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Bafang BBS01 250w Review

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In this Bafang BBS01 250w review, I will be going over the pros and cons of this popular mid-drive conversion kit – this is the only variant I can recommend for road legal use in the UK,  EU and Australia. I will be reviewing the more powerful variants later.

At the bottom of this post there are some useful links on where to buy the Bafang BBS01B 250w kit.

Bafang are currently the global leader in plug and play mid-drive electric bike conversion kits, and have been for a number of years. Earlier versions were plagued by reliability issues, and although this can still be an issue, the problem is not as bad as it was a couple of years ago.

Buy the Bafang BBS01B from Amazon

I have personally installed over a hundred of these kits on to various bikes, ranging from low-step commuter bikes through to full-suspension mountain bikes.

Bafang bbs01 250w mid drive motor diagram

The main criteria for installation is the size of the bike’s bottom bracket. It needs to be a standard 68mm-73mm wide bottom bracket with an inside diameter of approximately 33.5mm. It must be noted that these kits are not intended to be installed on bikes that use a pressed-fit bottom bracket, as the dimensions are not compatible with the motor unit. There can be a way around this if a special shim and mounting plate are machined by a professional engineer.

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If your bike has an eccentric bottom bracket as fitted to tandems and bike’s with internally geared hubs like the Shimano Nexus, installation is still possible, but may be problematic.

The motor comes as a kit with the following key components:

  • The motor unit with integrated controller
  • LCD Display
  • Wiring loom
  • Inner and outer lock-nuts
  • Chainring
  • Chainguard (BBS01 and BBS02)
  • Thumb throttle – I do not recommend fitting this, as it is unnecessary and will increase the risk of controller failure if used inappropriately.
  • Brake levers with cut-off sensors (only compatible with cable brakes)
  • Speed sensor and wheel magnet
  • A bag of various Allen bolts and screws

bafang bbs01b 36v 250w electric bike kit

Legal information

Please read my separate article on electric bike law here.

Installation

If you are looking for a nice easy conversion to do yourself, but you have little or no experience with bicycle mechanics or using tools, I would not recommend this kit. See my guide on how to install a Bafang BBS02  This also covers the BBS01 which is physically the same.  The installation will need to be carried out by someone who is fairly competent. Removing the bottom bracket can be a right pain, and you will require a lot of patience!

The Bafang BBS01B 36v 250w fitted to a HP Velotechnik Recumbent bike

Technical Data

These motors have an internal cadence sensor, and give assist based on pedalling cadence. The controller will reduce the power in any given power level based on pedalling rpm. This is called the keep current, and depending on the way your particular controller is programmed, this can reduce the power by up to 60%. The logic behind this is the higher the cadence, the less help you need, this is somewhat counter-intuitive as electric motors works best when spinning at a high rpm.

One great thing about these motors, is they can be programmed with a Bafang programming cable and software (which you can download for free here). I will be writing a separate post about programming the Bafang. PLEASE NOTE: Reprogramming the 250w motor to any higher than 15A and 15.5mph (25km/h) would make it illegal for road use in the UK / EU / AU.

The motor itself works through a series of gears, and drives the rear wheel directly through a single front chainring. The benefit of this is the motor is using the bike’s gear ratios for maximum efficiency and torque. The downside of this is you have to make sure you are in the right gear when hill climbing as excess load on the motor can cause controller failure.

The 250w motor is very quiet and smooth, and you have up to 9 levels of pedal assist to choose from.

Reliability

I have installed many BBS01B 250w Bafang motors and to date, and I haven’t had any issues reported – these seem to be confined to the more powerful variants. Having said that there are a number of things to consider.

  • Although I haven’t had any issues with the 250w, they can and do occur from time to time.
  • Controller failure is rare on this model nowadays, especially since Bafang upgraded the MOSFET’s in the controller.
  • You will need a Bafang lock-ring spanner – these motors do sometimes need to be re-tightened periodically.
  • The speed sensor can be easily knocked out of alignment with the wheel magnet – this will throw up an error code and pedal assist will stop working.
  • In my experience the C965 display is the most reliable but has limited functionality. The available colour displays a great but I have had the occasional fault with these in the past.
  • Increased wear and tear on the bike chain and gear components – this can be mitigated by fitting a Bafang gearshift sensor.

Riding a Bafang powered Electric Bike

bafang bbs01b 36v 250w fitted to a mountain bike

The 250w motor is very quiet and smooth, and you have up to 9 levels of pedal assist to choose from, so you really can fine tune the power output to suit your needs. When climbing step hills you will need to make sure you are in a low gear (as you would be in a car or on a motorcycle) this is especially important as trying to climb a hill in a high gear will put the motor under excess load and could overheat, causing controller failure.

The pedal assist is responsive, and works well, although on some of the older units, there was always a slight over-run noticeable when pedalling stopped. This was down to one of the controller programming parameters being set too high. I always reprogrammed the unit to stop this issue.

The main downside, in my opinion is the extra pedalling resistance this motor has when the power is on ‘0’ or the motor is switched off altogether. It is not too bad on the flat, but it is really noticeable when going up a slight gradient. This is the main reason, I tend to prefer small geared hub motors.

If your bike has a double or triple front chainset, then you will be sacrificing that for a single steel chainring. Bafang only offer a 44t, 46t and 48t option. This in my opinion is high gearing, especially if you are climbing lots of steep hills. There are however a couple of alternatives – you could fit a 104BCD chainring adaptor or buy one of the many aftermarket chainrings available.

If you want to fit the brake levers with cut-off sensors, then bare in mind these are only suitable for cable operated brakes. If your bike has hydraulic brakes, you may want to purchase hydraulic brake cut off sensors or completely new hydraulic brakes with the sensors already built in.

Conclusion

The Bafang mid drive motor is not for everyone. Installation can be challenging and the motor will need periodic maintenance. It is nonetheless an excellent option, and the end result will be a bike that looks more like a factory produced ebike.

bafang bbs01 250w fitted to a ladies mountain bike

For a 250w motor it produces a lot of torque, I have done a side by side hill climb comparison of the Bafang 250w vs a 1000w hub motor and the Bafang out performed the larger, more powerful hub motor. The large direct drive hub motor was only rated at 35Nm of torque compared to the Bafang’s 80Nm.

If you are comfortable with your ability to install it, and you have an appropriate donor bike, then as long as you can live with some of the compromises, this is still one of the best electric bike kits available.

Buy the Bafang BBS01B 250w from trusted vendors✅

The Bafang BBS01B can be purchased from the links below with shipping to most regions including the EU, UK, US and Canada.
Buy from Aliexpress (mulitple shipping options
Buy from Amazon (various countries)
Buy from eBay
👉Compare Bafang BBS01B 250w prices (UK visitors only)

More trusted vendors below👇


Thanks for reading, if you have any questions please leave a comment below or sign up to our new forum which has a dedicated Bafang mid-drive section.

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Bafang BBS01B 250w Mid Drive

7.3

Value for Money

8.0/10

Ease of Installation

6.0/10

Reliability

8.0/10

Pros

  • Very efficient
  • Excellent performance
  • Fits most bikes

Cons

  • Can be difficult to install for the inexperienced
  • Requires regular maintenance
  • Some potential long term reliability issues

Tony

Passionate E-Bike advocate and enthusiast. 5 years experience converting bikes for customers primarily using Bafang and Tongsheng electric bike motors.

112 thoughts on “Bafang BBS01 250w Review

  • September 11, 2021 at 7:17 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Tony, I recently bought a Bafang 250W, 36V, 36v battery, 17.4 ah sensors on chamulce and gear shift sensor. When the engine stops working and starts under load, it makes a short screech. The engine does not heat up, I select the appropriate gears for the terrain, apart from these squeals, the engine seems to be working properly.

    Reply
    • September 11, 2021 at 8:58 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Marek,

      It’s not an issue I’ve come across before, but I would definitely keep an eye on it. Is it installed on a mountain bike? I have found on some MTB installations you need to use a 2.5mm spacer on the drive side as the housing can be too tight against the chainstay (when the lockring is fully tightened). This may account for the noise, but if not I would recommend contacting the supplier to see if they can offer a solution.

