight, that had an alloy frame with carbon fork and 700×35 tyres. As long as your Merida has a threaded bottom bracket, the Bafang BBS motor will be a good fit.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
    • January 23, 2021 at 4:40 pm
      Permalink

      Ho everyone,

      could you please help me with my bike electra cruiser lux fat tire 7D? I would like to make it electric. Most of the time (about 80%) would be used on a road. Thank you for any advice.

      Reply
  • November 26, 2020 at 5:16 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony I own a Specialized hybrid cycle and I fitted a BBS01 36V kit some 4 years ago. The first fault occurred with the controller and I needed to replace it with a supposedly modified one. It has the earlier casting which isnt too waterproof so I made sure it was well sealed around the joints. The controller lasted for about 9 months and has failed a again. Is the BBS02 36V 500W motor more reliable?
    I dont abuse the motor and well aware of how one could overload it through wrong gearing etc.

    Kind regards

    John

    Reply
    • November 26, 2020 at 8:37 pm
      Permalink

      Hi John,

      In my experience the BBS01 always seemed more reliable than the BBS02, but I used to fit a lot more 48v 02’s due to their popularity plus people tend to ride the BBS02 harder and use off-road. In the last couple of years I haven’t had one recorded failure of the 02, but have had two failures with the 01. Out of all the configurations I’ve fitted the BBS02 5002 36v does seem to be the most reliable. I find altering the controller settings using the USB lead and software seems to improve reliability. The main setting to change is the pedal assist ‘start current’. It’s set at 20% out of the box and always reduce this to 10% which means less load on the motor when pedalling starts. Also the maximum current is set to 25A on the 36v 500w, I always drop this a little to 20-22A which gives a bit of a buffer zone.

      I hope this info helps, if you have any more questions, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 30, 2020 at 12:26 pm
    Permalink

    Tony
    I have Day6 Dream 24 bike which I now want to install an electric kit. I am puzzled a bit on the chainwheel , it is 42 tooth and Day6 say to buy a kit with a 42 tooth, however as I look at most of the kits on Amazon very few have 42 tooth chain wheels. I was going to buy 48V 750W 14aH unit. Can I just buy 42 tooth independently ? I am a bit confused by all the chainwheels which Bafang specify.
    Donie

    Reply
    • October 30, 2020 at 1:34 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Donie,

      There’s several options. The smallest chainring you can get with a kit is usually 44t, there are some suppliers on Aliexpress who will supply an Alloy Bafang 42t chainring if required. The other option is to buy a 104BCD chainring adaptor – this will enable you to fit a regular 104BCD chainring. The more expensive option is to buy a Lekkie Bling Ring, but these are over 80 Euro, so a bit pricey (but they are very well made).

      I hope this helps.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
    • November 2, 2020 at 5:54 pm
      Permalink

      Value for Money

      10

      Ease of Installation

      10

      Efficiency

      10

      The 46t or 48t front chainring will put good speed on the bike 30mph plus

      Reply
  • September 27, 2020 at 11:34 am
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    10

    Ease of Installation

    10

    Efficiency

    10

    Hello. Thank You for this very useful articicle. I plan to buy Bafang BBS02 with 750W and keep thinking if it will fit my bicycle bottom bracket, because it is “23mm” spindle on paper. But it looks like it is “inner” hole, which rotates along the pedals, not just hole in the frame hmm.

    “Specialized 2015 Rockhopper expert evo 650b” https://www.specialized.com/co/en/rockhopper-expert-evo-650b/p/65475?color=&searchText=91215-2201

    I don’t have any experience with converting bicycle to e-bike, and wondering could the Bafang fit or not hmm. If I need only some kind of adaptor it is good, but would be not so fun if it would not fit at all hmm. I would really appreciate Your answer and your experience with Bafang motors.

    Thank You in advance, Dainius.
    Lithuania.

    Reply
    • September 27, 2020 at 4:29 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Dainius,

      I have just checked out the specification of your bike on the Specialized website, and it uses a Samox BSA 73mm bottom bracket, so the Bafang BBS02B should be a perfect fit. I have converted a similar aged Rockhopper in the past and it was fairly straightforward. You will need a special tool to remove the bottom bracket.

      I hope this helps, if you have any more questions, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • September 18, 2020 at 10:50 am
    Permalink

    You seem to be the Mr Miyagi of the E-bike world. If you could please help me with a build I am considering I would be most great full.

    I have a 2017 Voodoo Bizango with a 10 speed 11-36T and cranks 22/36T. I was looking at the Bafang BBS02b 750w and 48v battery. I will be using for general green lanes, road and occasion trail riding, not to bothered about the throttle control.

    What kit would you recommend and what size chain ring would i need?
    Do all the BBs02b come with the wire for the gear sensor?
    Hardest is finding a decent seller with the correct parts etc.

    Thanks in advance for your help.
    Wayne

    Reply
    • September 18, 2020 at 6:27 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Wayne,

      I’ve converted a few 2017 Voodoo Bizango’s (yellow ones) and generally they are very straightforward to convert. I usually source my motor kits for Bestebike on Aliexpress, as they usually have stock in Europe – the last kit I ordered turned up in less than a week. Here is a link to the product page. The best configuration for a decent battery range would be the 48v 17Ah with the DP-C18 colour display.

      Regarding chainring, they usually supply either a 46t or 44t – I would personally go with a Lekkie Bling ring (from Brighton e-bikes), they’re quite pricey, but they look neat and have a narrow-wide profile to minimise the chain coming off. I also find they help improve the chain-line.

      All the BBS02B’s I’ve had from Bestebike have the plug coming off the motor for the gearshift sensor. I usually buy these from a UK supplier on eBay. You can buy the gear sensor off Aliexpress for less money, but it usually means waiting for delivery from China.

      One more thing worth buying is an e-bike specific chain. On the last Bizango I converted, I used a KMC X10e.

      The Bizango uses a Shimano Deore M610 rear derailluer, you will need to re-adjust the indexing once you’ve installed the motor.

      I hope this helps, if you need any more info, give me a shout.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • September 18, 2020 at 7:01 pm
        Permalink

        Hi, thanks that is a great help and yes I have the yellow Bizango.

        Would you recommend a 36t chainring the which I guess is the same as the largest one already fitted?

        On the ebay listing for the gear sensor which option out of the 3 would I need? Guess I need to watch a video on the installation process.

        The only other thing I would need is tools to remove the old crank arms and bottom bracket.

        Again thanks.

        Reply
        • September 18, 2020 at 8:36 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Wayne,

          You’ll need to select option 3 the ‘shift sensor’ on its own. They’re fairly straightforward to fit – you shift to the highest gear (smallest cog on the cassette) release the gear cable from the derailleur, and thread the cable through the hole in the sensor. If the end of the gear cable is frayed, you might need to buy another gear cable or if you have enough spare cable, use some cutters to trim the end of the cable.

          You will need a bottom bracket removal socket (1/2″) and a crank extractor. The Bizango has a Shimano Octalink bottom bracket, so you will need a specific crank puller >Here is the link.

          Another thing you will need (if you don’t already have one) is a 1/2″ breaker bar – this will give you enough leverage to remove the bottom bracket, as they can be a right sod to remove at times.

          For installation of the motor a Bafang-specific spanner will also make things easier.

          I would go with the 36t sprocket, much better for climbing and better for the motor in the long run.

          Cheers,
          Tony

          Reply
      • November 6, 2020 at 2:31 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony I have a couple of 2013 Raleigh Voyagers lx’s his and hers which I would like to convert to e bikes what would you recommend we cycle mainly in the peak district so very hilly.
        Thanks
        GK

        Reply
        • November 6, 2020 at 8:44 pm
          Permalink

          Hi,

          I’ve had a look at the specification of the 2013 Raleigh Voyager LX and it will be suitable for either a Bafang or Tongheng mid-drive. You could also fit a front or rear hub motor, but mid-drive motors are generally more efficient and better for climbing hills.

          Getting the right kit really depends on your specific needs, but assuming you want to stay on the right side of the law, then either the Tongsheng TSDZ2 or Bafang BBS01B (250w) would be ideal.

          The Tongsheng provides a more natural assistance, very similar to the Bosch motors commonly found on factory ebikes. The Bafang will start to give assist based on pedal rotation, whereas the Tongsheng responds to pedalling force (and cadence). The Bafang motor can be easily tuned using the configuration software available and a USB lead. The sensitivity of the Tongsheng torque sensor can be adjusted using advanced settings on the VLCD5 display.

          Both motors should comfortably get you up long, gradual climbs without too much trouble, although both will start to struggle a bit on sustained 15%+ climbs and you will still need to add reasonable amount of effort. If you require more power, the Tongsheng and Bafang 500w and 750w versions will get you up practically any hill with ease, but there are legal implications to consider.

          Regarding battery choice – this depends on the kind of assisted range you’re looking for. I always suggest at least a 36v 17Ah for 60 miles, but if you’re doing shorter rides a 13Ah will suffice. On the ladies version it’s likely you’ll need a rack battery as there won’t be enough space in the frame for a regular battery pack.

          There is a supplier on eBay I’ve used before selling the complete Bafang kit (with a choice of rack and frame battery) – Here is the link to their product page, they ship from within the UK.

