fbpx

E-Bike Kit Reviews

DIY e-bike builders are a crazy bunch – I’ve been doing it for a living for nearly five years and I still have to question my sanity sometimes! If you are thinking of taking the plunge and building your own e-bike, I have posted a selection of honest ‘warts and all’ reviews and comparisons on some of the best electric bike conversion kits currently available.

I have extensive knowledge of all the kits reviewed here, and have personally installed nearly two hundred electric bike kits through my career.

I will be focusing primarily on the popular Bafang and Tongsheng mid-drive systems, and will also be adding detailed reviews of the 250w – 1000w front and rear wheel hub motor kits. Check out my article featuring 10 of the best ebike conversion kits and read my electric bike conversion kit buyers guide for more information.

electric bike conversion kit guide

 

If you are looking to build an insanely quick e-bike, there are also plenty of excellent kits available. I have compiled a shortlist of some of the best selling fast electric bike kits currently on offer.

Salsa mukluk fat bike fitted with a bafang bbshd mid drive electric conversion kit and 52 volt battery
Salsa Mukluk Fat bike fitted with a Bafang BBSHD mid-drive conversion kit

Fat bikes have been increasing in popularity for the last few years, and there are more options than ever to convert to electric – check out my post on the best ebike conversion kits for fat bikes.

Why a conversion kit and not a ready built e-bike?

An electric bike conversion kit can be a cost effective way to transform your bike into an e-bike. In my article electric bike vs conversion kit I will go over the pros and cons of buying a factory built e-bike versus converting a bicycle you already own.

Advertisement

If you are bothered about the e-bike laws in your country it would be worth checking out the legality of your planned build before choosing a motor kit. Different countries have different laws relating to electrically assisted bicycles. UK and EU electric bike laws differ from the USA and Canada.

You will also need to find the right lithium battery pack to go with your conversion. My article explaining the basics behind electric bike batteries can be found here.

electric bike battery
A 52v 14Ah battery fitted to a full suspension MTB conversion

Is converting a bicycle to electric assist easy or difficult?

Different bikes can throw up different challenges, but I would say on the whole, most electric bike conversions are fairly straightforward. You will certainly need a degree of mechanical knowledge (and patience) in order to do the job properly. I have been doing it for nearly three years, and I still make mistakes from time to time!

bafang mid drive electric bike kit
✅Link to the Bafang mid drive electric bike kit (trusted vendor)

Make sure you have the right tools for the job. There is nothing more frustrating, than making a start only to find you have to pop out to your local bike shop for a spanner or socket. I would also recommend getting a bike stand.

Choose your donor bike wisely

Personally I would go for something like a hardtail mountain bike or a hybrid. Ideally, something that isn’t too fancy and hasn’t got a pressed fit bottom bracket (a right pain if you are going to fit a mid-drive motor).

hybrid city bike

If you are fitting a front or rear wheel hub motor, you will need to make sure your bike hasn’t got thru-axles, as you will not be able to install the motor wheel.

tongsheng tsdz2 mid drive electric bike kit
✅Link to Tongsheng TSDZ2 (trusted vendor on Aliexpress)

Conclusion

All the kits reviewed in this section are from well established brands . I will offer you my own personal opinion on each motor, and will not just promote the good points but will also make you aware of the bad points and any reliability issues.

Ultimately, I want you to make the right choice. Building your own electric bike can be fun and rewarding, but it can also be a right pain, if things don’t go to plan.

The good news is,  there are loads of videos on YouTube detailing how to fit these kit. I will be posting an article on installation in the near future.

If you need any help or advice, please feel free to use the comments section at the bottom of this page and I will get back to you within 24hrs.