      Let me know how it goes.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 9, 2021 at 7:29 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    10

    Ease of Installation

    10

    Reliability

    9

    Tony

    Thanks for a great website and review, this actually helped me decide to fit a Bafang mid-crank kit to an old 1990’s racing bike I have. I’d had some ebike conversion experience by fitting a front hub motor to a tandem but fancied trying a mid-crank for a different challenge. The installation was pretty straightforward with the correct tools which apart from the essential Bafang spanner I’d pretty much accumulated over the years. I was wondering with your huge experience of conversions whether you have a view on where to source a decent quality 36v battery maybe around the 14AH area?. My current experience with batteries is 1)The original tandem battery of claimed 13AH new. This is well past its best as its five years old but I’m currently using it on the racer conversion but its pretty weak to be fair. 2) Probably a couple of years ago I bought a replacement 36v battery from ‘an auction site’ which claimed to be 18AH and contain LG cells. However I’m firmly convinced it never had anything like this capacity and now I doubt if it holds 8AH to be honest (have crudely tested it with a power plug that records energy usage).
    I bought the mid-crank kit from Eclipse bikes and their customer service was excellent so I’m tempted to buy a battery from them. They sell batteries manufactured by EM3ev which apparently use Panasonic cells, I was wondering if you have any experience of these?. The cost of a 36v 14.5AH battery is about £320 which would be OK if the quality was good. Reviews of this manufacturer are not easy to come by. Also readily available online are batteries from a company called Yose but these are cheap enough to raise a few concerns.
    Anyway I love the racer conversion, so pleased I went for it. The tandems simple hub motor (bought elsewhere) has now done 4500 miles which I think is brilliant. I did have to have a new wheel built around the motor after about 300 miles, the motor is great but the wheel quality was dire!.

    All the best and many thanks

    Richard

    Reply
    • August 9, 2021 at 8:21 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Richard,

      EM3ev have a very good reputation and an ultra-modern production facility, the company is run by a British guy in China. I’d have no qualms buying from Eclipse – I’ve had a few batteries off them over the years and never had any problems.

      It’s also worth having a chat with Jimmy at ebikebatteries.co.uk – he custom-builds batteries from scratch. They’re generally more expensive but their built to a very high standard also using Panasonic NCR18650GA cells.

      I hope this helps.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • August 10, 2021 at 6:08 pm
        Permalink

        Value for Money

        10

        Ease of Installation

        10

        Reliability

        9

        Tony, many thanks for the quick reply. Very unselfish of you to put the time in sharing knowledge in this way. I think I will swerve towards the EM3ev battery. In time I intend to replace both the batteries I have and I believe the EM3ev can be used successfully in parallel (well so the info suggests) which will add another option. The batteries on ebikebatteries site really look top end, I’d really like to splash out on one of the higher capacity ones but the cost as you mentioned is a bit higher. Thanks again!

        Reply
  • June 22, 2021 at 7:21 pm
    Permalink

    PHEW what a web site truly awesome

    Here I am trying hard to make a sensible decision on converting my what must be my 20+ year old Cannodale Mountain bike to electric power

    Use is going to be Sunday or sunny day rides probably the longest ones are going to be 20 miles or less

    Also,I am going to convert my partners bike as well

    Options to me seem like the Tongsheng tsdz2 250w 36v mid drive and the Bafang BBS01 and BBS02 both either 36V or 48V

    I am in the UK sunny Scotland with a few hills on our normal ride out routes we are both in our 70’s so need some assistance to get up the hills doubly so as my partner will get off and push rather than drop the gears and keep on peddling.

    BIKES are this very old Cannondale MTB with no suspension and a triple front crank with oval cranks with a 5 speed rear cassette. Brakes on the Cannondale are quite different from anything I have ever seen before having the cable pulling on a curved wedge in between two rotating wheels that move outwards as the wedge moves upwards forcing out the top of the brake levers which then pivots and forces the brake shoes on the bottom end of this lever onto the rims

    My partners bike is slightly more recent being a Claud Butler MTB but also has a triple front crank but an 8 speed rear cassette more normal old style brakes and front suspension

    So the question is should we bin (sell) both of the bikes and get something more modern with disc brakes and suspension at both ends

    Also, of course no matter what bikes we eventually have what do you think the sensible option for powering our bikes should be. We are not speed freaks and just want some good assistance. I understand that I can probably tune the Bafang ones to make the assistance smooth and user friendly but I am wondering of torque sensing is a more sensible route to go to power our bikes I am not thinking of using a throttle nor brake cut off levers just having a nice sensible simple rider assistance.

    OF course maybe we should consider buying an electric bike to make things simpler.

    I am a RR engineer and electrical and electronics engineer, so I don’t see the conversion as something beyond me. Also my son-in-law is a keen cyclist as is my eldest son, so there is available some good knowledgeable cycling/biking assistance if I should need that

    Reply
    • June 23, 2021 at 11:30 am
      Permalink

      Hi David,

      There’s absolutely nothing wrong with converting older bikes especially if they’re in decent, serviceable condition. In my experience older bikes are usually easier to convert. I have converted old Cannondale MTB’s from the 90’s before without any issues. The Claud Butler should also be straightforward.

      Regarding the brakes I’m having trouble finding them online, are they the old Shimano XTR v-brake? If so I would leave them in situ as they should work very well. If you wanted to upgrade your brakes to modern v-brakes I find the latest Shimano Deore rims brakes work very well (I use these on my touring bike).

      Both the Tongsheng and Bafang would be good options, I would rather use one of the higher voltage (48v) and higher power versions but with the peak current limited – this would mean the same power can be achieved using lower current and would help the motor to run cooler and be more efficient. Unfortunately there are legal implications for anything above 250w.

      If I had to choose between the Bafang and Tongsheng my preference would be the Tongsheng as the pedal assist is much more natural and intuitive. The Bafang has more of an on/off feel to it.

      Both the Tongsheng and Bafang can suffer from reliability issues and it’s really luck of the draw if you get a good or bad one. I’ve personally been very lucky with these motors and have covered quite a few miles on both without problems.

      I now ride a factory built e-bike – Vitus Mach E, and I’m very impressed with it. It has been totally reliable, it’s smooth, quiet and I can get nearly 100 miles out of a charge using eco mode. If I was faced with the choice now of buy a conversion kit or factory e-bike I would go with the latter, although you don’t have the customisation options and if they eventually do go wrong (outside of warranty) it can cost a packet.

      I hope this information helps, if you have any more questions please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 12, 2021 at 2:18 pm
    Permalink

    Hi,
    Thank you for your information.
    you report having had multiple color displays: “Some of the color displays can be unreliable – I find the black and white C965 display to be the best, I have had several issues with the color display.”
    What are the references of the screens you had problems with?
    what were the problems?

    I am looking for a “reliable” display providing a USB socket, with 9 levels of assistance:
    https://bafang-e.com/en/products/displays/
    DP C27X
    DP C25X
    DP C24X
    DP C23X
    DP C181
    DP C18
    DP C10 / C171
    DP E12 (6 levels of assistance)
    850c
    P850C
    P860C
    DPC18 (5 levels of assistance)
    do you have any advice on these references?

    I am only interested in the authorized version Bafang BBS01 36V 250W 25Km / h.
    but I would like to put the biggest battery possible to have as much autonomy as possible (it climbs around my home and I prefer that the bike remains a pleasure).
    I found these batteries with Samsung cells:
    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005001894703932.html
    https://fr.aliexpress.com/item/1005001894703932.html
    Is 36V 30AH 1500W (5A) battery compatible with Bafang BBS01 36V 250W built-in controller?
    if not, what is the largest compatible battery on the list?
    I understand that the (5A) version will accept a faster charge than the (2A)?
    this without affecting the battery life?

    I specify that I will not make any modification.

    Thank you
    Xavier

    Reply
    • June 13, 2021 at 10:38 am
      Permalink

      Hi Xavier,

      The displays on your list I’ve had issues with are the P850c and DPC18, although these have been isolated incidents and I haven’t had any issues since. The C965 is very basic but does seem reliable (and cheap to replace if it fails). If I had to recommend a display, I would go with the P850c or P860c – both displays are very similar in functionality.

      Regarding battery, the 36v 30Ah will give you a massive potential range and will be compatible with the BBS01B – the Ah (amp hour)rating refers to the energy capacity (36v x 30A = 1500 watt hours total capacity), it doesn’t matter if the continuous discharge rate is 30A or 40A – the motor controller will only draw its maximum current at any given time (e.g. 15A for the BBS01B 250w).

      It is fine to charge a 30Ah battery at 5A – faster charging can have a negative effect on lower energy capacity batteries but anything over 20Ah is okay to charge at the higher current.