          Here is a link to another seller on eBay who ships the Tongsheng TSDZ2 from Germany.

          If you wanted to buy a battery separately Batteryempireuk on eBay are a good supplier – I have purchased quite a few batteries from them in the past and they have all proven to be reliable over the long term.

          I hope this info helps, if you need any more advice, please let me know.

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
          • November 8, 2020 at 11:38 am
            Permalink

            Hi Tony many thanks for the info and the links much appreciated do you know of any hub motor kits with batteries that are good that would fit.
            Regards
            GK

          • November 8, 2020 at 3:05 pm
            Permalink

            Hi GK,

            The Yose Power kits available through eBay are excellent. I must have fitted well over 50 of these kits over the last couple of years without any issues. They do a 28″ rear wheel 350w hub motor kit with 36v 12.5Ah battery for £351, which is very good value for money (plus the motor controller is integrated into the battery mounting plate, making for a neater installation). They’re shipped from Poland, the last one I ordered turned up within about 5 working days. The nominal output is 100w above the legal limit, but the motor is identical to the 250w. They also do a 250w 28″ rear kit (without the battery), but they also sell batteries separately. If you decided to go for the kit, you could mount the battery on your wife’s bike on the rear rack (if you couldn’t fit it into the frame). Here is the link to the product page. If you click on ‘sellers other items’ you will see the other kits and batteries they have available.

            These kits are usually very reliable, they offer decent after sales service and a reasonable warranty. You can expect an assisted range of between 25-40 miles from the 12.5Ah battery (possibly more if you’re only using the assist on hills).

            Regards,
            Tony

          • November 9, 2020 at 4:55 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Tony I’ll take a look at them I think I would prefer the hub for easier fitting, thanks for taking the time to provide all the suggestions its been a great help.
            Regards
            GK

          • November 9, 2020 at 5:39 pm
            Permalink

            You’re welcome. If you need any further advice, let me know.

            Regards,
            Tony

          • November 10, 2020 at 10:27 am
            Permalink

            Hi Tony I had a look at the 350 watt rear kit looks pretty good would be ideal could you just tell me if the cassette on the voyagers would be suitable its a shimano MF-TZ21 7 SPEED not sure if its the correct cassette/freewheel for the kit?
            thanks
            GK

          • November 10, 2020 at 5:36 pm
            Permalink

            Hi GK,

            I can confirm that the kit is compatible with a Shimano 7-speed screw-on freewheel.

            Regards,
            Tony

          • November 11, 2020 at 4:36 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Tony great thanks for all the info and help very much appreciated.
            Regards
            GK

          • November 11, 2020 at 7:48 pm
            Permalink

            You’re welcome.

          • November 18, 2020 at 9:50 am
            Permalink

            Hi Tony just an update, I fitted the Yose rear freewheel 26inch hub yesterday all was pretty straightforward, I had to drill the frame for the battery mount as the bottle holder holes didn’t line up which was easy enough and the width of the motor is a little larger than the 138mm advertised I would say it is more like 140/142 but managed to get just enough play on the forks for it to fit in. All in all took about 2 1/2 hours I didn’t fit the brake levers or the throttle. It works well, nice neat install with the controller being in the battery mount, doesn’t feel like there is much assistance on levels 1 and 2 but power really kicks in on levels 3 4 5, and it shoots up hills on level 5 with minimum effort.
            Thanks again for the info and help.

          • November 18, 2020 at 3:52 pm
            Permalink

            Hi GK,

            Thanks for the update, much appreciated. I’ve just installed the same kit on a Marin hybrid for a customer and I had the same issue with the battery. I don’t usually install the brake levers and throttle either. I agree with the assist levels, I reckon level 3 is the sweet spot for general riding and reasonable battery range.

            All the best,
            Tony

      • November 16, 2020 at 9:18 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony

        Have you done any of the 2020 model Voodoo Bizango 29ers and are they as compatible and easy as the older version.

        Thanks

        Keith

        Reply
        • November 17, 2020 at 11:38 am
          Permalink

          Hi Keith,

          I’ve checked the specification of the latest Voodoo Bizango and it should be compatible as it uses a SRAM Powerspline 73mm threaded bottom bracket. I’ve just converted a brand-new Boardman hardtail MTB with a very similar specification and the only issue I had was there wasn’t enough thread left on the motor axle to fit the outer lockring. I also needed to use longer Allen bolts and spacers for the mounting plate and motor. Apart from that, everything went smoothly.

          Regards,
          Tony

          Reply
      • November 26, 2020 at 7:39 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony, I am looking at fitting the 750w 48v to a nearly new Pashly princess sovereign, I was thinking of the 52 chainring( it has 8 speed stermy archer) my thinking is on full power, more speed, also when using the thumb throttle does the crank have a freewheel or is it turned along with your legs by the motor. Thank you for the very informative article and thank you in advance for your reply

        Reply
        • November 26, 2020 at 9:04 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Andrew,

          I don’t see any problem with fitting a 52t chainring, you will need to fit a gearshift sensor and also get the USB lead and controller configuration software. When fitting the BBS02 48v with internally geared hubs you should reduce the ‘start current’ on the pedal assist and throttle to less than 10% to reduce wear and tear on the hub. There is a freewheel in the motor so when you use the throttle function the pedals don’t spin.

          The only other potential problem I can see is the type of bottom bracket fitted. I couldn’t find this on the Pashley website but I’m assuming it’s a BSA 68mm threaded bottom bracket, but sometimes bikes with geared hubs have an eccentric bottom bracket to facilitate chain tensioning. On the older style eccentric BB there are pinch bolts on the underside of the BB shell (which would get in the way of the motor), but the later ones are usually integrated. I’ve fitted the Bafang motor to bikes with these types of BB before, but you will not be able to adjust chain tension (unless you remove the motor).

          I hope this helps, if you have any more questions, please let me know.

          Regards,
          Tony

          Reply
        • November 28, 2020 at 4:56 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Tony, which display do you recommend and can you adjust the start percentages in the display?
          Thank you

          Reply
          • November 28, 2020 at 5:10 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Andrew,

            Either the P850c or DP-C18 are the best displays currently available. The only thing you can configure through the display is assisted speed limit and the amount of assist levels – 3, 5 or 9. If you want to reduce the start current percentages you will need to buy a USB lead and download the free Bafang configuration software.

            Regards,
            Tony

  • August 25, 2020 at 10:13 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    Brilliant review thank you. What set up would you suggest for a Gazelle Chamonix C7. I was going to buy a ready made electric ebike but I’m so tempted to covert my C7 as I just love it until I come to any hills which is all I really need the power for. There are so many sellers on ebay and such selling a variety of different options. The Bafang kit does seem most appealing but unsure of which model to go for. Being a large bike with a rear rack this seems to be the best placement for the battery. I would have to remove my fully enclosed chain guard though but the bike is worth it. Any help suggesting the best set would be much appreciated.
    Regards
    Nigel

    Reply
    • August 25, 2020 at 7:30 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Nigel,

      I’m not 100% sure but I think the Gazelle uses a Thompson bottom bracket, which means you may need to get a shim machined in order to fit the Bafang mid-drive motor. I did have a look on their website, but couldn’t find the BB type in the specification list. If I’m wrong and it uses a standard BSA threaded bottom bracket then installation should be fairly straightforward. If you can remove the chainguard and take a close-up photo of the bottom bracket and the area around the crank, I should be able to tell for sure – my email is cycletek@outlook.com.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 23, 2020 at 3:01 pm
    Permalink

    Hi, i am serious MTB’er have 2 bikes a full susser and a steel 650b HT. I’d like to convert the HT to a winter off road and use for commuting. My off road rides can be half dayers, I’m in SE England – fairly hilly what do you reckon would be my best motor and set up? Currently running single ring up front on a 30 tooth and 11-42 10 speed rear cassette. Thinking 500 0r 750 watt? Cheers

    Reply
    • August 23, 2020 at 4:51 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Mark,

      I reckon the best set-up would be a BBS02B 750w and a 48v 17Ah battery. If you’re going to be using it off-road a lot then it would definitely be worth making a few tweaks to the controller settings using a USB lead and the software. I usually change the max current from 25A down to 18A and lower the start current on the pedal assist settings to 10%. You can also alter the ‘keep current’ which relates to power drop as pedalling cadence increases – there is an excellent guide to using the software on the ElectricBike-Blog.com.

      I would personally just use it as pedal assist as I’ve had loads of controllers get fried when people rely on the throttle too much. As far as gearing is concerned, I would try PreciAlps – they are a French company that specialise in 104 BCD adaptors, and CNC narrow-wide chainrings for the Bafang motor. They go as low as 32t, but you might want to go a bit higher as having the motor makes a lot of difference. I used to run a 36t with an 11-36 cassette and I found that just fine for bombing around Bodmin moor.

      You should be okay with the 11-42 10-speed, although you will find the chainline is off a fair bit on the lowest two or three gears (particularly the 42t), usually with a bit of fine-adjustment of the derailleur you can get the indexing to be acceptable.