Buy the Bafang BBS02B 750w from trusted vendors✅

The Bafang BBS02B is available from these websites with shipping to EU countries, UK, US and Canada.
AliExpress.com Product - Bafang 8FUN BBS02B 48V 750W 25A mid drive motor Bicycle Electric Bike EBIKE e-Bike Engine Conversion Kits newest version
Buy from Amazon (multiple countries)
Buy from eBay
👉Compare Bafang BBS02B 750w prices (UK visitors only)

Buy the Bafang BBSHD from trusted vendors✅

The Bafang BBSHD is available to buy from the links below with shipping to multiple regions including the EU, UK, US and Canada.
Buy from Aliexpress (various shipping options)
Buy from Amazon (mulitple countries)
Buy on eBay
👉Compare Bafang BBSHD prices (UK visitors only)

Buy the Bafang BBS01B 250w from trusted vendors✅

The Bafang BBS01B can be purchased from the links below with shipping to most regions including the EU, UK, US and Canada.
Buy from Aliexpress (mulitple shipping options
Buy from Amazon (various countries)
Buy from eBay
👉Compare Bafang BBS01B 250w prices (UK visitors only)

Buy the Tongsheng TSDZ2 from trusted vendors✅

The Tongsheng TSDZ2 is available from the links below with shipping to the EU, UK, US and Canada.
Buy from Aliexpress (various shipping options)
Buy from Amazon (multiple countries)
Buy from eBay
👉Compare Tongsheng TSDZ2 prices (UK visitors only)

The kits listed below are capable of producing an insane amount of power, make sure your bike is up to the job.  Some of these kits can also be used to electrify a small motorcycle.

Fast Electric Bike Kits (Global Shipping)Product Photo
1000w Electric Bike kit1000w electric bike kit
1500w Electric Bike kit1500w electric bike kit
72v 2000w Electric Bike Kit2000w 72v electric bike kit
3000w 72v Electric Bike kit with 750c color display 3000w electric bike kit
50H QSV3 48v-120v 5000w Electric Bike hub motor5000w electric bike hub motor
72v 8000w QS 273 Electric Bike kit with color display and bluetooth72v 8000w electric bike kit
48v / 52v 20ah Hard case triangle battery52v 20ah hard case triangle battery
72v 21ah Electric bike triangle battery72v 21ah triangle electric bike battery

48 thoughts on “E-Bike Kit Reviews

  • May 26, 2021 at 5:57 pm
    Permalink

    Hi again
    There seems to be some talks about torque as well. As I understand it the higher the better. Or? The Bafang G020 front hub motor has 45 Nm, which according to where I read about it seemed at the low limit. What’s your opinion on torque, how much do one need at least? And does the NCB or Yosepower 250W hub motor have more torque?

    Reply
    • May 26, 2021 at 8:21 pm
      Permalink

      Most 250w geared hub motors are in the 35-45Nm torque. The claimed 45Nm torque for the Bafang is optimistic for a 250w front hub motor, I reckon they’re all around the 35-40Nm range. I’ve ridden Yose Power and Bafang, and personally I can’t tell the difference in performance.

      Reply
  • May 25, 2021 at 6:52 pm
    Permalink

    Hi again
    Your suggestion about the NCB front wheel seemed great. I also saw that ATM sells Bafang. Regarding the 28″ front wheel hub motor, do you still suggest the NCB?

    Why I am asking is that know that the display on the Bafang can be reprogrammed with USB and a computer software to get higher speed. I also intend to buy a wrist throttle for it and would like to be able to use the throttle all the way up to max speed, not having to pedal at all. Would that be possible with either NCB or Bafang. Also, which has less magnetic resistance? I read that some front hub motors have a freewheel feature, if I understood it correctly.

    So I am choosing between these. Is NCB better than the Bafang? Don’t know whether G020 or G311 is better or different in which way. And what about this magnetic resistance or the possibility to reprogram the speed or the ability to use only the throttle all the way up to max speed without using the pedals?

    BAFANG 250W 36V 28″ Front Wheel FWD Kit IP65 C961 G020 silver indented light connection E-bike conversion kit hub motor (317 euro)
    BAFANG 250W 36V 28″ Front Wheel FWD Kit IP65 C961 G311 silver indented light connection E-bike conversion kit hub motor (309 euro)

    E-Bike conversion Kit hub motor NCB 250W 28″ front wheel kit FWD disc+ v brake waterproof IP65 36V (230 euro)
    E-Bike conversion Kit hub motor NCB 250W 28″ front wheel kit FWD disc+ v brake waterproof with light connection (250 euro)