      I hope this info helps if you need any more advice, let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • May 18, 2021 at 5:16 pm
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    Hi Tony have you had any dealings with boardman Fazua ebike ,if you look at the web site you can tailor assistance to your needs ,i am not very fit so i would need little effort but plenty of power ,what would be best settings for me .Lawrence

    Reply
    • May 18, 2021 at 9:10 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Lawrence,

      Yes I’ve ridden the HYB and ADV, both bikes are really good value for money. The Fazua motor is great and you can tune the power delivery using their customizer. For maximum assist I would set the ‘performance’ parameter and ramp-up to ‘reactive’ this will give you the most responsive and useful boost in ‘rocket’ mode. This will be fine if you’re only covering shorter distances as you will deplete the battery much quicker with these settings. If you require assist over greater distances then you’d need to get a range extender battery which will effectively double your range. I did have a look on their website and it’s out of stock at the moment.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • May 20, 2021 at 9:15 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony thanks for your prompt reply ,i will give that a go ,when the weather improves ,you may remember you helped me with a Bafang ,Top Man Cheers Lawrence

        Reply
  • March 23, 2021 at 12:27 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    I’m considering converting my MTB to an electric bike using the Bafang BBS01B or BBS02B. You mentioned in the pros/cons section of your review that these motors need regular maintenance. Can you explain what kind of regular maintenance is needed then.

    BTW great website and advice!

    Thanks much,

    Freddy

    Reply
    • March 23, 2021 at 8:53 am
      Permalink

      Hi Freddy,

      Generally speaking the Bafang motor itself is relatively low maintenance, however you will need to accept that these motors don’t have the long term reliability of factory e-bike motors like the Bosch or Shimano Steps. In my experience you get good and bad motors, it’s luck of the draw. I have customers who’ve put 4-5k miles on these motors without a single issue and I’ve had others that pack up after 100 miles.

      The extra maintenance will involve reduced service life of chain, derailleur, cassette – this is due to the extra power being put through the drivetrain and the offset chain line. It’s always worth cleaning this regularly (degreasing and chain lube). Inside the motor the primary nylon gear will wear over time and the bearings in the axle can also need replacing after a lot of miles. Another component that can wear out is the sprag clutch which is a ‘one way’ bearing. As far as electrics are concerned, controller failure is not uncommon, and other things like hall sensors (inside motor) and pedal assist circuit. You may also need to tighten the motor lockring from time to time, although there are stabiliser bars available separately.

      Thankfully there is a wealth of information online regarding serving and repairing the Bafang, and there are a lot of companies who sell all the spare parts you will ever need. You need to be a bit of an enthusiast and tinkerer to use a Bafang long-term, or it would help if you have a local bike shop that doesn’t mind doing the servicing.

      I hope this info helps, if you have any more questions please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • December 25, 2020 at 3:17 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    Thanks for your very helpful review.
    I am thinking of getting a BBS01B to convert my current bike to electric as it is the Granite 3.0 which has through-axles front and rear ruling out hub motors.
    I am quite fit but planning to use it for commuting to work in sometimes 30°C heat (Adelaide) without arriving hot and sweaty. I see your repeated advice to go low on the chainring, not more than 46T, to prolong the life of the motor, but I have a 50T (double) chainring on currently and I do occasionally use top gear (11T rear) so I’m concerned I will be limiting my top speed if I step down at the front and was looking at the 52T bling ring.

    How major a concern is it to use the BBS01B with a larger chainring?
    The rear cassette has a 34T lowest gear.
    I will not be letting the motor do all the work on hills I may encounter..

    Thanks again for the article and any advice you can offer.

    Reply
    • December 26, 2020 at 11:45 am
      Permalink

      Hi Rob,

      I don’t see there being any problems with a 52t chainring as long as you keep your pedalling cadence in the upper ranges on the climbs – I would say 70rpm and above would be ideal. The main problems seem to occur when riders put the motor under load by using a higher gear and lower pedalling speed on steep climbs, it doesn’t seem to be too much of a problem on moderate hills.

      I hope this helps, if you have any more questions, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • November 29, 2020 at 4:03 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony
    Thank you for your most informative reviews and comments. You are doing the biking fraternity a great service by your dedication! My best friend (also in his mid 70s) knows more on this subject than me and says I really ought to take the Bafung mid drive option. Your reviews seem to back him up, especially for my ageing knees. He has fitted two or three of these and has agreed to help me. I was going to get the kit on Ebay via an outfit called Cyclemilers. I clicked on your affiliate link for Ebay but it came up with ‘page not found’. I can get to the right website from there but don’t want you to miss your little payback. Will you get it anyway once I have clicked your link? My bike is a Halfords Carrera Subway very standard hybrid mens’ bike with 27 1/2 wheels. Can you advise me on chainwheel size? I would appreciate any other comments you might have.

    Regards Robert

    Reply
    • November 29, 2020 at 6:23 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Robert,

      Thank you for your positive comments, much appreciated. Your Carrera Subway should be a fairly straightforward conversion. I’ve converted a whole range of Carrera bikes in the past (using the Bafang) and they are generally easy to convert. The only problem I have come across is the bottom brackets can sometimes be a pain to remove.

      Cyclemillers seems to be a decent enough vendor. I haven’t personally purchased from them, but their feedback looks good enough, plus you have the eBay / PayPal buyer protection to fall back on. Here is the link to their eBay page.

      As far as chainring size is concerned, it depends on how hilly the terrain is where you live. If it’s fairly undulating then a 44t or 46t will be fine. If you live in an area that has lots of very steep hills, then ideally you would want to go lower – possible a 36t Lekkie Bling ring which are available from Brighton e-bikes.

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • November 15, 2020 at 4:17 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    7

    Ease of Installation

    8.5

    Reliability

    0

    Hi, great review and website, thank you. I’ve just fitted a BBS01B 250W and taken it for a first ride. Really pleased. However I find when pushing the thumb control the motor offers more support and certainly powers above 15mph. I’ve noticed the power on the dashboard goes up towards 500W too during those times. What is happening here please and is it illegal in UK? Many thanks

    Reply
    • November 15, 2020 at 9:55 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Mark,

      Most road legal 250w e-bikes are allowed to produce more power while under load for a short period as long as the continuous power rating doesn’t exceed 250w. The BBS01B has a 15A controller, so will peak power will be over 500w. Depending on how the motor firmware is configured, the thumb throttle will provide maximum assist up to peak power in the highest level. From a legal standpoint it should cut-off at 15.5mph, although the law does allow a ‘buffer zone’ of a couple of mph. If the throttle is providing assist way beyond the 15.5mph legal limit, you will need to get a USB programming lead and download the free software. You will need to pair your laptop and motor and configure the ‘throttle setting’ speed limit to 25km/h.

      I hope this helps, if you need any more info, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • November 6, 2020 at 10:08 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony I have fitted a bafang 36v 250watt mid drive ,i have read that i need to use low gears to keep the motor spinning fast ,but going up a gradient yesterday ,by mistake i was in too high a gear and pressed level 3 assist ,and by pedalling slower got more assist ,is this correct .Lawrence

    Reply
    • November 6, 2020 at 10:55 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Lawrence,

      That sounds about right for a standard BBS01. The motor is configured (out of the box) to produce more assist at a slower pedalling cadence. Usually at higher cadences the assist tapers off, which is counter-intuitive. The main problem pedalling at slower cadences in higher gears when climbing steep hills, is the load put on the motor. This can potentially lead to overheating and possible controller failure. I usually re-configure the controller using the free software and USB lead. The ‘keep current’ is usually set to 25 on the BBS01, which means the total current in amps is reduced by up to 75% as pedalling rpm increases. Here is a link to a good programming guide. Although it is specifically aimed at the BBS02, most of the parameters apply to the BBS01, apart from the max current – this should never be set to more than 18A on a BBS01B. You can configure the motor using these settings so that it produces more assistance at a much higher pedalling rpm, which will enable you to stay in a lower gear on climbs.

      If you need any more info, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • November 7, 2020 at 6:06 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony Thanks for your rapid reply i didnt know you were live ,i bought this unit 2weeks ago from a bike company in exeter who have live chat i asked the same question and the reply was to increase the maximum assistance speed .is that the same as what you say ,do i need the usb lead which i have seen for sale at £18.00 to do this cheers Lawrence

        Reply
        • November 7, 2020 at 6:13 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Lawrence,

          Yes, you will need the USB lead and there should be a link to download the software (for Windows PC) in the article. Here is a direct link to the software download page. If you’re in Devon or Cornwall, I’m not too far from Plymouth.