      I used to get around 80 miles from a 48v 17.5Ah battery with around 6000ft of elevation using low to medium assist, so it should be more than enough for half a day in the saddle. Bestebikes on Aliexpress are doing a good deal at the moment on the BBS02B 750w with a 48v 17Ah battery and DP-C18 colour display – Here is the link (they ship from Spain or Poland so delivery is fairly quick).

      I hope this helps, if you need any more info let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 16, 2020 at 8:22 am
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    8

    Ease of Installation

    8

    Efficiency

    8.5

    Hi Tony, about two months ago you gave me advice which I took about converting a bike. I used your links and got everything. I have a Bafang 750W BBS02 with 48V 17.5Ah battery fitted to carerra subway 1 with a 8 speed rear cassette and a 44t chainring. I also got a programming cable and gear shift sensor. My only concern is I feel as though my legs are going so fast to keep up I am not getting any benefit. Do I change my cassette? Or is there anything I can do in the programme so I can keep up with my bike? Thanks

    Reply
    • August 17, 2020 at 9:51 am
      Permalink

      Hi Richie,

      It may be worth increasing the gearing on the front from 44t to 48t. You should be able to get a larger chainring from Amazon or eBay. The other option is to check out the Programming guide and modify the pedal assist settings – you can alter things around so when you’re pedalling cadence increases above a certain level the motor will start to back off. You can also change the level of assist the motor gives you in each power setting.

      I hope this helps. If you need any advice on re-configuring the controller, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
    • September 15, 2020 at 2:33 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Nigel, I’m just fitted the bbs02b motor, it seems fine with the initial speed build up then seems to give less and less power assist so I usually have to feed it some thumb throttle, is that normal for that motor or is there a problem do you think.

      Reply
      • September 15, 2020 at 7:07 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Adrian,

        It sounds to me like the ‘keep current’ is set too low in the controller configuration settings. I’ve found on some BBS02B motors this is set as low as 25, which means the total current is reduced by up to 75% once pedalling rpm reaches a certain speed. The only way to change this is get a programming lead and follow the instructions for changing the settings using the free Bafang configuration software.

        If you set the ‘keep current’ to around 80, it should resolve the problem.

        All the best,
        Tony

        Reply
    • December 21, 2020 at 10:16 pm
      Permalink

      Value for Money

      6

      Ease of Installation

      10

      Efficiency

      10

      Lol I found that, I like the throttle as laying bricks all day, it’s nice having 33mph.
      But after 34 miles after the ride and making sure I was in the right gears etc.
      Made it home and got up the next day turned the lcd on and on it come and 4 seconds later poof. My battery 35amp fuse blows. Put another fuse in and bang.
      Was told by Johnny nerd out to turn the back wheel and if its hard to turn then the controller is blown.
      Im thinking after taking of the charger I put the battery on with the on switch on and that may have done it.

      Reply
  • August 2, 2020 at 1:20 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    7

    Ease of Installation

    7

    Efficiency

    7

    Hello! Tony
    Thank you for the great site.

    Do you have any trouble with the one-way clutch?
    Strong pedaling seems to pull out the gear(BBS02B750W)
    I replaced the one-way clutch.
    But it does not completely resolve.
    Is there another problem?

    By the way
    To use a 750W unit in Japan
    I installed security parts.
    Registered as MOTO. And
    I took out insurance.
    I also pay taxes.
    What are EU people doing?

    Reply
    • August 2, 2020 at 9:08 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Kazushi,

      If you have replaced the circular pawl clutch it’s important that the pawls are properly meshed and the meshing contact is properly cleaned. Here is a link to a very good instructional thread on electricbike.com.

      In the EU most people (that I’m aware of) don’t tend to register their e-bikes, instead they are careful when using their conversions as to not arouse suspicion from the law. This includes limiting the speed and power when riding in urban areas and riding carefully and not at excessive speed in public places. The police will not generally bother someone riding an electric bike as long as they are pedalling and riding sensibly.

      I hope this helps. If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • July 15, 2020 at 8:19 pm
    Permalink

    I am extremely new to the e-bike world. I am having the hardest time finding a reputable rear wheel 48 volt e-bike kit. I have already purchased a 52 volt 14ah battery. I wouldn’t mind trying a mid-drive but I keep hearing that they are harder on the bike. Can you give me some advice on reasons to buy or not buy a mid-drive? I would be putting it on a Giant Sedona comfort bike 15 inch frame and will mostly be riding on roads that aren’t terribly hilly with my 10 year old son (could eventually do some mild mountain bike trails). I appreciate any advice you have on both good reputable rear wheel kits that are available and why or why not I should consider or not consider a mid-drive. Thanks in advance!

    Reply
    • July 16, 2020 at 8:39 am
      Permalink

      Hi Dana,

      For simplicity and reliability, I would be inclined to go for a 48v Bafang rear hub motor – these are generally very reliable and can be used with a 52v battery. Mid-drive motors are more efficient and produce more torque (rotational force) but they can cause premature wear and tear on the drive-train of the bike. In my experience geared hub motors are fairly straightforward to sort out if they do go wrong (which is rare), mid-drives tend to be more problematic. One good thing about the Bafang mid-drive is it’s easy to reprogram – I find setting the controller limit to 18A and reducing the start-up current in the controller settings seems to make them a lot less prone to issues. I used a 52v / BBS02 750w for 12 months and 2000 miles without any problems. Here is a link to a seller on Amazon.com who has good feedback ratings, although I think they probably ship direct from China. Ebikeling do a good range of rear hub motors and ship from within the US – here is a link to their conversion kits on eBay.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 8:26 am
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    10

    Ease of Installation

    10

    Efficiency

    10

    Hi Tony

    What’s the best power setting mode climbing single track?

    Thanks for making this website and offering advice on the bbs02b

    I have ordered one and can’t wait to give my legs a bit of help on hills.

    I plan on doing single track climbing. I don’t want to burn the motor/controller out so wanted some advice please?
    My bike is an Orange p7 Hard tail
    I have got the 36t bling ring up front and a 42 11speed cassette. I was planning on using the lower power modes when climbing? Would I be better to use max power or tweaking setting? Don’t want to blow anything up!
    Many thanks for any advice Or suggestions.

    Reply
    • July 3, 2020 at 10:11 am
      Permalink

      Hi Jeff,

      If you buy the USB programming lead and download the software, I would start by limiting the max current on the controller from 25A down to 18A, this will still give you peak power of over 800w, but be a lot kinder to the controller. Another important setting is the pedal assist start up current. I generally set this to 10% (down from 20%). I don’t recommend using the throttle as overuse seems to increase the risk of controller failure. If you do choose to fit the throttle, reduce the start up current to 10% and use ‘current mode’. You will also need to increase the ‘keep current’ setting on PAS to around 75% – this is important if you want to use the bike at a higher pedalling cadence. And most importantly stick with a 48v battery, I never had any issues with a 52v myself, but I’ve had quite a few controller failures on customer bikes when using 52v. Here is the link to Karls Electric Bike Blog for the detailed article on Bafang programming – it’s a few years old now, but all the settings still apply to the latest version.

      I hope this helps, if you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • July 3, 2020 at 10:37 am
        Permalink

        Value for Money

        10

        Ease of Installation

        10

        Efficiency

        10

        Brilliant! Thanks for the advice and getting back so quick. I have ordered the 48v battery 800 watts is plenty so will reduce the ams to.

        Cheers Jeff

        Reply
        • July 3, 2020 at 4:04 pm
          Permalink

          You’re welcome, glad to help.

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
  • May 25, 2020 at 11:30 pm
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    Hi Tony,
    one of the best reviews for this kit. I saved the link of this age in a file to get back to it as I want to buy this kit. I have to questions and I would appreciate if you can help:
    1. I live in a hilly area. I love riding long distances. Considering this 2 aspects, which of the two Bafang kits would you recommend – BBS02B 750w or BBSHD? Bear in mind that I don’t care about speed or using the throttle at all.
    2. Do you think it would be ok to buy 2 batteries and carry one in the backpack to use them both in a ride? Does it take long to change between them? I got the idea that the 48V 17.5 A battery is the better choice.
    3. Could I keep the weight of the bike around 20 kilos with the battery off? I have a bike rack for the car that has this limit.
    Thanks for all.

    Reply
    • May 26, 2020 at 8:03 am
      Permalink

      Hi Dan,

      My personal experience of the BBS02B 750w is positive, I had 2000 trouble-free miles over 12 months. Although I have had multiple controller failures on customer builds. More recently (in the last year or so) I haven’t had any issues reported so far – this has been since I started only fitting 48v batteries and limiting the maximum current to 18A.

      If you are planning longer hilly rides, the BBSHD should definitely be more reliable in the long term, especially if it is used in the lower power levels, it runs a lot cooler and is a bit more efficient than the BBS02.

      I used to get a range of about 80 miles from a 48v 17.5Ah battery (on a BBSHD) using low to moderate assist, so if you had two of these there would be the potential for 160 miles.

      As far as weight is concerned. If you are fitting the motor kit to a hybrid of mountain bike that weighs in the region of 14kg, the BBS02B will add about 4.2kg and the BBSHD 4.8kg, so you will be close to your 20kg limit (without the battery fitted).