    Think I go for the strongest one

    Li-Ion Battery E-Bike Conversion Kit black 36V 10.4AH MX18650 (281 euro)
    Li-Ion Battery E-Bike Conversion Kit black 36V 13AH MX18650 (313 euro)
    Li-Ion Battery E-Bike Conversion Kit black 36V 15.6AH MX18650 (324 euro)

    Handgas Split ( non BAFANG ) NCB DIY EBike PEDELEC Conversion Kit 3 Pin Yellow male (19 euro)
    Handgas undivided ( non BAFANG ) NCB DIY EBike PEDELEC conversion kit 3 pin yellow male (19 euro)

    Don’t actually understand the difference or which to use for the NCB. Unfortunately I didnt din any wrist throttle for Bafang at ATM. But as long as it has a Higi connector I should be able to buy it elsewhere I suppose.

    Regards
    Martin

    Reply
    • May 25, 2021 at 7:45 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,

      In my opinion there’s no noticeable difference between the Bafang and NCB motor. Internally the design is very similar. Both motors use a planetary gear reduction, so the motor is always spinning faster than the wheel, making it produce more torque and better efficiency.

      Out of all the hub motors I’ve installed, I would say the Yose Power kit is probably one of the best – I have fitted over 50 of these kits and never had a single failure. If you have a look on their eBay shop they have a wide choice of hub motor kits and batteries – I would suggest something like a 36v 15.6Ah for the maximum range. The Yose POwer kit has an excellent display and comes with a throttle.

      Regarding resistance, I would say it’s negligible at best. I have ridden many miles on geared hub motor bikes and find you don’t need to use the assist as much as something like a Bafang mid-drive. You can only re-program the BBS motor, the hub motors use different controllers and require a more complicated arrangement – bluetooth dongle and special software.

      Let me know if you need any more information.

      Kind regards,
      Tony

      Reply
      • May 25, 2021 at 8:59 pm
        Permalink

        HI
        I need to buy it from within the EU in order not to have to pay extra VAT and fees here in Sweden.

        So if only the BBS motor is reprogrammable, how can one raise the max speed for front wheel hub motors, being Bafang, NCB or the YosePower kit, that is, more than 25 km/h? And how can one make it possible to only use the throttle without having to use the pedals? Or are these things not possible? I also read somewhere that one can increase the max speed through the display to about 30 km/h. At least I would like to be able to only use the throttle up to max speed without using the pedals all the time. I also think the half wrist throttle seems more practical. I also understand that there are a lot of different connection types.

        I tried a front wheel hub motor today. And one could sort of fool the motor to believe you assisted the motor just by turning the pedals around, but without using any force to drive the bike with them. So practically the motor did all the work.

        But the throttle on that bike worked up to 6 km/h. It was only for, for example, starting the bike or when leading the bike, for example uphill. But I would like to be able to use it all the time.

        I’m only been looking at Bafang and now NCS because they were a bit familiar. I will check out if it’s possible to buy YosePower from within the EU.

        Reply
        • May 26, 2021 at 6:40 am
          Permalink

          The maximum speed can be programmed on most e-bike conversion kit displays. On the Bafang BBS you can re-program the motor performance characteristics and fine-tune the pedal assist. With all of the hub motor kits mentioned you can alter the speed through the display if required.

          The Yose Power kit has been sold within the EU for about 4-5 years – I have looked inside these motors and the design is also very similar to the Bafang. If performance is an important factor then you may be worth sticking with the BBS01B 250w, although these motors have a higher failure rate than their hub counterparts. You can buy Yose Power from eBay.de they usually ship from Germany, Austria or Poland.

          Regards,
          Tony

          Reply
        • May 26, 2021 at 7:21 am
          Permalink

          You can alter the maximum speed through the LCD displays on most of the hub motors available (including Bafang, NCB and Yose Power). With the Bafang BBS you can program other parameters like pedal assist characteristics and current (amps).

          The Yose Power kit is available from eBay.de and is usually shipped from Germany, Austria or Poland – I have opened up these motors in the past and their design is very similar to Bafang (hub motors). If performance is a key factor maybe the Bafang BBS would be better for your needs, but there will be a compromise on long-term reliability whereas hub motors usually just keep on going.