          Cheers,
          Tony

          Reply
          • November 8, 2020 at 12:06 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Tony If i get a lead what is it i need to change ? Lawrence

          • November 8, 2020 at 2:50 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Lawrence,

            There’s quite a few things you can change to improve the performance and assist on the BBS01. On the ‘Basic’ settings page you can change ‘Limited current (A)’ to 18, I think the maximum you can go to is 20, but I wouldn’t advise it. This increases the peak Amps the controller will draw from the battery, thus increasing the peak power output slightly. On the Assist 0-9 (‘Limit current(%)’ column), I would leave 0 at 0, and then do 1-9 in 10% increments starting at 20% for assist level 1 and finishing at 100% for level 9. The next column ‘Limit spd(%)’ causes the controller to gently lower the current to maintain motor rpm when a certain percentage of the speed limit is hit. Speed limiting is done based on motor RPM not actual road speed. I usually set this to 100% on 1-9. The ‘Wheel diameter’ setting is your wheel size in inches. A 700c should be 28″ or a 29er would be 29″, 650b would be 27.5″.

            On the next page ‘Pedal assist’ I would reduce ‘start current(%)’ to 10, ‘Time of stop’ to 10 and ‘keep current’ to 75. If you’re using a throttle I would recommend changing the ‘start current’ in the next page ‘Throttle settings’ to 10 and mode to ‘current’ (if it’s set to ‘speed’).

            If you currently have your display set to 3 power levels then 1 will be 20% of peak power, 2 will be 60% and 3 would be 100%. If you want to be able to fine-tune your e-assist more, I would change the settings (in the display) to either 5 or 9 levels of assist.

            I’ve used the above settings on loads of BBS01B 250w motors without any problems, you will find the pedal assist smoother on the uptake, but it should feel more powerful as the assist increases, and the reduction in assist when pedalling cadence increases won’t be as severe. Always remember to take screenshots of the original settings, just in case you need to change them back again. I have heard reports of a batch of the latest BBS01B controllers not being able to be programmed, I haven’t come across any yet so hopefully yours won’t be one of them.

            Please let me know how you get on.

            Cheers,
            Tony

          • November 11, 2020 at 3:43 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Tony i have downloaded the bafang tool with the link you gave me and winzip areasking me to buy licence is this normal ? Lawrence

          • November 11, 2020 at 7:52 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Lawrence,

            You shouldn’t need to buy a licence for Winzip, there is a free trial version available. Depending on what version of Windows you have installed you should have a pre-installed program called Windows Compressed Folders, which should enable you to unzip the files.

            Regards,
            Tony

          • November 12, 2020 at 6:46 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Tony I used the free trial on winzip to open file I have set amps to 18 ,three assist levels 20/60/100% so now I have the e bike performing how wanted .thanks for all your help cheers Lawrence

          • November 12, 2020 at 8:41 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Lawrence,

            You’re welcome, glad you’ve got it sorted.

            Cheers,
            Tony

          • November 14, 2020 at 7:17 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Tony I thought i had sorted this ,i set assist to 20%60%100% 3 levels but level one seems too powerful two is less powerful than one and three is more than two ,I have reduced one to 5% and increased two to 80% but makes no difference ,I can keep it like that but one is still too powerfull ,any ideas ? Lawrence

          • November 15, 2020 at 12:12 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Lawrence,

            Can you email me a screenshot of your pedal assist settings to cycletek@outlook.com. I’ll have a look and see where the problem is.

            Cheers,
            Tony

    • January 11, 2021 at 10:08 am
      Permalink

      Value for Money

      8

      Ease of Installation

      10

      Reliability

      10

      Be careful fitting a 250w motor to your bike,unless the law has changed recently here in australia,your bike will become a “pedelic “this means it will be illegal to ride on the road because it won’t have compliance stickers on the frame.(manufacturers name,watts,cutout speed ect).the compliance is on the whole bike not just the motor, in other words you can not legaly make a pedelic your self for road use, However a 200w (electric powered bike) is a different story, you can make your own not needing eu compliance………..some one correct me if I’m wrong??

      Reply
      • March 1, 2021 at 12:17 am
        Permalink

        Riding an unregistered vehicle is not a trivial matter in NSW

        From NSW RMS website:
        Vehicle standards information
        PUBLISHED 8 DECEMBER 2014 | REV. 4
        27
        Supersedes VSI No. 27 | Rev. 3 | 12 August 2014

        The vehicle must be certified by the manufacturer, and labelled as complying with EN 15194. The label must include the manufacturer’s name, the motor’s cut-off speed in km/h and its continuous rated power in watts.

        Reply
      • May 16, 2021 at 1:45 pm
        Permalink

        VicRoads alerted me to a change in the Australian Design Rules earlier this year which scraps the need to conform to EN15194 (standard which compliance stickers are marked to abide by), however, the basic rules for a pedalec would still apply, such as:

        -Motor progressively reduces assistance as the bicycle’s speed increases.
        -Motor cuts off at 25km/h or when the rider stops pedalling.
        -Has a 250 watts continous output for the motor.
        -Pedal assist only. No throttle.

        However, VicRoads haven’t updated their webpage yet to reflect this change. However, the NSW governement has at https://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/stayingsafe/bicycle-riders/petrol-powered-bicycles.html

        This may pave the way for DIY ebikes as long as they comply with the above requirements. Not sure if a BBS01 have the 25km/h cutoff and progressive reduction programmed into it though.

        Reply
  • October 21, 2020 at 4:30 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    9.5

    Ease of Installation

    10

    Reliability

    10

    Hi Tony and thanks for your great job with this site.
    I have a question for you. In april 2020 I mounted a Bafang motor MM G340 250 13 – 250W – on my Giant mountain bike. All is good but when I bought a USB cable for improve my motor with new parameters by programmation I had the surprise that my motor can’t be programmed.
    After connecting cable to my motor (I saw some tutorials and I think I do the correct steps) and after reading the motor parameters with the software the data read are all wrong and cannot be changed with read/save command.
    Someone in the internet says that Bafang has built some new motors in 2020 with controllers that cannot be programmed. My controller serie is CR R209.350.SN.U.5.0.
    I would like to improve my motor somehow. What can I do? Can You help me?
    Thank you and Greetings from Italy.
    Daniele

    Reply
    • October 21, 2020 at 7:11 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Daniele,

      This isn’t a problem I have come across before. I reprogrammed a new Bafang BBS01B only last week without any problems. I have done a bit of research and I Googled your controller serial number and did come across a report of a batch of controllers that can’t be reprogrammed. It may be the same article – it is on pedelecfroum.de. It may be worth contacting your supplier to see if they can help you out. On the forum, the guy had his supplier send out a replacement controller (that could be programmed).

      Sorry I couldn’t be of more help. Please let me know if you have any luck with your supplier.

      Kind regards,
      Tony

      Reply
      • October 22, 2020 at 2:16 pm
        Permalink

        Thank you Tony. I read the same article on pedelecforum.de.
        Now I will contact my supplier and hope to find a new programmable controller.
        Kind regards
        Daniele

        Reply
        • October 22, 2020 at 7:26 pm
          Permalink

          You’re welcome.

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
  • August 16, 2020 at 8:35 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    I came across your website and your reviews. Truly excellent and really useful! Please may i ask you a few questions?

    I am interested in an electric conversion for a Giant Roam 2, currently 27 gears, hydraulic brakes. One is a 2014 model and one is a 2017 model. I bought both of them through Cycle To Work, but am now retired. I have really got into bike rides, mainly on cycle paths, bridleways or quieter roads, so a Hybrid bike is ideal. However, owning two of them, I am now looking at an e-bike conversion to one of them to assist on hill climbing and to facilitate longer bike rides. (I live in Surrey and we have lots of hills)! My thinking is electric for help up those hills and to facilitate much longer bike rides from home.

    Having done quite a bit of reading on the subject, I believe that the Giant Roam 2 is a suitable bike for a Mid-Crank Kit, and I have the following questions:

    I am looking at a 250W Bafang BBS1, but I have seen a 500W Bafang 8Fun advertised. Is that legal in the UK? Also, what is the difference between the BBS01 and the BBS01B please?

    Do all of the above kits come as standard with PAS and what would be your recommendation on chain ring size, given my details please? (The Giant Roam 2 has 48T/36T/26T front cogs and whilst I want to be able to physically pull away under pedal power, I also do not want to loose any top speed performance in top gear.

    I do not have the skills or tools to fit myself, so i will need to get it professionally fitted. Some of the websites offering an “all in service” do not seem to offer any choice on display unit options. One is only offerring the Bafang C961, but this is not even listed by most, as they seem to have a C965. Personally, I am tending towards a P850C. Oh, and I am already looking into the USB programming cable option – good shout!

    Whilst noting your personal preference against a throttle cable, I have decided that i would want this. Is it included as standard on all kits?