      Thanks for your positive comments. If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • May 12, 2020 at 11:30 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony
    thank you for your very informative article about the Bafang BBS02 48 volt 750 w
    I have two bikes I am considering converting to e-bikes –
    1. Giant Boulder 26 inch
    2. Avanti Discovery 1 700C
    Would you recommend this motor for either of these bikes mentioned.
    Could you please tell me if there is a difference between the BBS02 and the BBS02B and if so which would be your preference.
    thank you and look forward to hearing from you… regards Scott Bancroft

    Reply
    • May 13, 2020 at 8:13 am
      Permalink

      Hi Scott,

      The Bafang motor will fit both of the bikes you have, as they both use threaded sealed cartridge bottom brackets. Looking at the specifications they should be fairly straightforward to convert.

      The BBS02B replaced the BBS02 a few years back. The BBS02 is no longer available as far as I know. The ‘B’ model had upgraded MOSFET’s in the controller, and the later models usually have a separate gearshift sensor connector coming off the motor and a connector for lights.

      I hope this helps, if you need any more info please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • May 13, 2020 at 8:35 am
        Permalink

        Thanks Tony for your prompt reply
        I’m looking at the Bafang motor for sale from EVcomponents.com showing
        BBS02 48v 750w on the motor and wondering if it might be old stock
        I would appreciate your thoughts
        Thanks again for your input
        Cheers scott

        Reply
        • May 13, 2020 at 10:01 am
          Permalink

          Looking at the photo’s on their website it’s hard to tell – I zoomed in and couldn’t see a gearshift sensor plug (which is on the very latest model). It might be worth contacting them just to make sure. The serial number on the motor should have BBS02B on it.

          Reply
  • May 10, 2020 at 3:53 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    I am interested in installing a mid drive motor on my tandem bike. Would this be a problem?

    Roy

    Reply
    • May 10, 2020 at 4:14 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Roy,

      If your tandem is of traditional design then you would not be able to install a Bafang motor due to the chainring configuration. Most tandems I have come across have a left hand crankset (on the front) going to a l/h/s rear crank which in turn has a r/h/s crank going to the rear gear cassette. Another issue is most tandems have an eccentric bottom bracket (for chain tension between front and rear). If yours is of the old type that has pinch bolts underneath the bottom bracket shell, these will prevent motor installation.

      The only electric conversions I have done on tandems have been front wheel hub motors – mainly on Dawes Galaxy and Ridgeback tandems.

      If you have any more questions, let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 26, 2020 at 4:43 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks Tony, this is by far the most informative article on the Bafang mid-motors I’ve found. Saw your positive comment on the BBS02B, still true in 2020?
    Noticed your mention to stay away from 52V. What is your take on battery size? 12AH? 17AH? Other?
    The trails near me can have continuous 1000 ft climbs, reaching over 12,000 ft elevation, so that’s my typical use. Don’t need to go fast, just me and the dog enjoying an outing.
    I’m drawn to the 02B for its smaller size, weight, cost but will go for the HD if you suggest. Plan to mount the motor on this bike: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/full-suspension-mountain-bikes/fantomds-eagle-sx-comp-full-suspension.htm
    Also found an eBay seller offering 32-38T chainrings for the 02 for under $25.
    AliExpress seems to have the best balance of price and options so I’ll go through your link when I purchase.

    Thanks again for sharing your knowledge. 🙂

    Reply
    • April 26, 2020 at 7:08 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Roger,

      The BBS02 should fit the Motobecane MTB, my only concern is having limited space for a decent sized battery pack. Luna Cycle have some pretty good 48v battery packs available and they might be able to custom-build one to fit in the frame. The other alternative is to go for a seat post mounted battery, but these put the weight at the back end and high up, which I personally don’t like. The other option is to have a battery in a back pack.

      Regarding voltage, I would err on the side of caution and stick with a 48v. I ran my BBS02 750w for about 2000 miles on a 52v and never had any problems, but I reprogrammed the controller to limit the max current to 20A and I lowered the start up current and ramp-up.

      Considering the climbing you’re going to be doing I would have to say the HD is going to be more up to the job. There is a YT video from Luna Cycle of a 300lb guy riding one up a long steep climb in California and the motor barely got warm.

      Thanks for the complements, glad you like my website. If you have any more questions, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 8, 2020 at 7:27 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Toney,

    I’m happy that I got my new Stevens bike a few days now.

    One more question, I now have a front chain wheel of 48 which I always use, the smaller blades 38 and 28 I never use, because the lack of speed 🙂
    Because the mid-motor has a ratio of 1:21.9 is it therefore still better to choose the smaller (44) chain wheel or can I just go for the same maximum size off 48?

    What would you advice to do?
    Thanks in advance.

    Best regards,
    Martin

    Reply
    • April 9, 2020 at 11:18 am
      Permalink

      Hi Martin,

      If you’re used to a 48t you will be fine with the 46t or 48t Bafang chainring. Smaller chainrings are only beneficial if you have lots steep climbs to negotiate.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 1, 2020 at 12:28 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    What a great website with very usefull information, many thanks!

    I would like to buy a new bike and want to know if a BSS02 48V 750W kit will fit on this one:
    https://www.stevensbikes.de/2020/index.php?bik_id=47&cou=EN&lang=en_EN

    Also do you know if the Shimano M355 Hydraulic Brake cut off set, will fit on the current Tektro break gear?
    And is the left 8-speed gear is enough to reach 30-35 km/ h at least with this setup?

    Thanks in advance.

    Best regards,
    Martin

    Reply
    • April 1, 2020 at 4:01 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Martin,

      Thank you for your positive comments, much appreciated.

      Looking at the specification of the Jazz Gent, it looks like the kind of hybrid bike that should be a very straightforward conversion. I’ve converted quite a few Bergamont trekking bikes which are very similar in design.

      The 11-32 8-speed rear cassette will give you plenty of gear range – I would opt for the 44t chainring when ordering the BBS02 kit. When I had a similar set-up you could pedal comfortably to 40km/h.

      The Shimano M355 hydraulic brakes should be a straight swap from the Tektro brakes fitted. Depending on your brake arrangement – UK bikes tend to have front brake lever on the right and rear brake on the left, some of the suppliers will need you to specify, otherwise you may need to swap hydraulic hoses and bleed the brakes.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Best wishes,
      Tony

      Reply
      • April 1, 2020 at 8:06 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,

        Many thanks for your quick reply!
        I really appreciate all your great effort for us biking people (please remove my 2nd post, as I was not able to see my 1st one anymore)

        This is very usable information, also about the best front chainring.
        In NL we have the same brake lever arrangement as in UK with your advice I’m now be able to order my bike tomorrow.

        Thanks again, take care a stay healty with Covid-19!

        Best regards,
        Martin

        Reply
        • April 1, 2020 at 10:19 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Martin,

          Glad to have been of assistance.

          Best Wishes,
          Tony

          Reply
    • April 1, 2020 at 4:32 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Martin,

      Thank you for your positive comments, much appreciated.

      The Jazz Gent should be a fairly straightforward conversion. I have converted quite a few very similar Bergamont trekking bikes without any issues.

      With a gear ration of 11-32 8-speed – if you order a 44t front chainring, you will be able to pedal up to around 40km/h without too much trouble.

      Regarding the brakes, the Shimano M355 hydraulic brakes with cut-off should be a straight swap. The only thing to consider is you will need to specify with the supplier if your brakes are configured front brake (right hand lever) rear brake (left hand lever). Some countries have their brakes the other way around.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Best Wishes,
      Tony

      Reply
    • April 17, 2020 at 3:49 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Tony looking to do my 1st conversion I have a whyte 603 2015 just not really sure what to go for does weight come into equation when choosing what size motor to buy dont really want a free ride all the time just now and again and what battery is best for the motor

      Reply
      • April 17, 2020 at 8:12 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Alan,

        The Whyte 603 should be a nice and straightforward bike to convert. The Bafang motor weighs 4.2kg vs 3.6kg for the Tongsheng TSDZ2. I have used both motors for long rides and personally I prefer the Tongsheng as I like the torque-sensing pedal assist. I owned a Bafang BBS02 hybrid for nearly a year and that provided more assist than I needed in anything above assist level 3 (out of 9 levels). If you’re looking for assistance once in a while either the TSDZ2 250w or Bafang BBS01B 250w will give you just enough power and you’ll still get a decent workout when you go cycling.

        I’ve always felt the TSDZ2 has slightly less pedalling resistance (with the motor switched off) than the Bafang, but apparently it can vary from motor to motor. As far as reliability is concerned, I have installed nearly 40 TSDZ2 motors and only ever had a couple of minor issues. The Bafang motors are generally reliable if ridden sensibly. I’ve only ever had one BBS01B fail (out of about 50) and that was after 14 months and nearly 2000 miles of use.

        One thing to bear in mind with the TSDZ2 is there is limited clearance for gear cables routed underneath the bottom bracket, so you might need to re-route the cable.

        The TSDZ2 has a fixing clamp (to stop the motor moving in the bottom bracket) whereas the Bafang relies on a steel mounting plate that has ridges which dig into the alloy surrounding the bottom bracket shell (when the lockring is tightened) – sometimes I find Bafang motors start to move and need re-tightening after a while. You can purchase a stabiliser bar from Luna Cycle in the US, i’m not aware of anyone in the UK selling them.