          All the hub motor kits have throttle control and speed can usually be set to 35km/h and sometimes more, the bike you tested was probably an EU-spec e-bike which has throttle to 6km by law. Here in the UK you can fit a throttle, but only to a used bike or a factory e-bike built before 2016.

          My personal preference would be the Yose Power kit – Here is my full review of this kit based on over 50 installations. The rear hub kit would fit your bike without issue.

          Regards,
          Tony

          Reply
          • May 26, 2021 at 9:20 am
            Permalink

            A big thanks for all answers and your big patience with my many questions. I’ve now settled for:

            -front hub motor (28″ 250W 36V)
            -battery with around at least 15 Ah and mounted on the frame (bottle mountings)
            -a throttle is a must

            Buying a kit seems to include a thumb throttle, but I would like to switch it to a handlebar twist throttle instead. I’m an old biker 🙂 Unfortunately I have trouble finding twist throttle for Bafang, NCB or Yosepower front hub motors. For the BBS there is Higo connection, but for hub motors there seem to be other connection types for the handlbar twist throttle.

            Do you by any chance know if and where I could buy a twist handlebar throttle for front hub motors? That have the correct connection. Or do I miss something here? Seem to be many standards.

      • May 25, 2021 at 9:14 pm
        Permalink

        I had a look at YosePower. Looks really nice. Unfortunately they don’t seem to have 28″ front hub motor, only for rear wheel. or at least I didn’t find any kit. If you know, please point me in the right direction.

        Reply
    • May 26, 2021 at 9:09 am
      Permalink

      A store now told me that using a throttle to run the bike all the time would finally burn the controller box. Is that really true?

      Reply
      • May 26, 2021 at 9:21 am
        Permalink

        Yes, that’s correct. If you use the throttle to climb steep hills without adding any pedalling input it will put load on the controller, possibly leading to a heat build up. The throttle should only be used occasionally.

        Reply
        • May 26, 2021 at 9:53 am
          Permalink

          And what about general street use in the city, some uphill streets included?

          Reply
          • May 26, 2021 at 4:22 pm
            Permalink

            It might be worth trying a company called fasterbikes.eu for throttle and other parts you may need. The front hub motor should be ideal for general city riding with moderate climbs (about 10% gradient with a bit of added effort).

  • May 25, 2021 at 6:36 pm
    Permalink

    Hi again
    Now I have learned about freewheel, but don’t fully understand. I suppose that is for get rid of the magnetic resistance when the engine is not pulling, right? And is that resistance much, and does the NBC motor you linked to have it or the Bafang G311 or G020?
    Sorry about all questions, but I would like to get it right when ordering.
    Regards
    Martin

    Reply
    • May 25, 2021 at 6:39 pm
      Permalink

      Sorry, you answered my question already.

      Reply
  • May 22, 2021 at 4:58 pm
    Permalink

    Sorry, forgot the link to the package. Is everything really included and okej? Comparing batteries, this one seemed a little week, only 10 Ah. Is that enough? In total, engine and battery, it’s about half the price when buying it in Sweden.

    If you can fix your link and the price is about the same, I’m happy to use your affiliate link instead if it gives you some kickbacks. Thanks again for a great site.

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/33035379483.html?aff_fcid=861a3c26954345bd80c72e22ad76ea36-1621700347263-07388-Bcx9P816&aff_fsk=Bcx9P816&pvid=9702e635-5499-4ede-b593-84902d9127c0&aff_platform=product&sk=Bcx9P816&aff_trace_key=861a3c26954345bd80c72e22ad76ea36-1621700347263-07388-Bcx9P816&rmsg=do_not_replacement&scm=1007.23534.124736.0&terminal_id=90153e2f6136468bae72c9f718001266

    /Martin

    Reply
    • May 22, 2021 at 9:11 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Martin,

      The Bafang mid-drive produces noticeable resistance when on zero assist, if you would prefer not to have any resistance then a small rear hub motor would be your best option. Assuming your bike has a 28″ / 700c rear wheel the YosePower kit available from eBay is excellent, they also sell a range of batteries. Here is a link to their eBay store. I have written a separate article on the YosePower kit here. Here is a link to the Bafang BBs01B 250w kit with a 36v 17Ah battery.