    My Giant Roam has hydraulic brakes, which I need to retain. Therefore, will I need separate hydraulic brake cut-off sensors and how would this work? Similarly, would I need a gear shift sensor, or is that included as standard? I am guessing that if I stop peddling during every change up or down that it would have the same effect as a gear shift sensor, but i do like the idea of it.

    Finally, what are my best battery options? I am leaning towards a rear-rack battery, as I want to maintain my water bottle in the middle of my frame. I see that more powerful batteries are very expensive, so would I be better to have two less powerful ones and carry the spare one with me in my backpack? I am assuming that if I specify a rear rack battery, that the rack itself is easy enough for any fitter / dealer to source?

    Given the above, please can you offer me your opinion / any advice?

    Cheers,
    Ian

    Reply
    • August 17, 2020 at 10:33 am
      Permalink

      Hi Ian,

      The Giant Roam is a suitable donor bike, I’ve converted quite a few in the past and they are usually very straightforward to convert.

      The BBS02B 500w is not road legal in the UK and would be classified as a motorised vehicle – even though it is externally indistinguishable from the 250w (apart from the stamp on the underside of the motor). The BBS01 is the first generation and was released way back in 2014/15 as far as I’m aware this motor hasn’t been available for years. The BBS01B has upgraded MOSFET’s in the controller and the latest models have an extra gear sensor lead and a lead for lights.

      Brake cut-off sensors are only really necessary if you’re going to fit the throttle, I used a Bafang for about a year and never had any cut-off sensors fitted and it never caused any problems. The on/off button is easily accessible. If you wanted to fit them there are a few suppliers on eBay and Amazon who sell the complete Shimano or Tektro hydraulic brake set with built-in sensors.

      The gearshift sensor will definitely make shifting under load a lot smoother and reduce unnecessary wear and tear on the gear components and chain.

      For a decent range you will be looking at 36v 17.5Ah at the least – this will give a range of between 50-80 miles depending on how much assist you use. There are higher capacities available up to around 21Ah. Most of these batteries come with a ‘double decker’ rack so you can still fit panniers and top-bag if required.

      If you need someone to supply and fit everything, Alex at Besbike.co.uk is in Greenwich and has a good reputation, he also stocks most of the parts required. There is also Francis at electroncycles.co.uk in Epsom – he specialises in high-performance e-bike conversions, but has a lot of experience with Bafang, so he could probably help you out.

      I hope this helps, if you need any more advice please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • August 18, 2020 at 9:10 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,

        Your reply was most helpful. Thank you.

        Ian

        Reply
  • July 11, 2020 at 7:05 pm
    Permalink

    Hi

    I have a 20 year old Canondale Silk Path 700 whichI would like to fit a motor to. I am in the UK so max 250W. The bottom bracket is Shimano LP-27 68 x110mm so I assume this would work with a Bafang? Ifit would, what would be a good model?

    Reply
    • July 11, 2020 at 9:55 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Robert,

      I’ve just checked the specification on your Cannondale, and the Bafang BBS01B 250w should be a good fit. I have fitted the Bafang to a few older Cannondale’s including a Jekyll full suspension MTB and an older Bad Boy Lefty, and they were both straightforward conversions.

      If you have any more questions, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • July 11, 2020 at 6:46 am
    Permalink

    Hi, I’m thinking of a 250W Bafang mid mounted. I have a 48v 17ah battery. Would that work without damaging the motor/controller. Would it be faster and go further than a 36v battery.
    Much thanks for a speedy reply.

    Kind regards
    Rob

    Reply
    • July 11, 2020 at 8:38 am
      Permalink

      Hi Rob,

      You wouldn’t be able to use a 48v battery with the Bafang BBS01B 250w as this uses a 36v-specific controller. You could uses a BBS02B 500w 48v motor and limit the power to 250w and speed to 15.5mph using the available software and USB lead, but from a legal standpoint it would still be a 500w motor. As far as I know the ‘B’ model controllers are not interchangeable (between BBS01B and BBS02B) and even if you could change them the motor would run at a higher RPM than it’s designed for and prematurely fail.

      If you have any more questions, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • May 23, 2020 at 8:35 pm
    Permalink

    Value for Money

    9

    Ease of Installation

    2

    Reliability

    9

    Hi
    It is great to find a site that can answer questions about e-bike conversions.
    I have a 26″ high quality touring bike that I had custom built by Thorn in the UK more than 10 years ago. Among other things, it has a Rohloff Speedhub 500/14 gear system fitted. Unfortunately (for me) the roads are rather hilly where I live (in Australia) and I have found the bike too exhausting to use, even with the 14 gears (especially in warmer months). So it has gathered a lot of dust. However, I am now considering an e-bike conversion, mainly to allow me to get up those hills without wiping myself out in the process.
    From what I can see, the Bafang 250w mid-drive is the sort of solution I might need. However I am unsure on a few points that I hoped you might be able to clarify for me:
    1) Is this motor compatible with the Rohloff in-hub gear system that I have?
    2) What size chainring would I need – as I said, I am more interested in hill climbing ability on normal roads than flat-line speed. (the bike currently has a 40T ring)
    3) Would I need to get something like a Leckie Bling Ring?
    4) Is there any other accessory needed to protect the chain from excess tension, or is that mainly a problem for the higher powered motors only?
    5) I have good quality caliper (cable) brakes on the bike. Would these be OK for this sort of lower powered motor?

    Thanks Nigel

    Reply
    • May 23, 2020 at 10:35 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Nigel,

      I know Thorn bikes well, they’re about 100 miles up the road from me! You shouldn’t have any problems fitting the Bafang motor, I’m not sure if the bike you have has an eccentric bottom bracket. If it does have an eccentric BB (the modern type, not the one with pinch bolts on the underside) you will be fine, as I have fitted the Bafang on various bikes with eccentric BB’s in the past.

      Regarding gearing, I would go with a 36t Lekkie Bling Ring. It will keep the gearing nice and low and help the motor to spin faster and be more efficient (and keep the temperature down on long climbs).

      You could fit a gearshift sensor – this mounts in-line on the shifter cable and will momentarily cut power when shifting. The Rohloff is incredibly robust and should cope with the BBS01 250w just fine. I’ve fitted a 1000w Bafang to a bike with a Shimano Alfine 8 in the past and that’s still going.

      Any good quality cable brake will be more than adequate, I would imagine you have Shimano XT or similar v-brakes on your bike which are excellent when adjusted correctly.

      Let me know if you have any more questions.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • May 24, 2020 at 6:49 am
        Permalink

        Hi Tony

        Thanks for your quick response.

        I just had a look under the frame, where the pedal crank goes through it, and there are 2 protrusions there, each of which has some sort of screw with a knurled finger turning wheel/knob hanging underneath. Are these what you describe as “pinch bolts”, and, if so, does that mean I have a problem? The whole shape of the base of the pole is a symmetric cylinder surrounding the pedal crank shaft, if you get my meaning, with those two bolts poking out from the bottom of the cylinder.

        I was going to get the gearshift sensor and the 36T Bling Ring is rather less expensive than the 40T one I thought I might need, so that is good news. And yes, I have the Shimano XTR brakes.

        Nigel

        Reply
        • May 24, 2020 at 8:37 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Nigel,

          It sounds as though you have the older style eccentric BB with the pinch bolts underneath the BB shell. The main problem you will have with these is the very limited clearance between the motor shaft and housing. If you can take a close-up photo and email it to me at: cycletek@outlook.com I’ll have a better idea of compatibility.

          Cheers,
          Tony

          Reply
  • February 12, 2020 at 8:20 pm
    Permalink

    Hi,
    I’m interested in adding a BBS01 250W to a Surly Straggler that I use with a Carry Freedom trailer for hauling shopping and recycling. This has a 68mm bottom bracket, currently fitted with a Hollowtech II BB. I was thinking of carrying the battery in a custom frame bag. Do you see any issues?
    Many thanks,
    Andy

    Reply
    • February 12, 2020 at 9:16 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Andy,

      It should be a straightforward enough conversion. I converted a Surly long-haul trucker last year using a Bafang motor and there were no issues. If your Straggler has drop bars, you won’t be able to use the cut-off sensors (on the STi’s), but you shouldn’t need them on a BBS01 250w – I used a Ridgeback gravel / cross bike with STi shifters and a Bafang BBS02 750w for 12 months and not having cut-off sensors never caused me any problems.

      Assuming you’ve got a compact crankset fitted at present, if you fit a Bafang motor you may want to go for a smaller front chainring like a Lekkie Bling ring – If you’re hauling a bit of weight, I would go for a 36t Lekkie with an 11-36 rear cassette or even an 11-40 if you’ve got lots of steep hills to negotiate (Bafang motors are less prone to issues when lower gearing is used).