        As far as battery is concerned, it really depends on how far you want to travel on a single charge. If you’re after a range of 35-50 miles, a good quality 36v11.6Ah battery will do the job. Here is a link to a supplier I have used many times on eBay.

        If you need any more advice, please let me know.

        All the best,
        Tony

        Reply
        • April 18, 2020 at 9:30 am
          Permalink

          Cheers Tony thanks for the quick reply by the way great site 👍

          Reply
          • April 18, 2020 at 11:28 am
            Permalink

            Thanks, hope the conversion goes well for you, and if you need any more advice, let me know.

  • March 27, 2020 at 6:36 am
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    Value for Money

    0

    Ease of Installation

    0

    Efficiency

    1.5

    Hi I’m glad I came across this website as this has a lot of info in converting MTB to ebikes. I do have a question would a 2017 specialized stumpjumper 29er be ok to convert? If so what do you recommend? Thanks in advance.

    Roland

    Reply
    • March 28, 2020 at 10:53 am
      Permalink

      Hi Roland,

      You’re going to be a bit limited on what you can fit as your bike has a PF30 pressfit bottom bracket and thru-axles on the rear. So a hub motor will be out of the question and a regular mid-drive like the bafang will require you get e BB30 to BSA adaptor. Luna Cycles will be the guys to talk to, they have lots of experience converting full suspension MTB’s and they have custom-made battery packs that can fit in the limited space available in your frame. I believe they also stock PF bottom bracket shims and also motor stabilizer bars (for the Bafang).

      I hope this information helps.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • March 1, 2020 at 1:25 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    I have another question if you don’t mind. Are bbs01b and bbs02b the same motors, just different controllers?

    I found that unit and parts both are the same. Only difference I could spot was that bbs02b is heavier by 300 grams.

    Cheers,
    Siv

    Reply
    • March 1, 2020 at 9:57 am
      Permalink

      Hi Siv,

      The BBS02B has a wider stator (5mm I believe) and different winding, the BBS02 will also operate at a higher motor rpm.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • February 22, 2020 at 12:29 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks Tony.

    Info was quite helpful.

    I was intending to upgrade the controller for a FOC based in anyway. So thought to buy the cheapest bbs02b.

    Cheers,
    Siv

    Reply
    • February 22, 2020 at 1:35 pm
      Permalink

      Glad to have been of help.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • February 9, 2020 at 8:35 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for the review.

    Do you know if all bbs02b – 350, 500, 750 units are the same just with different controllers or are motors and gears etc different too?

    Cheers.

    Reply
    • February 10, 2020 at 12:22 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,

      In my experience all BBS02B motors are same, the only difference being the motor controller (ECU) and the firmware settings within. I have swapped out a 36v25A 500w controller before for a 48v25A 750w controller (plus 48v battery) without any issues. Not too sure about the 350w version though as I have only delt with BBS01B 350w 36v.

      If you need any more info, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • January 8, 2020 at 10:39 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony! thank you for this review! very useful! wish I had read it before I bought my kit though.
    I did install the drive in my very reliable old Trek Fuel EX 7.5, and used 2 crossed 2cm wide tapes and silicone to keep the engine snug to the frame (else it drops down too low and rolls around on offroad trails). The bike shop guy said it was weird that i didn’t come with a securing system, but thats how it came in the kit…
    Anyway, the supplier had ran out of 750w controllers so I got one that goes up to 1200w instead with 3 power levels. Hope that’s not the root of my problems:
    Whenever I power the bike on, I tend to get ERR 8 code. I power on and off several times or cycle with “0” assist for a minute, than turn assist on and it’s working fine again. It won’t trouble me anymore for the rest of the ride so long as I don’t turn the controller off. You have any experience with this? should I ask for a replacement? I just installed this kit a month ago.
    Its the BBS02 500-750w model. The battery is a Green Cell 48V 14.7Ah. I rarely use throtle unless when carrying the bike beside me up a very steep gravel path (im not on it and it weights 27kg!)

    thanks again in advance!

    Reply
    • January 8, 2020 at 8:27 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Ana,

      The mounting can be a particular issue on the BBS motors, as you are relying on the mounting plate and lock-nut to keep the motor from moving in the bottom bracket shell. It varies from bike to bike. Luna Cycles in the States do a Bafang stabiliser bar for full suspension and hardtail bikes – here is the link.

      When you refer to the controller, do you mean the display? The Bafang BBS02 750w will produce 1200w of peak power in standard form using a 48v battery. Error code 08 is usually down to the hall sensor (inside the motor itself). Do you know what model display / controller you have fitted? Most of the Bafang displays will allow up to 9 levels of pedal assist (apart from some DP-C18 colour displays). You should be able to alter the number of assist levels in the advanced settings menu – if you can find the model of display you are using, I can send you a link to the correct user manual.

      Faulty hall sensor signals can be caused by a number of reasons: A poor connection (inside the motor), a bad solder or an actual fault with the hall sensor. Either way, I would keep an eye on it and if the problem persists I would contact the seller.

      If you need any more help, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • December 28, 2019 at 7:58 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony, I read that the Bafang BBS02 has a “Coaster Brake”. Is this like a Back Pedal Brake ? If so how is it achieved as I notice on a stationary (not running) bike with such a motor that when reverse pedal action is applied…it seems to be in “free wheel” state. ???

    Reply
    • December 29, 2019 at 12:12 am
      Permalink

      Hi Ralph,

      I have never come across a Bafang BBS motor that has a coaster brake function, only the Tongsheng TSDZ2 motor. Although I did find this thread on Endless-Sphere discussing the possibilities. From what I’ve read so far, it would be easier to stick with the TSDZ2 if this function is required.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • December 6, 2019 at 7:18 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for the reply, Tony. On additional question, it doesn’t appear that any of the display units are removable. Is that true? Do you have any recommendations for making sure it doesn’t get messed with or stolen? Aside from don’t park the bike in dark alleys.

    Thanks.

    Reply
    • December 7, 2019 at 9:30 am
      Permalink

      Hi Chris,

      Unfortunately, none of the Bafang displays are easily removable. You would need to carry either a 2mm or 2.5mm Allen key to remove the display from the handlebar and unplug the connector. It should only take a couple of minutes.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • December 4, 2019 at 7:42 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    Great site! Super helpful!
    I’m going to convert my wife’s size small Cannondale Bad Boy commuter bike to an ebike with the Bafang kit. We live in Portland, OR where it rains a fair amount and her commute will take her up a 1,000ft hill. With the rain and the elevation gain, would the 750w motor be enough or should I opt for the HD?

    Thanks,
    Chris

    Reply
    • December 4, 2019 at 10:37 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Chris,

      Thanks for your complements, glad you like my site.

      Regarding the motor selection, the BBS02 750w should be more than adequate as far as power is concerned. But for long-term reliability, the HD seems to be more robust (in my experience).

      Having said that, I used a BBS02 powered hybrid bike for 12 months and 2000 miles and never had any problems. I was 280lbs (at the time) and used to regularly climb 2000-3000ft on an average ride of 30 miles.

      I’ve converted a couple of Cannondale Bad Boys in the past, it should be a fairly straightforward conversion. If you need any more advice, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • December 2, 2019 at 5:23 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony, I just bought the BBS02 750W and after hooking it up the error code 30 appears and m stuck. try reconnecting the connectors several time and still the same. BTW i am using the DP C18 display
    hope you can help

    Reply
    • December 2, 2019 at 10:44 am
      Permalink

      Hi Derek,

      There are several things that could be causing the error code. Make sure none of the connector pins between the wiring loom and motor are bent. If they are alright, then the fault could be with the wiring loom itself (I have come across this a couple of time before). It is also possible there is a fault with the display.

      The worse can scenario is a fault with the controller itself (in the motor). If this is the case, then you would need to contact the supplier for a replacement under warranty.

      If the connector pins are looking good, I would contact the supplier to see if they can send you a new wiring harness out. If it is still showing the error code after that, then it’s going to be either the display or motor controller.

      Please let me know how you get on.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • November 16, 2019 at 1:50 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony, we can rely on you to be not only prompt, but succinct and precise in your replies. Much appreciated.
    Cheers,
    Mak

    Reply
  • November 15, 2019 at 7:38 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony, couple more questions please. What is a good, reliable display for the 500 watt Bafang? Ditto for the 750 watt Bafang (in case the 500 watt is out of stock).
    Also, what reliable options are there for aftermarket controllers?
    Thanks for your time again.
    Mak

    Reply
    • November 15, 2019 at 10:15 am
      Permalink

      Hi Mak,

      For reliability, I always go for the old style C965 display. It’s quite basic, but it is reliable and cheap to replace if it goes wrong. The P850c colour display is also fairly good. The newer DP-C18 display can be problematic, and only allows 5 levels of pedal assist (depending on the firmware), whereas the others allow up to 9 levels.