      If you have any further questions, let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • May 22, 2021 at 9:42 pm
        Permalink

        Hi again
        Thanks for your information. I assume that it’s not possible with zero resistance and a mid hub motor then.
        I decided for a mid hub motor because I’ve been told that it’s stronger for going uphill than wheel hub motors. I only intend to use it in the city, but as you might know Stockholm city can be quite hilly and we also have a lot of bridges.

        The mid motor not having zero resictance while only using pedals is not a big issue, since I intend to actually use the engine as much as possible. I’ve have some health problems at the moment and havent been able to ride a bicycle longer distances or taking long walks, so an electrical bicycle would be a great option for me to skip the car or public transportation and go into and around in the city. And on hilly streets I would prefer to use the engine as much as possible. Sometimes I might even want or need to use the throttle that is included. I do know about the restrictions.

        Is a rear wheel motor better than a front wheel motor on hilly streets? And would it still be better to go for the mid placed motor, if I want to let the motor doing all work?

        Thanks or taking the time to answer my questions. Due to my health condition I really need it to be right and that the engine do really the most of the work, but still within regulations.

        Reply
        • May 23, 2021 at 8:28 am
          Permalink

          Yes, a mid-drive would be better for climbing steep hills, but if the hills are moderate a hub motor should do the job. I live at the bottom of a 8-10% hill of 0.6km and most of my customers who have the hub motor find it can get them up the hill comfortably (in full power mode).

          A rear hub motor would be preferential, although a front motor would be fine for general city riding. A Bafang mid-drive will be more energy efficient and can be fine-tuned using a USB lead and free opensource software. I do find the Bafang mid-drive motor can be more prone to reliability issues in the long term.

          Reply
      • May 23, 2021 at 9:01 pm
        Permalink

        Thanks.
        I think I will go for the front hub model and in the beginning not connect the sensor to the pedal hub. Just to see how the engine works and just use the thumb throttle cable. Thanks for your links. Do you by any chanse have a link for a Bafang front wheel kit?

        Reply
        • May 23, 2021 at 9:03 pm
          Permalink

          Or a link for a kit from another label you think is okej and economical. Thanks again. Will be really fun to build my own e-bike.

          Reply
          • May 24, 2021 at 10:23 am
            Permalink

            Hi Martin,

            Here is a link to a very good quality front wheel kit on Amazon Germany. It’s not made by Bafang, but they sell a similar kit here in the UK and I’ve never had any issues.

            You can also purchase the Bafang front wheel kit, but I believe it will be shipped from China so delivery will take longer – Here is the link for the Bafang kit.

            Kind regards,
            Tony

  • May 22, 2021 at 4:54 pm
    Permalink

    Hi
    Thanks for a great site.
    I’m thinking about converting my Nishiki Hybrid, ten years old, and am about to inform myself about everything.

    I’ve read that when the engine is 0, then it still makes it harder to use the pedals because of resistance. Is that something you could fix, so that it would be possible to pedal the bike without engine resistance? Like a freewheel function or what it’s called in English. If one run out of battery, one should be able to use the bike in a normal way, right?

    Followed your link, but it didn’t work unfortunately.
    I found this price really good and it could be shipped from Germany, so no extra VAT or fees for me in Sweden. But if you fix your link, I can follow it instead, så you can get some kickback.

    /Martin

    Reply
  • December 22, 2020 at 7:42 am
    Permalink

    Hi Tony

    Thank you for this wonderful site!
    I got a small question about the Tongsheng TSDZ2 and its coarse-break-version. (Back pedaling is engaged) Since I can’t find any offers of this type of motor anymore, I’m thinking about refitting a normal TSDZ2. Do you have any thoughts or information on this modification? 🙂

    Thank you for the support

    Reply
    • December 22, 2020 at 1:56 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,

      I have found the Coaster brake version of the TSDZ2 with one of my suppliers on Alipexpress – but it ships from Poland, so I’m not sure how long delivery will take considering the current situation. Here is the link to the product page.

      If you wanted to fit a standard TSDZ2 (to a bike with a coaster brake) you will need access to an engineer with the specific tools and experience. I have never installed a coaster brake version, but I believe the only difference would be in the freewheeling mechanism. I have found an article on endless-sphere.com with some interesting links.