      If you need any more advice, please let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
      • February 12, 2020 at 10:07 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,
        Many thanks for the quick reply and the detailed advice. Actually it’s not a stock Straggler but a frameset that I built up with straight bars and with MTB levers and gearing. The chainring is a 24-32-42 triple and the cassette is 11-34. It sounds like I’d probably need to change the cassette to avoid strain on the motor. A smaller chainring as you suggest would also be sensible – I don’t need higher gears as the trailer limits my speed.
        Regarding the cut-off sensors, presumably the motor cuts out when you stop pedalling (I wasn’t planning to fit the thumb throttle)? Or is the response slower than with the cut-off sensors?
        If this is successful I may go on to electrify either my Long Haul Trucker or Ogre as well – I’m getting on in years and my knees are starting to complain about the hills, especially when fully loaded. Is there a battery suitable for touring that would give me 120km range on a low-medium power setting (taking into account a 17kg bike with 15 kg luggage and a 80kg rider)?
        Thanks, Andy

        Reply
        • February 12, 2020 at 11:50 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Andy,
          Most Shimano rear derailleurs that can handle a 34t low gear will go up to a 36t with adjustment of the ‘b’ screw. If you wanted to go to an 11-40 cassette a Shimano Alivio RD-M4000 will do the job – I have one on my Dawes Galaxy and it works perfectly with an 11-40.

          The motor will cut out when you stop pedalling, although on some motors there is a slight delay – this can be easily changed using a Bafang USB programming lead and free software – It is fairly straightforward to alter the firmware settings using free open-source software. You can alter things like the start current (Amps) and also how quickly the current ramps up when you start pedalling, making the power delivery very smooth and progressive. You can also safely increase the maximum current to 18A which will give you a bit more peak power for climbing steep hills when fully-loaded.

          As far as batteries are concerned you would need something like a 36v20ah or above – here is a link to the supplier I use in China, I have purchased well over 100 batteries from them and have very rarely had any problems. They can also custom-build you a battery to a specific size and shape. If you don’t mind spending a bit more money on a battery, speak to Jimmy at ebikebatteries.co.uk – his batteries are fantastic, and he can custom build to your specification.

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
          • February 13, 2020 at 7:48 am
            Permalink

            Excellent, thanks.
            One more question – I noted your comment above about increased resistance when pedalling with the motor off. This probably isn’t an issue with the Straggler as I’d use it for short trips only, so battery life is less relevant. However, for touring it’s important that the bike is still usable when the battery charge is low. Do you think I’d be better off with a hub motor for the touring bike(s)?
            Cheers, Andy

          • February 13, 2020 at 8:40 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Andy,

            The increased resistance is noticeable (when compared with an unassisted bike) but not over the top. When I had my Ridgeback, I used to spend half the time riding without the assist, the only time it became a problem was on hills above 4-5% gradient. A hub motor is definitely better in a lot of respects – you can keep your triple crankset, and they are much easier to pedal without assist. There is more to tidy up on a hub conversion, and you will have an external pedal sensor and controller. In my experience, hub motors are more reliable in the long-term, the only trade-off is less torque (about 35Nm). The best hub motors are made by Bafang, MXUS and the Yose Power motors available from eBay are particularly good.

            Cheers,
            Tony

  • October 22, 2019 at 9:03 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    What a great website, thanks for taking the time.
    I am about to get a cargo bike with the BBS02 36v 15a 250watt motor. It comes with a 17a battery, but am looking to get a spare. The plan is to tour around France with my daughter so ideally need to be doing 80km days. Im a pretty fit cyclist so plan to not really go above levels 3. Will any battery work with this motor or is it specific types, is there any you would recommend for such a trip? Also do you know how long rough a complete charge takes, plus is there anything for rapid charing at all?

    Many thanks
    Ed

    Reply
    • October 23, 2019 at 5:07 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Ed,

      Glad you like the website. Good feedback is always appreciated.

      Most 36v batteries will work if your motor is only drawing 15A maximum. A lot of 36v batteries have 20A BMS these days, so you should be fine.

      Regarding charging, if you are charging at 2A, then it would take in the region of 8-9 hours to fully charge a 17Ah battery (from empty). Luna Cycles do a really good 36v smart charger where you can vary the charge current. Here is the link to their charger.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • October 20, 2019 at 10:45 am
    Permalink

    Hi, Tony.
    I have a hp velotechnik grasshopper fx and I want to install a mid drive motor (tsdz2). I have seen the video “electric conversion” of a hp grasshopper and I have a doubt about installing a 3.5 or 4 kgs mid drive motor on the bottom bracket of the recumbent bike. Does the installation compromise the stability and maneuverability of the recumbent bike in the curves? Does it make your driving harder? Thanks and best regards.

    Reply
    • October 20, 2019 at 12:33 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,
      The Lady whom I did the installation for is an experienced recumbent bike rider, and had previously covered a lot of miles on her HP Velotechnik Grasshopper before the Bafang BBS01 250w conversion.

      She has covered about a 1000 miles since the conversion, and has said that initially the extra weight up front took a little getting used to. But after a few miles She has said the extra weight isn’t particularly noticeable any more.

      Her bike had a SRAM Dual drive 3-speed rear hub with a 9-speed cassette, and a 44t chainring on the motor. There is a noticeable increase in pedalling resistance with the motor switched off.

      The TSDZ2 is about 0.5 kg lighter than the Bafang mid-drive. It may be worth considering a 250w Bafang rear hub motor. I installed one on a Nazca Fuego Recumbent, and the guy cycled across Germany on it back in the summer. No issues with handling and pedalled normally with the motor switched off.

      If you need any more information, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
      • October 27, 2019 at 11:12 am
        Permalink

        Many thanks Tony
        A great website
        Regards

        Reply
  • September 4, 2019 at 4:06 pm
    Permalink

    Dear Tony, many thanks for your prompt and helpful advice. Kind regards. Ninh.

    Reply
    • September 4, 2019 at 5:38 pm
      Permalink

      No problem, anytime I can be of help let me know.
      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • September 4, 2019 at 8:47 am
    Permalink

    Dear Tony,

    I have intalled the BSS01 on my bike. So far so good. The default setting of battery discharge amount is 3. Is this the optimal setting? What would happen if I change it to 8? Whould the discharge amount at 8 bigger than the current 3, or are they both the maximum amount?

    Many thanks in advance for your always helpful advices.

    Ninh.

    Reply
    • September 4, 2019 at 9:17 am
      Permalink

      Hi Ninh,

      If you are referring to the power assist levels, 3 or 5 is just fine on a BBS01B the only difference if you set this to 5 or 9 means there are slighter increments between power assist levels.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • September 1, 2019 at 7:47 pm
    Permalink

    Hi,
    I’m in the process of buying a Bafang 250W engine with battery, but I’m curious about the Ah for batteries. I will commute every day to work (not long, cirka 7km one way). I would like to be able to re-program the controller to say 18A or something if possible. What battery would you say suits me?

    Second question; without any controller changes will my bike go about 25km/h? with re-programming to say 18A, what speed could I expect?

    Third question; will the motor stop driving the wheel as soon as I stop pedaling?

    Thanks for a great review!
    Sam

    Reply
    • September 1, 2019 at 10:14 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Sam,

      The Bafang BBS01 250w will provide pedal assist beyond 25km/h in standard form (up to around 40km/h). You can reprogram the 250w to 18A without any issues, I have done this plenty of times.

      A 36v10ah battery will be more than adequate for a 14km round trip.

      By reprogramming the controller to 18A you will not gain any top speed, maybe a little more acceleration. There are other variables you will need to change in order to get the full benefit of this motor. Here is a link to the best guide on Bafang BBS programming.

      There is usually a slight delay with the motor stopping, when you stop pedalling. This can also be altered using the software, by changing the ‘time of stop’ to 10 milliseconds – it is set at 25ms out of the box. When this setting is changed the motor will cut out the instant you stop pedalling.

      In answer to your question regarding chainring size, it doesn’t matter whether you go for a 44t or 46t. The 44t will give you slightly lower gearing, making the bike better for hill climbing.

      If you need any more advice, let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 13, 2019 at 2:43 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    Thank you very much for everything!

    Kind regards,
    Marko

    Reply
    • August 13, 2019 at 2:58 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Marko,

      No problem, anytime you need any help, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • August 13, 2019 at 1:21 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    It appeared that I have outdated info, AliExpress started to deliver here (Serbia). I will order Bafang spanner, it’s just a matter of time when I am going to need it.