      I have purchase a few replacement controllers from okfeet on Aliexpress, and they have always been reliable. They have good customer service as well. They are not the cheapest on Aliexpress, but they seem reliable.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • November 12, 2019 at 3:33 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony, thanks for the prompt reply. Please keep up the good work. Not many will do it gratis!
    Cheers,
    Mak

    Reply
    • November 12, 2019 at 9:33 am
      Permalink

      Thanks Mak, glad to have been of assistance.
      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • July 19, 2020 at 9:45 pm
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        Value for Money

        10

        Ease of Installation

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        Efficiency

        10

        Hi Tony,

        Thanks for all the information here. I have just bought a Carrera crossfire 2 bike and the 750w bbs02b kit. I’m hoping it will be a straightforward convertion!

        What’s your advice on the cleanest look with regards to all the wires etc and is the stock software configuration OK to use (commuting mainly and no lary abuse!) or should I start playing about with the settings?

        Thanks

        Matt

        Reply
        • July 20, 2020 at 7:40 am
          Permalink

          Hi Matt,

          I’ve converted a few Carrera Crossfire’s using the Bafang motor and it’s usually fairly straightforward. The only issue I’ve had is they tend not to grease the bottom bracket’s too well and they can sometimes require a lot of force to remove. I would recommend you have a long breaker bar at hand just in case.

          Also you need to watch the threads on the crankarms / crankset when you remove them as they tend to be made of Swiss cheese (plus they don’t always grease the BB axles) – when you’ve removed the Allen bolts and screwed in the crank puller, make sure it’s tightened fully in the thread (usually with a 17mm spanner) before you try to remove them. Once you have the crankset and bottom bracket removed the rest should be plain sailing.

          Regarding the wiring, I usually route it on the underside of the diagonal downtube (along side the existing gear cable). There is always quite a lot of excess wiring to tidy up, it’s usually best to use a few small cable ties to bunch up and secure the excess wire so it doesn’t make contact with the chain. I sometimes use those small plastic cable clips (with strong self-adhesive backing) to hold the wire in place.

          Regarding the configuration, I find one of the best settings to use is Karl’s Special sauce, but with the max current set to 18A – this reduces the peak power somewhat, but is kinder to the controller in the long term.

          If you have any more questions, let me know.

          Cheers,
          Tony

          Reply
  • November 11, 2019 at 6:27 am
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    Value for Money

    10

    Ease of Installation

    0

    Efficiency

    0

    Hi Tony, I have a 2011 Intense Uzzi with 73mm bottom bracket. Will the BBS02 clear the chainstay? Also, is the 500 watt version more reliable than the 750 watt? I don’t plan to go off-road often.
    I must say you are doing a great service helping old riders get back into serious cycling again.
    Many thanks.
    Mak
    Malaysia

    Reply
    • November 11, 2019 at 10:36 am
      Permalink

      Hi Mak,

      I have looked at the specs and frame Geometry of the 2011 Intense Uzzi, and it looks like the BBS02 should clear the chainstay. I have fitted a lot of BBS02’s to full-suspension MTB’s and this isn’t usually a problem. Worse case scenario you may need to purchase a couple of spacers. These are listed for the BBSHD, but they should also for the BBS02.

      Regarding reliability, in my experience the 36v 500w version is much more reliable than the 48v 750w version. I have only ever had one controller failure on a 500w, but I have had about 12 failures on 48v 750w controllers. What I do now with the 750w is only use a 48v battery and limit the maximum current to 18A, and reduce the start current to 10%. I haven’t had any issues with the 48v 750w BBS02 this year so far.

      Thanks you for your positive feedback, glad you are finding my site helpful. If you have any more questions, please let me know.

      Kind Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
    • April 29, 2020 at 1:02 pm
      Permalink

      Tony, I have a question for you, if I buy a restricted mid motor from bafang from germany for example, is there any posibilty I can unblock it at home?
      Best regards

      Reply
      • April 29, 2020 at 8:28 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Marcel,

        I haven’t come across any Bafang mid-drive motors that have been factory restricted, and I have purchased quite a few from Germany. It is possible that this may happen due to tighter restrictions. The only way I can see a Bafang motor being speed-restricted would be to set the limit (at the display) from the factory with a different pass code for the advanced settings feature. This could be bypassed by purchasing a different display. Another way the motor could be restricted would be at the controller (inside the motor) this could be lifted by purchasing a USB programming lead and downloading the free software. Depending on what display you choose, I have some user manuals available for download in my ‘resources’ section.

        If you have any more questions, please let me know.

        Regards,
        Tony

        Reply
  • November 7, 2019 at 5:49 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    Love this article. Very informative. I’m looking at installing a bafang BBS02B 36v500w on my wife’s Specialized Stumpjumper(26in) I think its a 73mm BB. She has a Ebikeling geared rear hub motor now and likes it except for continuous issues with the Cheap PAS and have tried aftermarket PAS with limited success. Also planning to install BBSHD on my old Gary Fisher Sugar 2(I think its 2001 or 2002) and I think its a 73 BB also. Do you see any issues with either of these builds? Secondly I will be getting the 500c displays. I think you can make changes to speed limit, start level, etc right from the display…do I need the USB programming cord? Thank you in advance!
    Tom

    Reply
    • November 7, 2019 at 8:11 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Tom,

      Glad you like the article, thanks for the feedback.

      You shouldn’t have any problems fitting the Bafang to the Stuntjumper, I’ve fitted them before to older Specialized MTB’s without any hassles.

      The Gary Fisher will be okay as well, I think it has a Hollowtech II type BB (threaded 73mm). I’ve done a Gary Fisher hardtail from the same era and that was a nice and straightforward conversion.

      The only issue you might have is getting a battery pack to fit in the limited frame space, but there are lots of different options available. My supplier does a 48v14ah battery in a frame bag, that might do the job.

      The 500c is a good little display, you can change the speed limit and PAS levels from the settings menu. For more advanced programming the USB lead is handy to have, you can change things like PAS settings to make the motor smoother. Here is a link to the best Bafang programming guide on the internet.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • November 11, 2019 at 8:50 am
        Permalink

        Hi Tony

        This has been invaluable info. Could you please give me a live tutorial? My Bafang display has stopped working and I can’t power on but I need a bit of guidance as all the tech terms go way over my head

        Reply
  • November 5, 2019 at 5:46 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Gary,

    I need some advice from you. I bought Cube Tm Pro and bafang bbs 02. Seller told me that this cube have PF 30 but in reality it is PF 41 bb92. So i bought Axle Extension 100 mm Press in modification kit for bafang + lekkie 42 t bling ring for better chain line. Now i need some Adapter to reduce pf 41 to BSA. You think that adapter like this will do the job ?
    https://ozo-electric.com/en/accessories-for-mid-drive-motors/1010-shimano-pressfit-bottom-bracket-adapter-for-bafang-middle-drive-motor-bbs.html

    or there is much more what i have to do.

    Best regards
    Slawek

    Reply
    • November 5, 2019 at 6:56 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Slawek,

      I have not used one of those adapters personally. The main problem when fitting the BBS motor in PF BB shells is the limited clearance between the motor shaft and housing, but looking at the way that adapter has been machined it should work.

      Let me know how things go.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 26, 2019 at 8:44 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    Have you ever fitted a BB02 to a Trek Roscoe 7? It comes with 28t sprocket as standard and the chain stays flare out barley any room at all.

    Thanks

    Reply
    • October 27, 2019 at 11:03 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Gary,

      I haven’t fitted a BBS02 to a Roscoe 7 before, but looking at the specs it might fit. The bottom bracket is the right spec, but the angle of the rear chainstay might be a problem.

      The main issue is a 73mm wide BB is at the limit of a standard BBS02 motor shaft, and if you need to use spacers (due to the chainstay angle) it won’t leave enough thread to fit the outer motor lockring. The other problem will be the front chainring offset. I have fitted BBS motors to bikes with a SRAM 1 x 11, 11-42 rear cassette before and whilst you could shift to the 42t at the rear, the offset would cause cogging, poor shifting and cause the chain to keep coming off.

      You can purchase a 104BCD chainring adapter for the Bafang, but not a 94BCD (which is the BCD size of your current chainring). I would maybe go for a 104BCD and up the gearing on the front to a 32t or 34t, which will be fine if you are doing mostly XC riding. You might need to set the limit screw on the rear mech to prevent shifting to the lowest gear.

      If you need any more info, let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 24, 2019 at 11:46 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    First of all. Thank you for posting so many good tips, tricks and sharing your knowledge. Very much appreciated 🙂

    I just ordered an aluminium frame to replace my carbon frame as I have lost a little faith in carbon as a material after my fork broke…
    I ordered the Octane One Prone 29″ Frame 2019 size L.
    I`m starting on a project to build a commuter bike and light trail bike, so think the Octane should be perfect…. If BBs02 fits…

    Do you think the BBS02 will fit… ?

    https://www.chainreactioncycles.com//no/en/octane-one-prone-29-frame-2019/rp-prod155477?utm_source=CRM&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=OrderConfirmation&utm_content=SCAN

    Reply
    • October 24, 2019 at 8:12 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Kristian,

      Glad you like my website, positive feedback is always appreciated?