      Sorry I couldn’t offer more help.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • December 22, 2020 at 5:17 pm
        Permalink

        Ciao Tony

        Thank you for the help in your reply and the links. I will check with the supplier, if it is a real coarse break version. It’s not that easy to find all you need on AliXpress…
        I retrofitted an old swissarmy bike with an Tongsheng TSDZ2 (coarse break version) with a coarse break gear hub in the back and it’s a beauty to cruise. So ritght now I’m looking to build two or three more bikes.

        Reply
    • September 16, 2020 at 4:43 pm
      Permalink

      Hi,

      I have checked the specification on the Carrera Titan and it uses a SRAM Powerspline bottom bracket which has a standard BSA 73mm threaded bottom bracket shell. So any of the Bafang mid-drive motors will fit (68mm-73mm BB size).The only real problem I can see if limited space to mount a decent-sized battery. You’re going to need either a compact bottle battery or maybe a seat post mounted battery pack. Depending on the frame size, you might get away with a side-release battery.

      Reply
  • June 12, 2020 at 6:55 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony, was really interested in your electric conversion of an HP Velotechnik Grasshopper. I have an HP Spirit which I am interested in converting and would the conversion be identical to the Grasshopper ? The length of the bottom bracket shell on the Spirit is 68mm with no obstructions either side of the main frame tube and it has a Rohloff hub. Thankyou in advance for your time.

    Reply
    • June 13, 2020 at 10:39 am
      Permalink

      Hi Andy,

      As long as the Sprint has a standard threaded bottom bracket, I don’t see any potential issues. The Rohloff has been tested by a number of e-conversion specialists in the US and the general consensus is it’s one of the best internally geared hubs due to its durable construction. I would recommend sticking with a lower-powered mid-drive like a Bafang BBS01B 250w / 350w or Tongsheng TSDZ2 to minimise any potential increased wear and tear, although the Rolhoff has stood the test of time when used with more powerful versions.

      I installed a TSDZ2 on an Ice Trike with Shimano Alfine 11 Di2 and it worked a treat!

      If you need any more advice, let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
  • May 26, 2020 at 9:43 am
    Permalink

    Hi

    Do the batteries fit ok on the rockrider 540s inbeteeen the rear suspension and down tube?

    What is the gap measurement on these bikes and what from size would you suggest?

    Reply
    • May 26, 2020 at 11:49 am
      Permalink

      Hi Ben,

      I’ve converted 3 Rockrider 540s to electric using a Bafang motor and small Hailong case battery – the minimum size frame you will need is a ‘L’ but it’s a lot easier to fit the battery in an ‘XL’ frame. I’m not sure of the exact measurements, but there isn’t a lot of space and there’s no bottle holder bosses. I had to drill and rivnut some in to mount the battery mounting plate. To remove / insert the battery you will need to remove the forward Allen bolt (securing the rear shock) and push the shock up, then when the battery is in place re-insert the bolt and tighten. All in all it’s a right pain and now I will only fit small compact bottle batteries to full-suss bikes. The Hailong case battery (smaller version) is 365mm L x 90mm W x 90mm H.

      If you have any more questions, let me know.

      Cheers,
      Tony

      Reply
  • April 1, 2020 at 8:49 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony
    recently fitted the TSDZ2 to my wife’s giant liv frame, so impressed I bought one for myself and fitted it to a carrera. when I took my bike for a test run with the motor fitted all was fine until we actually went for a bike ride and the chain came off several times only in turbo mode, the cause for the derailment was the motor kept going after I had stopped pedaling, after fine tuning the rear mech everything seems to be working fine, then another problem which has happened to both bikes the motor seemed to stopped working, no indication on screen as to the problem, so tuned everything off and then turned back on again and it worked fine , I have found my motor is noisy compared to my wife’s. I would appreciate any advice that you could give me.
    By the way have found your site very useful indeed

    Reply
    • April 1, 2020 at 10:29 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Tony,

      I had a similar issue with a two bikes I recently converted (regarding pedal assist not working properly). On one bike the speed sensor had been knocked inwards and was too close to the wheel magnet (it needs to be at least 5mm away). Once re-adjusted everything worked fine. On the second bike I couldn’t find any obvious fault and after a 10 mile ride it was still running perfectly. The problem may have been down to powering up the display with one foot resting on a pedal. Each time you power up the Tongsheng, the torque sensor re-calibrates. If there is even the slightest weight on the pedal when powering up, it will play havoc with the pedal assist.