    Last question from my side, can you please recommend me any alternative for Mobilgrease 28, adequate for nylon gears inside, that one is not offered by their importer here?

    Kind regards,
    Marko

    Reply
  • August 13, 2019 at 12:20 pm
    Permalink

    Dear Tony,

    thank you very much for fast respond. Free play is minimal and if such small movement can’t damage gears inside, I would rather avoid dismounting it with non-adequate tools and risking to change more parts inside, which will be hard for me to find. Motor is moving without problems and still produce same sound of almost absolute silence.

    I checked few of YouTube videos and I do have one more question, if you allow me. There should be two needle bearings (or combination of needle on one side and ball bearing on the other), my question is are they the standard ones (used in washing machines, electric tools, bikes, cars) which I can find at bearing shop, or some special ones which only could be ordered from Bafang part dealers?

    Reason why I am asking that is because I will try to find a way how to order Bafang spanner from my country and it’s better for me to order those bearings too, if they are non-standard ones.

    Many thanks!
    Marko

    Reply
  • August 13, 2019 at 8:30 am
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    Value for Money

    10

    Ease of Installation

    6

    Reliability

    9

    Dear Tony,

    Thank you very, very much for all the knowledge you share with us!! I have to say that I appreciate a lot what you do, at the end we are just driving ‘clean energy transport vehicles’ (and enjoying while doing it :), but you contribute to a better world. I mean it.
    I have a question, if you could advice me what would be best to do. I owe https://www.serious-cycles.com/produkt/serious-telluride-e-novation-samsung-black/
    for almost three and a half years and I absolutely love it. I live in a hilly area and I switch on that little bafang wonder only when driving uphill, usually with my 3 year old daughter sitting in front child seat. 250W engine is more than enough for a steepest hill. Otherwise I pedal without e-help. With engine switched on I traveled for ca. 1.900 km, but in total much more asphalt, tarmac and mud passed under my tires. I regularly maintain my bike, and mostly by myself, but so far it was no significant work on it, even so the mechanical components were far from best class even when I bought it. That little ‘8 fun’ engine is working same like on the first day I took it. Perfect!
    To cut the long story short, recently I got that squeaky sound from my middle crank and found that I have free play in the bottom bracket. It’s really minimum, wouldn’t bother it at all (yet) if it would be all mechanical, but I read about damaged pinions inside and I would rather avoid seeing it with my own eyes (and feel it in my wallet :). Engine is not moving a bit (reason why I bought that bike despite having low class mechanical components was because of, from my point of view, cleverly positioned engine up in the frame), only cranks can be moved by hands for a micrometer.
    Would you recommend me to buy Bafang lock-ring spanner and try tightening it a bit, or is there any set of bearings inside bracket which should be replaced? Then, is it about a time that I dismount it and grease gears inside?
    Sorry because of long text, but I have to add that I will have to do this by myself because in my country nobody imports Bafang parts and bicycle workshops treat e-bike owners like Ferrari owners. Most special tool there is tool for bleeding oil from hydraulic brakes, and you are lucky if they don’t pack you small pieces in bag when you come to pick up the bike.

    Thank you very much in advance! Looking forward to read more of your text’s!

    Reply
    • August 13, 2019 at 11:54 am
      Permalink

      Hi Marko,

      Thank you for your positive comments, glad you like my website.

      Regarding your problem, it sounds like you may have a small amount of play in the crank bearings. If the play is minimal, I wouldn’t worry about it too much at the moment. But it is definitely worth keeping an eye on. If the motor isn’t moving then the lockrings shouldn’t need tightening, but it is always worth having a Bafang spanner at hand just in case.

      Here is a link to a series of excellent YouTube videos that detail stripping down the motor and replacing parts (including crank / bottom bracket bearing): https://youtu.be/2eKV-yetjhg

      I hope this information helps, if you need any more advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • July 23, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Hi Tony, Your website here is the most informative on this motor that I could find – thanks for making it. I have a few questions if you don’t mind.

    Can you suggest 2 or 3 bikes that convert easily and work well (especially up hills), since you have converted so many? e.g. Ridgeback Speed, or Carrera Crossfire 2, or Trek etc.

    Would you suggest the 44t ring for a 1 mile 6 degree hill?

    Also, as you mentioned above that the 250 motor is the same one as the 350 except for programmed amps, is it possible to re-programme or overvolt the 250 in that case?

    Many thanks, Tom

    Reply
    • July 23, 2019 at 2:59 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Tom,

      I have converted quite a few Carrera Crossfire’s, in fact I did one only last week and it was a very straightforward conversion. The Ridgeback Speed is also a straightforward bike to convert. If you were using the bike on the road I would go for something like the Ridgeback as it’s lighter than the Crossfire to start with. If you need a bike for all terrain riding the Crossfire will do the job, but it would also be worth considering the Decathlon B’TWIN Riverside 900 it has a better spec than the Crossfire 2 for about £20 more.

      Regarding gearing, a 44t should be okay with the e-assist, It’s very hilly where I live, so I used to have a 36t Lekkie Bling ring on the front.

      If you have the Bafang programming lead and software it is very straightforward to increase the current on the 250w from 15A to 18A but you wouldn’t be able to change the voltage.

      Let me know if you have any more questions.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 11, 2019 at 1:07 pm
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    Excellent. Always prompt, concise, and first of all very useful. Many thanks, Tony.

    Reply
  • June 11, 2019 at 8:17 am
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    Dear Tony,

    it’s me again. My weight is 60 kg, and I will use the bike for commuting, like 4km per day in urban areas. Is there any difference between a 250W and a 350W. I have ordered the 350W one, but can still modify the order, I think.

    Also, I think you stated somewhere that one of the model produces heat in lower gear, but that could be re-programmed? This question might be too early for me to ask, since I have’nt seen any part of the product. But, you know, I am just curiuos, … like a child :).

    Thanks.

    Ninh.

    Reply
    • June 11, 2019 at 10:49 am
      Permalink

      Hi Ninh,

      The 250w and 350w are the same motor, but with slightly different controller programming. The 350w is set to 18 Amps and the 250w is 15 Amps.

      The possible heat issue related to starting the motor off pedalling in a high gear, which would increase the load on the motor. Try to think of it like riding a motorcycle or driving a car, you will need to be in the right gear for optimum performance – low gear for hill climbing and starting off and high gear for higher speeds.

      I hope this answers your questions.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 10, 2019 at 3:11 am
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    Excellent, Tony. I only use it for going to and from work, about 4km in urban. Actually, I don’t need it, but somehow want to have it, own it. I know it is funny, but …

    Thanks and best regards.

    Ninh

    Reply
    • June 10, 2019 at 10:51 am
      Permalink

      The great thing about commuting by e-bike is that you can arrive at work feeling fresh and ready for the day.

      Happy commuting!

      Reply
  • June 9, 2019 at 12:01 pm
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    Dear Tony,
    I have ordered a BBS01 36V, 350W and a Samsung Lithium Batterie 36V, 8.8mA, I think.
    Is the battery good for the motor. If needed I still have the possibility to modify the order. And, would Chinese made batteries be a better option?
    Thanks in advance for your advice.

    Reply
    • June 9, 2019 at 1:23 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Ninh,

      The battery will be fine for the BBS01 350w. If you are using a lot of power the range would be around 15 miles, using pedal assist in various modes should see the range increase to around 30 miles.

      If you need any more advice, let me know.
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 7, 2019 at 8:37 am
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    Dear Tony,

    Your review is very useful for me. I have ordered a BBS01 kit, and while waiting for it, I start looking for info such as your advice.

    The package would come with both a throttle and PAS sensor. Could and or should I use both? I use my bike to commute to work everyday in urban areas.

    Many thanks for your advice.

    Ninh.

    Reply
    • June 7, 2019 at 10:49 am
      Permalink

      Hi Ninh,

      The PAS sensor is an internal component of the motor and the throttle is a separate part that can be fitted if required.

      Throttles are fine to use on flat ground for short periods (if you want a break from pedalling) but can increase the load on the motor controller when used up hill especially when not much pedalling input is being used. Also, if you are using the throttle to get started, you will need to make sure you are in a low gear – the same as if you were on a motorcycle.

      Using the throttle and pedal assist together shouldn’t cause any problems as long as you remember the above information.

      My personal recommendation is unless you really need a throttle (for medical reasons), just stick with the pedal assist.

      I hope this information helps.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • June 7, 2019 at 3:53 pm
        Permalink

        Many thanks,Tony, for your quick and helpful reply. Ninh.

        Reply
        • June 7, 2019 at 6:57 pm
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          It’s my pleasure, glad to have been of some assistance.