      In answer to your question. The frame in question has a standard BSA 73mm threaded bottom bracket shell, so the BBS02 will indeed fit. The only issue you may have is 73mm is at the limit of the BBS02 motor shaft length. You will have enough thread to tighten the inner lockring, but you may not be able to fully tighten the outer lockring. This really depends on the angle of the chainstay. Apart from that you should be fine.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 23, 2019 at 9:26 pm
    Permalink

    Mine has not been reliable. I have the mid drive with 48v battery. Power kept cutting out, so bafang sent a new motor (didn’t have to purchase the entire kit. Now it is better but there are still mini surges and cut outs of power. This makes for a frustrating and unhappy riding experience. And on my husband’s bike, the controller sometimes just quits operating for no apparent reason, then comes on again. I do not consider this to be a reliable brand and would appreciate recommendations for alternatives.

    Reply
    • October 24, 2019 at 12:18 am
      Permalink

      This is one of the biggest downsides to Bafang mid-drive motors. There seems to be a definite lack of consistency regarding quality control across the range. I have experienced lots of issues with the BBS02B 48v, and very few with the 36v versions. Having installed well over a hundred of these motors over the last few years, the 36v models are much more reliable in my opinion.

      The only real viable alternative is the Tongsheng TSDZ2. I have installed a lot of these motors this year, and so far I haven’t had any issues. Unfortunately like the Bafang motor they can suffer from reliability issues.

      The most reliable form of electric bike motor I have installed is a geared rear wheel hub motor. They don’t produce the same kind of power as the mid-drive, but I have had zero motor failures out of maybe 80 or so installations.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 13, 2019 at 7:40 am
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    10

    Ease of Installation

    5

    Efficiency

    10

    Riding a Kona Jake the Snake CX bike with a BBS02B and 48v battery.

    I’m racking up 18 miles a day on a Monday-Friday commute, in rainy Manchester, UK. That includes a primary school drop off and pickup near home, so a variety of riding conditions.

    It’s saving me about £100/month on train tickets, so after 3 months the battery is paying for itself. Work bought my motor! Plus, it’s way faster. Train in Manchester are the worst, so many delays and cancellations. Don’t miss it, even when it’s pouring with rain.

    The only issues I’ve experienced are 2 instances of creaking, both fixed by tightening the lock ring. I also had the battery fly off and skid down the road once… Forgot to lock it! Everything well built though, it’s totally fine.

    Reply
  • October 12, 2019 at 3:12 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    8

    Ease of Installation

    0

    Efficiency

    2.5

    have a MTB with a BBS02 kit and having a blast with it. It has let me get back on bikes. (Retired and past the shape of riding without motor) Considering a Fat Tire build. Not sure what bike (maybe cheap from Walmart) and build from there. What is your take on rear hub vs mid drive for Fat Tire bike build? Would appreciate your input.

    Reply
    • October 12, 2019 at 7:18 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Lee,

      In my experience, I prefer a fat tire bike with a mid-drive. You can purchase a BBS02 motor shaft extension kit from PreciAlps in France. It’s possible Luna Cycles or California ebikes sell the modification kit.

      A hub motor would be a good enough option for a fat bike, but if you’re used to a BBS02, I would stick with that.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 5, 2019 at 9:56 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    Great article which gives me lots to think about. I have a Cube Hyde Team 2011 with a Shimano Alfine 8 speed hub, would it be suitable for the Bafang 48V 500 W. How difficult is it to change the power assist levels to make the power assist similar to the Bosch eco, tour and emtb and can you st it up for power assist only with no throttle function;
    Thanks,
    David

    Reply
    • October 5, 2019 at 5:50 pm
      Permalink

      Hi David,

      You shouldn’t have any issues with an Alifine 8 as long as you fit a gearshift sensor. You do not need to fit the throttle and it will not make any difference to the running of the motor.

      The best way to set the power to be more like the Bosch would be to get a USB Programming lead and download the free software and use the Hackers guide to programming the BBS02 found on the electricbike-blog.com.

      You can actually get the BBS02 running really smoothly, and delivering nice progressive power, by fine-tuning the settings using the software.

      It is always important to set the ‘start current’ on the pedal assist to less than 10% when using an IGH. I have installed a lot of BBS02 750w and BBSHD on to bikes with the ALfine 8, and Nexus 8 without any long-term issues.

      I hope this helps, and glad you like the article.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 3, 2019 at 10:11 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    That stops my head from aching. Will look into your suggestions.

    Thanks heaps,
    Jeff

    Reply
  • October 3, 2019 at 2:04 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,
    I have recently purchased a Polygon Entiat TR6 on which I would like to install a Bafang BBS02B 750W Mid Drive using a 48v 13s4p battery with Sansung 35E cells.
    BB is 73mm. Crank Set is Samox 32T. I am concerned about how little room I have in the area where it comes close to the chainstay. Think that is the correct term. Moving it out might mess up the chain line too much.
    Need help to confirm it will be OK before purchase.
    Thanks a lot
    Jeff.
    Australia.

    Reply
    • October 3, 2019 at 9:42 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Jeff,

      I’ve just had a look at the specs on the Entiat TR6, and personally I think it could be a bit of a tight fit. Looking at the bike from the rear, the chainstay comes out at quite an angle from the BB area. Even if you could fit a spacer between the motor and BB shell, you’re not going to have a lot of thread left on the motor shaft to fit the outer lockring.

      It’s a bit difficult to be certain without the bike being here in front of me, but taking into account the wider clearance needed for the 3″ tyres and the angle of the chainstay, I would have to say no. I’ve had issues with chainstay clearance on MTB’s with standard 2.2″ tyres.

      It might be worth having a look at the CYC X1 Pro, it’s still quite a new system (and expensive), and hasn’t been mass-produced yet. But Luna Cycles seem to like it. The other option would be a Cyclone system.

      If you need any more advice, let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • September 20, 2019 at 2:58 pm
    Permalink

    I have a GT Grade carbon drop handle gravel bike
    Do you think the bike is suitable for a conversion and if so what would you recommend
    I mainly ride country lanes in Herts & Bucks

    I could not find any comments on range

    Reply
    • September 20, 2019 at 4:03 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Mike,

      I have checked the spec on your bike, and it looks like it has a Shimano Hollowtech ll bottom bracket, so it should be compatible with the Bafang mid-drive motor. The main issue I have come across with carbon framed bikes in the past, is the area frame area around the bottom bracket. Some carbon road bikes have a beefed-up area surrounding the bottom bracket, which can make installation difficult or even impossible.

      The only way to be sure, would be to remove the crankset and bottom bracket and measure the thickness from the inside of the BB shell to the outside of the surrounding frame.

      Regarding battery range, this would depend on the kind of battery you fitted. A 48v 13ah battery would give you a potential range of anywhere between 25-50 miles depending on how much power you were using, weight, terrain etc.

      If you can take a photo of the bottom bracket area and send it to me at: cycletek@outlook.com, I should be able to let you know for sure.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • September 19, 2019 at 1:51 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony
    Thanks for coming back to me again. I think based on what you say I will find a UK supplier, it will cist a little more no doubt but it could prove significantly less in the long run should I experience a warrenty issue.
    I suspect other individuals reading your blog are also facing this same dilemma.
    Kind regards
    Roy

    Reply
    • September 20, 2019 at 8:27 am
      Permalink

      Hi Roy,
      It’s definitely a good idea, especially if you’re going to rely on your bike for regular transport. It might also be worth trying Francis at Electron cycles in Epsom. I know he specialises in high performance ebike kits like the Bafang BBSHD and CYC X1, but he may be able to help you with a BBS02. They also do a wide range of very high quality batteries, and they are incredibly knowledgeable regarding the Bafang motor.

      Let me know how you get on.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 5:25 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony
    My pulse x is now sold, so currently reviewing my intended purchases. May I ask, having read a number of forums re purchasing kits, there is strong theme regarding buying from a British company for potential warrenty issues, you mention using Aliexpress, have you ever had any issues with them or warrenty claims? Spending close to £1000 and with a Chinese company does raise some concerns. I have seen Eclipse bikes offer the same items albeit at a greater cost.
    Interested in your views
    Kind regards
    Roy

    Reply
    • September 19, 2019 at 11:20 am
      Permalink

      Hi Roy,

      Most of the reputable sellers on Aliexpress will honour warranties, but the main problem is time and cost. Most suppliers will require the buyer to pay for and arrange postage of the faulty part or motor back to China (which can be costly). They will usually post the replacement part back at their expense.

      I have experienced a couple of issues, where the part has never been returned or has somehow got ‘mysteriously been lost’ in the post. I have ended up having to foot the cost myself.

      Most of the decent suppliers on Aliexpress, who have a good reputation, will do their best to help. But the process can be painfully slow.

      I have purchased kits and batteries from Eclipse in the past without any issues, my only complaint is they can take a while to answer emails.

      The other option would be to purchase from eBay or Amazon UK, they both have a certain degree of buyer protection, and it is easier to get a refund if a problem can’t be resolved.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • September 12, 2019 at 1:20 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony
    Thanks for the tyre recommendations, I am hoping to sell the volt pulse x, before finally purchasing all that I have listed. I will add those tyre mind.
    Thanks again for your help and information.