      Regarding the motor noise, it does seem vary from motor to motor. I find after you have done a good few miles it should quieten down.

      Let me know how things go, and if you need any more help, give me a shout.

      Best Wishes,
      Tony

      Reply
  • January 6, 2020 at 2:02 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony
    I have been reading your posts with interest and saw you were converting a whyte 46 summer 2019
    I own a Whtye 46 and am interested in doing such a conversion. Is it a good donor bike or would I be better to use my Trek 6500 hard tail.

    Reply
    • January 6, 2020 at 11:09 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Stuart,

      The Whyte was fairly straightforward to convert, apart from having to mount the battery to the top tube, and having to use a steel hose clamp to secure the TSDZ2 motor in place. I would personally convert the Trek Hardtail, you will have the option of a more powerful battery, and you should be able to secure the motor easily enough.

      If you have any more questions, please let me know.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Reply
  • June 9, 2019 at 5:46 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    Thanks for the advice, the correction wasn’t necessary I see. Great Advice, will try all the things you said. Thanks!!

    Reply
  • May 31, 2019 at 10:21 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony,

    I am a experienced bike converter as well, I converted about 10 bikes by now. I learned a lot from your website, thanks for that! I do have a reoccurring problem with my bikes. The problems occur with btwin rockriders 520 and 540 (the only bikes I converted). I use BBS02B 750 watt kits. The problem is that under high power (500+ watt) the chain can slip in the smallest rear gear. So the chain makes a loud pop and than skips a teeth it seems. Is this a problem you encountered as well? I see that you have a lot of experience with the btwin brand. I would like to know, if you do something special to avoid those problems. If you even have those problems. Like do you maybe shorten the chain? Or do you adjust your derailleur in a certain way? I would like to know, thanks in advance.

    Reply
    • June 1, 2019 at 12:05 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Geil,

      Due to the chain-line offset caused by the motor it is necessary to adjust the rear derailleur. Chain length should not be too much of a problem if you are using a 44t front chainring. I do not usually have any problems with the 520 or 540 after adjustment. Sometimes it is just a case of adjusting the ‘H’ limit screw a little.

      To adjust the rear derailleur:
      1: Select the highest gear (smallest sprocket on rear cassette).
      2: Turn the barrel adjuster on the derailleur all the way in and then back it off a couple of turns.
      3: Release the cable clamp and adjust the ‘H’ limit screw (if necessary), so that the upper jocky wheel on the derailleur is just inboard of the small sprocket.
      4: Pull the gear cable so it is tight, and then tighten the securing bolt.
      5: Shift up and down the cassette – if there is any cogging noise on any gear, finely turn the barrel adjuster either in or out until it stops.

      It can take a bit of time to get it spot on, but it should do the trick.

      If you need any more help, please let me know.

      All the best,
      Tony

      Reply
      • June 9, 2019 at 4:53 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,

        I have another problem with the rockrider 520 and 540. I had a customer with a loose motor. The lockring was tide, but the ring underneath the lockring was loose. Shouldn’t the lockring press against that other ring to prevent it from comming loose? I have the idea that the lockring isn’t actually touching the other ring. So there is a gap between them, that why the ring came loose I think. Shouldn’t the lockring make contact with the other ring? Do you use another spacer to secure your bafang motors to rockrider 520 and 540? Or do you just tighten the rings really well? Or do you use some extra loctide or something? I would like to know if you have encountered this problem as well. And if you know how to fix it. Thanks in advance.

        Reply
        • June 9, 2019 at 5:31 pm
          Permalink

          Hi Giel,

          Unfortunately the inner lockring on the Bafang does have a tendency work its way loose from time to time. I have tried using loctite in the past, but it doesn’t seem to make much of a difference. It just makes it more difficult to re-tighten things.

          I usually tighten the inner lockring as much as possible by hand and then tap the spanner a quarter of a turn further with a hammer – but make sure the drive side inner casing isn’t pressing up against the chainstay or you will need to use a spacer.