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
  • June 6, 2019 at 5:36 pm
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    Hi Tony,

    Thanks for the quick reply
    I’ll have a look at the links.

    Much appreciated
    Keep up the great work
    Hope we can get more folk out of there cars and onto ebikes.

    Richard

    Reply
  • June 6, 2019 at 7:29 am
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    Hi Tony,

    What a fantastic website.
    I’m wanting to convert my Voodoo canzo to electric with a bafang bbs01 250w motor.
    I was wondering if you’d done a conversion on one and what you thought,
    I’ve seen the hailong battery you recommend from unit power and was wondering if it was going to fit my downtube, it will be very close to rear shock.
    Thanks Richard

    Reply
    • June 6, 2019 at 10:59 am
      Permalink

      Hi Richard,

      Thanks for the good feedback, it’s much appreciated.

      I’ve never converted a Canzo, but I’ve done most of the Voodoo Hardtail MTB’s.

      Looking at the spec, the motor would definitely fit. My supplier do a battery that removes sideways. It is a little bit more compact than the standard Hailong case battery and is 36v14ah so it would have a fairly decent range. Here is the link for the side release battery.They also do a compact bottle battery that fits in a standard bottle cage.

      If you need any more info, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
    • November 6, 2019 at 12:55 pm
      Permalink

      Value for Money

      8.5

      Ease of Installation

      5.5

      Reliability

      6.5

      I’ve just installed a Bafang 250w mid drive. You mentioned the counter-intuitive reduction of assistance with higher pedalling cadence. This is frustrating. So I’m going up a hill, I’ve chosen an appropriate low gear, and Bafang says “You’re doing well – no need for me to help!” But I say, No! This is why I installed you – to help me up this hill!”. So I choose a lower gear, pedalling is reduced, and Bafang kicks in. But everything I read says this is bad for Bafang – I should go up hills in a low gear.
      What is the solution to this? One thing perhaps is to just ride with a higher power setting. Is there a programming solution?

      Reply
      • November 6, 2019 at 1:55 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Anthony,

        You will need to purchase a Bafang USB Programming lead and alter the ‘limit speed’ parameters in pedal assist software settings. And you may also want to increase the ‘keep current’. I have noticed on some BBS01’s this is set as low as 20%, when it should really be between 70-80%.Here is the link for the Free Bafang Software download.

        Here is the link on the most comprehensive instructions on how to reprogram the Bafang motor. It is fairly straightforward, I always reprogram the motors as the stock settings are not particularly good.

        If you need any more advice, please let me know.

        Regards,
        Tony

        Reply
    • May 18, 2019 at 9:18 am
      Permalink

      I’ve just checked the photo and it is definitely a Hollowtech II type threaded bottom bracket. The Bafang motor should be a straightforward fit.

      I couldn’t quite see from the photo if it was 68mm or 73mm. If it’s 73mm you will need some spacers and longer bolts between the mounting plate and motor – I usually use a couple of 10mm nuts.

      Let me know if you need any more info.

      Reply
  • May 15, 2019 at 12:22 am
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    Hi Tony
    May I ask how much length is the bottom bracket of the full suspension B’twin in your last picture? I am thinking to put a Tongsheng TSDZ2 on it. I guess it should be 73mm square taper.

    Cheers
    Alex

    Reply
    • May 15, 2019 at 6:24 am
      Permalink

      Hi Alex,

      Yes, that’s correct, the B’TWIN Rockrider 540s has a standard 68-73mm square-tapered bottom bracket. The Bafang mid-drive fitted perfectly, so the TSDZ2 should also be a perfect fit.

      If you need any more help or advice, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • May 16, 2019 at 2:03 pm
        Permalink

        Value for Money

        10

        Ease of Installation

        10

        Reliability

        9

        Can you tell me if you could fit without problems the battery on the frame of Btwin 540s (because of the back suspension i’m worried battery won’t fit), and i heard 540s have 100mm bottom bracket, are you sure btwin 540s is ok for Bafang 68-73mm bottom bracket? Thanks a lot 🙂

        Reply
        • May 16, 2019 at 7:22 pm
          Permalink

          The Hailong Shark case battery (360mm x 90mm x 90mm) was difficult to fit. I converted two 540s bikes last year and the XL frame was tight and the L frame was very difficult. In order to get the battery to fit, I needed to remove the forward rear suspension mounting bolt and push the shock upwards. Another thing to consider is the 540s does not have any bottle holder holes. I had to drill two holes in the frame and use riv-nuts.

          The 540s in the photos definitely had a 68-73mm square-tapered BB. Apart from problems fitting the battery the Bafang motor fitted perfectly.

          If you have any more questions, please let me know.

          All the best,
          Tony

          Reply
          • May 17, 2019 at 10:24 am
            Permalink

            then i’m considering a b’twin 560 but i heard it has some small issues with mounting the bafang motor because of the frame …you know something about that?

            Thanks a lot for your help .

          • May 17, 2019 at 2:00 pm
            Permalink

            I couldn’t say for sure if a Bafang motor would fit the 560s as I have never converted one, but I believe it uses a Shimano Hollowtech II bottom bracket, which means the motor should fit as it would be 68-73mm x 33.5mm (outer diameter).

            If you have a Decathlon store near you, it would be worth seeing if they have one there, and take some vernier calipers to measure the width of the BB and the outer diameter of the bottom bracket.

            Regards,
            Tony

  • April 17, 2019 at 6:45 pm
    Permalink

    Hi

    What kind of periodic maintenance could we expect for this motor?

    Reply
    • April 18, 2019 at 9:02 am
      Permalink

      Hi Peter,

      The kind of periodic maintenance required depends on the use the bike would be getting. If you were using the bike for leisurely weekend rides, then I would check everything once a year. If the bike was being used as a daily commuter then it would be recommended to check everything every more regularly (at least once a month).

      The service life of the chain, gear cassette and rear derailleur can be reduced due to the extra power going through the drive-train – This increased wear can be mitigated with the use of a gearshift sensor.

      The motor itself may need tightening (in the bottom bracket) every few hundred miles using a Bafang lockring spanner.

      It is recommended to re-grease the motor internals every 3000 miles, I use Mobilgrease28 which is an aviation-grade grease that can prolong the life of the Bafang motor internals.

      There are other parts of the motor that can wear over time, including bearings and gears, but this seems less of a problem on the BBS01 250w due to the lower power output.

      I have just serviced a BBS01B 350w for a customer who has done in excess of 3000 miles, and all the internal gears were still in excellent condition.

      Out of all the Bafang motors I have installed the 250w has (so far) proven to be very reliable.

      If you have any more questions, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • December 31, 2018 at 12:22 am
    Permalink

    Hi Ken,

    Thanks for the great comment!

    E-bikes are definitely going to increase in popularity. We just need more investment in cycling infrastructure in this country.

    Have a great 2019!

    All the best,
    Tony

    Reply
    • January 3, 2019 at 3:31 pm
      Permalink

      Value for Money

      10

      Ease of Installation

      10

      Reliability

      9.5

      Tony converted my giant ATX mountain bike to an e-bike. On Tony’s advice I opted for the bafang BBS01 250w motor, I use my motor as assist only as I still wanted to do most of the work. Tony did a neat and tidy job, the motor has been brilliant with no problems, I enjoy my bike rides more now, as I go out in all conditions. Tony is a trustworthy person, if I have any problems I know he is only a phone call away. I travelled a round trip of 840 miles in 20 hours for Tony to do the installation – Sunderland to Cornwall. I have no regrets and the bike is brilliant. Many thanks Tony, keith.

      Reply
      • January 3, 2019 at 4:00 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Keith,

        Thank you for your positive comments. I hope you continue to enjoy your bike. If you ever need any help or advice, give me a call.

        Cheers,
        Tony

        Reply
  • December 30, 2018 at 7:37 pm
    Permalink

    Brilliant website! The world needs more people like this before we totally ruin the planet…. Keep it up, much respect!

    Reply
    • August 19, 2019 at 9:53 pm
      Permalink

      Hi
      Thinking of buying the 2019 Calibre Bossnut Evo 2019 and would like to add the bafang BBS01 250w midrive. Do you know if this will fit.
      Thanks Kev

      Reply
      • August 19, 2019 at 10:03 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Kev,

        It should be a straightforward job. I fitted a BBS02 500w 36v to a Calibre Bossnut full suspension mountain bike a few weeks ago.

        The only issue I had was mounting the battery. I ended up fitting a compact bottle battery to the top tube.

        You could also use a clamp on seat post mounted battery.

        If you need any more info please let me know.

        Cheers,
        Tony

        Reply

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