    Reply
    • September 12, 2019 at 1:37 pm
      Permalink

      No worries Roy, if you need any further advice, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • September 11, 2019 at 6:01 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony
    Thanks for coming back to me, having viewed the video helped convince me it’s the way to go. Can I seek your advice a little more. I have viewed Aliexpress and am in the process of purchasing;
    BBS02B 48V/750W with a 48T drive sprocket as that is what my giant roam has fitted at present, (saves shortening chain)
    Hydrolic break sensors
    Bestbikes gear sensor
    DP-C18 Display
    48v 17.5ah (samsung 35c celled battery, from what I have read I should avoid 29E celled batteries) complete with battery charger.

    Is their anything else I need?

    I weigh 74kg and really want the kit for odd comuting and fun on dirt tracks. My home town is relatively flat but would like to travel with the bike so need to be prepared for more hilly terrain.

    Thanks in advance

    Reply
    • September 11, 2019 at 6:28 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Roy,

      It looks like you have ordered everything you need. Regarding chainring size, the 48t should be fine, as you live in a relatively flat area.

      The 35E Samsung cells are a big improvement on the older 29E cells. The DP-C18 sometimes comes configured with only 5 PAS levels which cannot be changed to 9. If this is a problem, I would go for the 850c display. Apart from that the DP-C18 is a really nice display unit.

      The only other thing I recommend is a good set of puncture resistant tyres – Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres are not only puncture resistant, but they are also rated for e-bike use. I have covered over 8k miles on Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres and never had a puncture! Well worth the extra £50 – £60 for a pair.

      Let me know how you get on, if you need any help or advice with the installation, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
    • January 27, 2021 at 8:08 am
      Permalink

      Value for Money

      10

      Ease of Installation

      10

      Efficiency

      10

      Hi Tony, thanks for your comprehensive review. I’m keen to get started on a BBSHD conversion but I’m concerned it might not be compatible with my bike. I’ve seen the other Cube comments and couldn’t see if my bike is compatible and was hoping you might know? I have a 2018 Cube Stereo 160SL https://www.cube.eu/en/2018/bikes/mountainbike/fullsuspension/stereo/cube-stereo-160-sl-275-metalnblue-2018/

      I think it has the Hollowtech 2 bottom bracket but not sure where to find this info.

      Do you think my bike will be compatible?

      Thanks very much,

      Mike

      Reply
      • January 27, 2021 at 11:56 am
        Permalink

        Hi Mike,

        I had a look on the Cube website link and I couldn’t find the bottom bracket type in the specification. When I zoomed in on the 360 degree image, I couldn’t see an external cup bearing which would indicate it uses a pressfit bottom bracket. Here is a link to an image of a Shimano XT bottom bracket (from the Shimano website). If the crankset and crank arm is flat against the frame, then I would say it’s definitely a pressfit BB. It would still be possible to do the conversion with a pressfit, but it depends on the type. It would need to be something like a PF30 and you would need a PF30 to BSA adaptor.

        If in doubt, take a measurement of the width of the bottom bracket shell (between the crank) it should be no more than 73mm wide. Let me know if you have any more questions.

        Cheers,
        Tony

        Reply
  • September 7, 2019 at 7:56 pm
    Permalink

    Hello
    I currently own a volt pulse x but would like to upgrade the fun level, and am considering fitting this unit to my giant roam, with 28 inch wheels. Will this fit? Your review has certainly got my interest as i was considering a rear hub conversion but no longer. I have hydraulic brakes so would install the recommended cut out switches if I can source them.

    Reply
    • September 8, 2019 at 9:01 am
      Permalink

      Hi Roy,

      I have installed the Bafang BBS02 and BBSHD on the Giant Roam. Here is a link to a YouTube video of one of the conversions. Both the conversions I did were straightforward and the motor was a good fit.

      If you need to fit the hydraulic brake cut-offs, they can be purchased from eBay or Amazon UK, here is a link to them on Amazon from a UK supplier.

      If you need any further advice, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 14, 2019 at 11:42 am
    Permalink

    Thanks Tony for the quick response , with this info this brand sounds like the one to go with
    Regards
    Mike

    Reply
    • August 14, 2019 at 1:45 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Mike,

      Glad to help, if you need any more info, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 13, 2019 at 3:41 pm
    Permalink

    Great review of this brand thanks !
    how are these motors in the snow and cold , is there a operating temp range . I live in ontario Canada and i ride in temps as low as -15-20 and am considering outfitting my foes mutz fatbike with one.
    thanks
    Mike

    Reply
    • August 13, 2019 at 7:18 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Mike,

      Thanks for your complement, glad you like the review!

      Regarding motor performance in extreme cold temperatures, the Bafang BBS02 / BBSHD seem to perform okay, I have sold kits in the past to customers in Norway and Finland and the feedback has been positive. The main issue will be that lithium battery packs do not perform so well at these temperatures and will work at a reduced percentage of their total energy capacity. As long as the battery is stored and charged at a comfortable temperature (around 18 degrees centigrade), you shouldn’t have too many problems (apart from a reduced range).

      The motor itself has a fairly good degree of resistance to moisture ingress, although you may want to strip the motor down and check it over at the end of each winter season.

      If you need any more info, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 13, 2019 at 10:54 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony

    Thanks for the great article, you certainly know your stuff.

    I am investigating installing a motor on a 2014 Merida Big Ninety-Nine XT Edition (Carbon frame). Do you know if it would fit? Would the Carbon frame be a problem?

    Thanks for your help

    Tim

    New Zealand

    Reply
    • August 13, 2019 at 12:07 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Tim,

      You may have problems with a carbon frame, depending on the thickness around the bottom bracket area. I have installed both the Bafang BBS02 and BBSHD onto Carbon bikes before without too much problem. The other thing I couldn’t find on the spec sheet for your bike was the bottom bracket type. Being a 2014 model it is probably a Shimano Hollowtech II or pressfit bottom bracket. If it is the latter then you would need to measure the width of the bottom bracket shell.

      If you can send a couple photos of the bottom bracket area (left, right and underside) to my email address: cycletek@outlook.com I will be able to have a better look.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 7, 2019 at 10:18 am
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    7.5

    Ease of Installation

    8

    Efficiency

    0

    Hi Tony,
    thanks for sharing your knowledge, it is really useful.
    One question from my side, the spec of the drive sais it is IP65. What is your experiecne using it in really MTB condistions, I mean in rain, crossing creeks, muds etc., or even on very fine dusted roads?

    regards,
    Arpad

    Reply
    • August 7, 2019 at 12:16 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Arpad,

      I’ve used a BBSHD in very wet and muddy off-road conditions without any issues, heavy rain and riding through puddles and shallow water. I believe that there is a fair degree of water resistance, although I have been told not to fully submerge the motor or use a pressure washer.

      I don’t think the BBS01 / BBS02 is quite as water resistant, I have had at least two reports of water ingress into the motor by customers using their bikes in wet weather off-road riding. One had an electrical failure and the other caused a bearing to prematurely fail.

      I hope this information helps.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 4, 2019 at 5:25 am
    Permalink

    Hey Tony, Great info on your website. Quick question, would any of the Bafang kits work on the following bikes:
    Trek 7.2 FX circa 2008
    Trek 2.3 circa 2009
    I wanted to start it out on 7.2 FX bike and eventually move it to the road bike.
    Thanks in advance and keep up the great work.
    John

    Reply
    • August 4, 2019 at 5:42 am
      Permalink

      Hi John,

      Thanks for you comment, glad you like the site.

      The Bafang mid-drive should fit either of your bikes without too much hassle. I converted a Trek FX hybrid not that long ago, and if my memory serves me correct it was a nice and straightforward conversion.

      If you need any more info, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 7:59 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks Tony, Much appreciated. We don’t really need the 9 levels of assist… we’re not likely to need that number, but winding down the assist power will be helpful. I will probably wind them all back when I see what they are set at. I have just ordered a programming cable from China so it will be a few weeks till I can modify the settings.
    I got the smallest front cog offered by Bafang with the kit (42 tooth?) and I suppose for general easy medium cruising/cycle trail use that will be fine. Is that right?
    Thanks again.
    Renton

    Reply
    • August 2, 2019 at 8:43 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Renton,

      The smallest chainring usually offered is a 44t, but some of the suppliers now offer smaller chainrings with the kits. A 42t / 44t will be fine for regular riding, but if you were going to be tackling lots of steep climbs then it would be worth getting a 36t Lekkie Bling Ring. They are high quality CNC machined chainrings made specifically for Bafang motors, and better still they are based in New Zealand!

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 7:49 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony

    I’ve just fitted a 750w 48v bafang to each of our two bikes. It was a bit of mission but went ok and the bikes go great.

    You said above:

    ‘You will be fine … as long as you fit a gearshift sensor and dial back the start current on the pedal assist (and throttle if you’re fitting one).’

    I’ve fitted the throttle but don’t anticipate using it. What I am particularly interested in is re dialing ‘back the start current’, as in my testing last night, even on assist 1, the power came on pretty strongly when starting from stationary. I wouldn’t find it a problem, but my wife may, so I was wondering if that start power could be reduced, so it doesn’t kick quite so hard. Also… I’m using the DPS18 and it only shows 5 levels of assist, yet you also talk of there being 9 levels, something I’ve seen elsewhere. Are these things which can be adjusted by programming the controller?

    All the best

    Renton Maclachlan
    New Zealand