          The outer lockring seems to serve no other purpose other than cosmetic. There are two solutions to the problem that have worked for me in the past.

          1: Make a shim out of 1mm sheet steel to fit in the bottom bracket, this can help with taking up any slack there may be.

          2: Use a motor stabiliser bar from Luna cycles, or get one fabricated. Here is the link. They also do one for a full suspension bike.

          The other thing that I now do is supply a lockring spanner and crank puller with each conversion and explain to the customer beforehand of the need to periodically tighten the inner lockring.

          I hope this information helps.

          Tony

          Reply
          • June 9, 2019 at 5:59 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Tony,

            Sorry for the many comments but I have an idea that might fix it, I wonder what you think of it. If you tighten the ring on the outside really well, it still doesn’t touch the other ring on the inside. I think if you add a spacer in-between the outside ring and the inside ring it does contact with eachother. By doing this, the outside ring puts pressure on the inside ring. So if the inside ring wants to become loose, it gets stopped by the outside ring. This now isn’t the case because there is still some room between the two rings. I know that there is some space between the rings, because if you look inside the outside ring, it isn’t scratched at all. If they would have contacted you should see some scratches on the ring I think. Could this just be a design flaw by bafang? Or do you think this idea won’t matter at all? I would like to know. Thanks.

          • June 9, 2019 at 6:52 pm
            Permalink

            Hi Giel,

            I have never tried using a spacer between the inner and outer lockring before, but it may be worth a try. The source of the problem seems to be very slight manufacturing variations in bicycle bottom bracket dimensions. I find sometimes the motor shaft is a very tight fit, and other times the motor fits in very easily.

            If you can find a spacer that will fit, it is certainly worth trying, but there is a limit to how much you can tighten the outer lockring as it is aluminium and it is easy to strip the thread if over-tightened.

            If you try this method, let me know how you get on.

            Many thanks,
            Tony

      • June 9, 2019 at 5:32 pm
        Permalink

        Hi Tony,

        Some corrections to my last message, with lockring I mean the ring that is visible from the outside. That ring also has a lot of small contact points for the tool (20+ points). With the second ring I mean the ring that is underneath the lockring. So the ring with the 4 indentations. That is used to directly tighten the motor. I also read on the internet that the locking, so the ring on the outside only has a esthetic purpose. It doesn’t actually lock something. I call it the lockring, but is that correct? Or is it just a ring to make it look nicer?

        Reply
    • August 5, 2019 at 5:29 am
      Permalink

      Hi Tony
      What about a kit that is compatible with hydraulic brake systems as I see the levers and perches supplies are for cables only

      Reply
      • August 5, 2019 at 6:30 am
        Permalink

        Hi Brett,

        Most of the kits available are usually only supplied with brake levers for mechanical disc brakes / rim brakes. The Tongsheng TSDZ2 does not require brake cut-offs as it is a torque sensing motor (unless a throttle option is specified). Some suppliers will offer the option of hydraulic brake sensors.

        There are hydraulic brake sensors available for the Bafang mid-drive motors and most hub motor kits. Some suppliers can provide replacement hydraulic brakes with sensors fitted.

        I hope this information helps.

        Regards,
        Tony

        Reply
  • February 6, 2019 at 1:25 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Tony. Ive found your website very informative. I am considering fitting a 250w bbs01, but due to budget constraints (£250)my choice of donor bike is restricted. I am looking at either the rockrider range from declathlon or the carrera range from halfords. Would these bike be compatable with the bbs01?
    Thankyou, John.

    Reply
    • February 6, 2019 at 2:19 pm
      Permalink

      Hi John,
      I have installed the Bafang BBS01 and BBS02 on all of the Carrera range of bikes. The only issues I experienced were, the bottom brackets are always very tightly fitted and can be difficult to remove. And usually, you will need to take a rounded file to smooth off some of the rough edges inside the bottom bracket shell, in order to get the motor axle to fit in.

      I have also fitted the Bafang motors to the Decathlon B’TWIN Rockrider 520, 540 and 540s. These were all very straightforward conversions. The bottom brackets always came out relatively easily, and no filing was necessary.

      If you have any more questions, please feel free to ask.

      Tony

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *